Information Management

Integrating Automatic Capture with Enterprise Fax Deployment Models

When it comes to initiating critical business processes, paper based faxing remains a key driver within many industries. Organizations utilize paper based faxing as a simple, ubiquitous mechanism for transacting business. However they’re also experiencing slow business cycle times that are negatively impacting profitability. In the last blog post we discussed automatic capture technology’s ability to turn incoming fax documents into actionable data. Now many organizations are automating paper-based fax processes to gain greater ROI by integrating automatic capture technology with enterprise fax deployments models including: Cloud fax: a deployment that doesn’t require any on-premises fax hardware, software or telephone connections to transmit fax messages. Instead users send faxes directly from their email accounts or common desktop applications. Cloud fax significantly reduces the cost of procuring and maintaining physical fax infrastructure while driving platform flexibility and scalability: On premises fax: a deployment in which a fleet of fax machines, multi-function devices or fax servers reside on premises, using telephony hardware to transmit messages. On-premises fax software connects with virtually any type of telephone network for secure, electronic faxing and supports very robust integrations.   Hybrid is another deployment option that combines an on-premises fax server with cloud-based transmission. Regardless of the chosen deployment model, enterprise fax software and services are well known input sources that organizations integrate automatic capture technology with. To enhance cycle times further organizations also integrate additional value-added services, like business workflow solutions, to help automate fax message processing from end-to-end. Please visit www.opentext.com/campaigns/intelligent-fax-workflow  to learn more about enterprise fax deployment models and their ability to drive automated fax workflow solutions.  

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Enterprise World Training: Prepare Yourself for the Next Five Years

customer experience

A long, long time ago, someone told me that everything you know now will be useless in five years. I remember it distinctly because I, in my youthful naiveté, just couldn’t believe it to be true. While it still seems a tad over-simplistic, as the years have rolled by and I look back on my own career, I can see that maybe it wasn’t that far wide of the mark. Way back in the ‘80s, I trained for four years to become a fully certified draughtsman. With Rotring pen and stencils in hand, I learned a vocational skill that surely would serve me for a lifetime. But within a year, the skills that I had spent so long honing were rendered superfluous with the introduction of AutoCAD. I had just been introduced to digital disruption and had to re-learn my trade on software to remain in the game. Jump to the ‘90s and I was working in Telecoms, where wave after wave of new technology replaced previous versions within a few years: E&M to DASS, ISDN to ADSL, pagers to cell phones. Then to the 2000s, when the teams I worked with at Canon were constantly driving new cycles of innovation to remain competitive in an evolving business landscape: cameras jumped from film to digital, standalone photocopiers became connected MFPs, paper shuffling morphed to digital processes. You often don’t even see it when you’re caught up in the momentum of an era, but the bottom line is: You have to keep moving to stay ahead. At Enterprise World 2015, an all-encompassing program of training and education is available to those seeking to stay ahead of the digital disruption curve. There’s something for everyone, from end users to developers to LOB leaders to executives interested in best practices in Enterprise Information Management strategy and driving user adoption. Looking for insight on the nuts and bolts of extending ECM into back-office lead applications? We’ve got that. Developing an architecture to maximize web and social user experiences? That’s here, too. The list goes on and on. Personally, I’m looking forward to attending the full-day training session on Auto-Classification, a technology that I believe will have an exponential impact over the next few years as enterprises strive to organize and extract value from the massive amounts of content they control. But that may not be your cup of tea. Take a few moments to ask yourself where you want to be in five years. I’ll almost guarantee there’s a training session to help bring it one step closer at Enterprise World 2015.

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Data Driven Digest for September 25: US Map Potpourri

In his book, How the States Got Their Shapes, author Mark Stein notes that many of the lines that separate us are arbitrary at best; based on historical negotiations and treaties with other countries. It’s not uncommon for communities to be split down the middle of two states just because an 18 Century surveyor identified a geo-spatial line. Do the lines separate us or do our behaviors? We ask this because this week’s Data Driven Digest focuses on three maps of the United States that are distinct more because of the behaviors of the people that live in them than the actual lines that separate them. Enjoy! You Want Fries With That?: If you are hungry for data, our friends over at DataBucket serve up a hot dish of information. An interactive map based around prices at Five Guys Burger and Fries restaurants tracks prices on four items available at the restaurant: Bacon Burger, Fries, Bacon Cheeseburger and Hot Dog. It’s no surprise that a meal in Midtown Manhattan costs nearly $3.00 more than one in Kansas City, Kansas. The map is novel, however, in that it displays data gathered by using Five Guys online ordering website. The 29-year-old chain currently has 1,000 locations in the United States, Canada, Britain and United Arab Emirates with 1,500 more under development. There is one item available at the restaurant that is priced consistently. All roasted in-shell peanuts found in the dining area are free. No Debate: With several months to go before the 2016 US Presidential election, we’re taking a look at some early returns. Washington Post writer Philip Bump (@pbump) notes that the upcoming televised Presidential debate in St. Louis, Missouri will be the fourth such time the city has hosted a presidential or vice presidential contest in the last 56 years. Bump suggests the St. Louis bias may come from the familiarity with host Washington University of St. Louis as well as Missouri’s past swing-state status. The Post’s visualization’s auto-build is quite impressive. You can clearly see the 28 states that have yet to host the marquee stump. Three other sites slated for next year include Dayton’s Wright State University; Farmville, Va.’s, Longwood University; and University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Startup Funding Nation: Silicon Valley startups get a lot of attention from venture capital firms, but how much is much? Our friends over at DataBucket used datasets from CrunchBase drawn from Github and built it into an interactive map that tracks the average funding amount and number of companies for each state and funding round. The wealth distribution weighs so heavily in California that the second largest state for funding (New York) is nearly a quarter of the investments flowing into the Golden State. While any state can spawn startup seed money (yes, we are looking at you South Dakota) emerging venture capital hotspots include Florida, Texas and Massachusetts. Startups are big money. VCs invested more than $48.3 billion in 2014 according to data released by the National Venture Capital Association. That seed money supported upwards of 4,356 deals. Series A funds are typically used to get a company going, while successive funds are used to help grow the business. After receiving $1.6 billion in early funds, Uber is currently locking into place a $2.8 billion to expand. Elon Musk’s SpaceX grabbed a $1 billion-dollar cash infusion valued at a more than $10 billion. Recent Data Driven Digests: September 18: Original US Congressional debt, Euro spending, and world population based on income September 11: Cloud visualizations related wind, bird migration and El Niño September 4: Seasons represented by fall color, energy production, wildfire smoke, air pollution  

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Exploring iHub Examples: Integration Framework

This post is the second in a series exploring the free example applications that come bundled with OpenText Information Hub (iHub), Trial Edition. Read the first post here. The ability to integrate and embed data within other applications is an iHub strength. This ability is particularly interesting to independent software vendors (ISVs) who want to embed analytics in their applications, and it’s thoroughly demonstrated in the Integration Framework example application. Once you launch iHub, Trial Edition and open the Examples, click on the Integration Framework image and you’ll see the Mashboard screen below. (More about that name in a bit.) Mashboard What it is: The first screen you get when entering the Integration Framework example application is a modern tile-style page – one with a few surprises up its sleeve. What to look for: Some attractive visuals are immediately apparent, such as the subtle animation when you mouse over the four boxes at the top of the page. But to ISVs, more important is the way the page is constructed: the charts, maps and tables are created with iHub, but the boxes that contain them are created by the application itself. ­(That’s where the name Mashboard comes from – the page is a cross between a mashup and a dashboard.) All of the visualizations on the page are interactive, and the minus/plus icons in the upper right of each tile in the dashboard let you minimize or maximize the individual visualization independently of the others. To explore the other Integration examples, pull down the menu icon at the top left corner of the page next to the words Sample Application. You’ll see five choices: Reporting, Analytics, Web Tools, Charts, and Embedded Code. Select Reporting. Reporting What it is: Three different reports – Sales Order, Worldwide Sales, and On-Demand – that show iHub’s ability to generate and integrate reports. What to look for: Each of these reports illustrates different strengths and integration capabilities, so let’s look at them individually. Sales Order Report (shown above) combines infographic-style presentation of key metrics, a comparison bar chart, and two interactive tables of data. The lower right table uses an inline bar chart for each record (in the Actual vs Target column) as well as a red/yellow/green scorecard presentation for numbers. Click on any salesperson’s name and you’re taken to a dashboard for that individual. The first page of this report presents aggregated data, and subsequent pages give detailed reports. (Page navigation is found in the upper-right corner of the screen; it’s cropped out of the screenshot above.) Go to one of the subsequent pages, Enable Interactivity (as explained in the previous Examples post) and you’ll see that these aren’t ordinary static reports. You can easily sort data in the tables, hide and rearrange columns, and otherwise fine-tune the reports’ appearance and performance to suit your needs. Worldwide Sales (shown above) is a report organized as a grouped table. Each page of the 20-page report presents data for a different geographic area; note how the infographic header changes as you click through the pages. The Order Status column uses a scorecard-style color code, so the type color changes depending on the displayed text. On-Demand Report, when you first select it from the menu, appears as a nearly blank page. Choose an item using the pull-down Parameter Picker in the upper right corner, click Run Report, and iHub immediately generates a detailed invoice for the customer, like the one shown above. (This is not a static page, but rather is a generated report.) Incidentally, iHub uses its JavaScript API (JSAPI) to display the parameter picker; significantly for ISVs, the JSAPI parameter module and iHub’s viewer module are integrated seamlessly on a single page. Analytics What it is: A dashboard with four tabs – Inventory & Sales, Cross Tab, Performance, and Other gadgets. What to look for: Each tab shows a different way that data can be integrated and displayed in a dashboard. We’ll consider each option individually. Inventory & Sales dashboard showcases iHub’s treeview control. Explore the selectors along the left side of the dashboard; you can make selections, click Apply, and watch the graphs change. You can select any combination of whole countries and cities within countries; when you do, notice that the additional selectors at the top of the page (Cancelled, Disputed, etc.) also change according to the available data. Hovering over elements in the charts causes detailed figures to pop up, as seen above. Cross Tab demonstrates that you can build a dashboard that contains a cross tab. (It sounds simple – and with iHub it is – but not all dashboard-creation products have this capability.) Selectors on the left side of the dashboard enable you to filter the data that is presented in the cross tab Performance shows a variety of simple meters and thermometers, based on data picked using the selectors at the left of the dashboard. Don’t like the appearance of a meter? Click on the meter, click the triangle on its upper right corner, and select Change Type to see what options are available. (Developers control what other chart types are made available to users when the dashboard is created.) Other Gadgets shows how you can embed a live web page – in this case, our own developer site — into an iHub report. This capability exists because many business dashboards also must provide portals to external data and content. Web Tools What it is: A direct link to iHub tools for building things: Dashboard, Interactive Crosstab, Report Studio, and My Documents. What to look for: The four options here allow you to experiment with the visual developer tools that come with iHub. There’s too much here to highlight in a blog post, so keep the iHub documentation and tutorials handy as you explore these examples on your own. But one thing you can easily do, even without reading the manual, is to compare the user interfaces of the Dashboard builder and Report Studio. You can also check out the many types of data visualizations that come with iHub, shown above. (We’ll talk more about your data visualization options in the next section.) Charts What it is: A collection of data visualization examples, both native to iHub and built using third-party technology. What to look for:  These visualizations are grouped into four broad categories: Lines – Columns/Bars, Pies – Donuts, Other Visualizations, and 3rd-Party Visualizations. On the Lines – Columns/Bars page, note that the three visualizations across the top show the same data in different formats. This illustrates the fact that choosing the correct visualization for a given situation is not always easy. Same goes for the Pies – Donuts page; the same data is presented in a number of different ways. To learn more about choosing the right data visualization for your needs, see 8 Tips to Big Data Visualization and UX Design, featuring a video of our own Mark Gamble discussing data visualization best practices. The Other Visualizations page shows six other data visualizations that come out-of-the-box with iHub, and the 3rd-Party Visualizations page presents just a few of the JavaScript-based visualizations that iHub can bind data to and render. Your options here are almost limitless; learn more about using iHub Custom Visualizations here. Embedded Code What it is: Three examples of how you can add code to iHub content to increase the content’s functionality and improve its appearance. What to look for: The first Embedded Code item, JQuery, shows how a few lines of JQuery code can be used to enhance standard iHub tables. The left table has extra highlighting (here’s a blog post explaining how that’s done), and the right table demonstrates one-click expand and collapse capability. In both of these cases, the report tables were developed using iHub’s standard table tools, and JQuery code was applied after the fact to provide a different interactive experience. The second Embedded Code option, GoogleMap, shows how a familiar map format can be embedded and integrated into an iHub application to provide location intelligence. The quickest way to see how data from iHub affects the map is to right-click the State column, choose Filter, and then set the Condition as Equal To CA. The map will zoom in on California and only show entries for that state. The final Embedded Code item, Custom ToolBar, changes the Sales Order Report that we explored earlier by replacing the standard menu pull-down and the page navigation selectors with versions that better match the report’s overall style. Again, this is accomplished with a few lines of code, and shows how seamlessly iHub visualization and reporting can integrate and blend with your own content. Next Up In our next blog post in this series, we will explore the SF Wealth example application and demonstrate some iHub capabilities particularly well-suited to financial institutions. Subscribe (at left) and you’ll be notified when that post and others are published.  

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See Big Data Analytics in Action

Not since the mashup of chocolate and peanut butter have people been so excited about two great products that fit great together: Analytics and the Cloud. Earlier this month, OpenText announced Big Data Analytics in The Cloud,  an all-in-one software appliance built for business analysts that need to access, blend, explore, and analyze data fast without depending on IT or data experts. The need for Big Data Analytics should be obvious. Businesses need to understand their data requirements. They need to digest hundreds of tables and billions of rows of data from disparate data sources. With a powerful analytics tool on their side, companies speed up their time to value with the ability to integrate data from multiple sources to get a single view of their business. No complex data modeling or coding is required. They can clean, enrich and analyze billions of records in seconds and apply advanced and predictive techniques in a visual, intuitive way. But seeing is believing. This is why we have assembled a demonstration video that shows just how Big Data Analytics works and some scenarios that may mirror your own needs. Check out the demonstration here: And if you are interested testing out Big Data Analytics yourself, we have also a free trial available.  

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Explore: You are on the Fastest Route

website testing

In my previous blog I discussed using OpenText™ Explore to find the true source of the problem you are trying to solve. On this journey, as in any journey, it’’s critical to know where your starting point is. Now let’’s talk about the other important piece -– getting to the destination. After all, in the words of the great Yogi Berra: ““If you don’’t know where you are going, you will probably wind up somewhere else”. Once you have identified the true cause of your problem, you can design a solution to eliminate the cause and resolve the problem. This is your destination. Now, thanks to OpenText™ Explore, you have a clear picture of where you are starting from and where you are going. So how do you get the fastest route? Most would agree that the fastest route to your destination is a short, straight line, and of course, the shorter and straighter, the better. So now is a great time to look at how close the destination really is. I have spent some time here discussing solving problems as a journey, but what if your journey just turned into a treasure hunt? What if you have a solution in hand already? You just need to find it. After all, things can’’t be complete chaos, can they? In the contact center, there are always bright spots: agents who meet or exceed your expectations regularly and processes that are working well. Once you know what you need to do, Explore can help you find the strengths in your organization to leverage as a solution. By using Explore to find the agents that are closing the sale, handling calls efficiently, applying promotions that are being mentioned, or upselling strategies that are working, you will find a ready-made, nearly instant solution to your problem. Utilizing those agents that are exhibiting exceptional behavior and skills, you can create a mentoring program. This will bring several benefits: Recognition for agents that will serve as your mentors Agents, managers, and trainers all become vested in the solution Agents who are not performing up to standard can be given real-world behavior and situations to emulate Informal training (mentoring) is an extremely affordable method for agent improvement Retention of existing employees is preferable to advertising, interviewing, hiring, and training new employees Obviously the fastest route will always be the shortest. The best route is the one that is easy to navigate and of course, affordable. What solutions do you have readily available? Has mentoring been an effective method for “leveling up” your staff? Let me know in the comments.

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Data Driven Digest for September 18: Money and Finance

This week marks the 133 anniversary of the opening of the Pacific Stock Exchange in San Francisco. The establishment was created to serve the interest of businesses that struck it rich mining for gold during the California Gold Rush. Nowadays, businesses mine for data hoping to strike it rich by analyzing that data for clues about how to best serve their customers, streamline their operations, or gain a competitive advantage. In honor of those financial pioneers, this week we offer three different visualizations of financial data. Eureka! U.S. Fiscal Responsibility   In 1789, the United States established its first loan to pay salaries of the existing and future presidents and the Congress. As our friend Katy French (@katyifrench) posted in Visual News this week, bean counters in Washington kept great records and even produced stunning visualizations to represent trends. The graphic above represents the Fiscal Chart of Debt and Expenditures by the U.S. Government between 1789 and 1870. Note the spikes in military spending during the War of 1812 and Civil War as well as the first major accumulation of debt in 1861.   Euro Spending How do Europeans spend their paychecks? That was the premise of a recent data plot developed by The Economist (@TheEconomist). Based on data sets from Eurostat entitled Final consumption expenditure of households by consumption purpose, The Economist found life in the Euro zone is quite diverse. Living in Lithuania? Your budget is dominated by food and clothes. Lithuanians also spend more per capita on alcohol and tobacco than the rest of Europe. Meeting in Malta? Forget about eating at home. Nearly 20 percent of Maltese spending goes toward restaurants and hotels. Spaniards spend the least on their transportation. Germans spend more on their furnishings than their E.U. neighbors   World Population Based on Income Our friends over at Pew Research Center (@PewResearch) have come up with an interactive visualization based around the paradigms of income and how it relates to world population. For example, the map above shows the density of people living under what they term as a middle income. By middle income, that means your daily wages are between $10.01 and $20. According to the map, 13 percent of the 7+ billion people in the world are middle income. The map has a second option that reveals the percentage point change in that population between 2000 and 2011. It’s a fascinating study on both financial statistics as well as data maps. The income groups are defined as follows: The poor live on $2 or less daily, low income on $2.01-10, middle-income on $10.01-20, upper-middle income on $20.01-50, and high income on more than $50; figures expressed in 2011 purchasing power parities in 2011 prices.

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Digital Engagement: A New Business Requirement

Digital engagement isn’t an option anymore, it’s a requirement. Today’s consumers are savvy and fickle, and companies must work to earn their loyalty. They’re demanding more from the brands they love, and their tolerance for anything but a seamless, engaging, and compelling experience is flagging. In a digital world, organizations must digitize their customer journeys, from initial interest through to purchase and follow-on service or support. The best way to do this is to shift to a digital marketing strategy. One that creates consistent and compelling customer experiences at every touchpoint through omni-channel delivery, responsive design, and targeted communications and information. Digital technologies have introduced new customer touchpoints and increased opportunities to engage. Since consumers often use more than one channel to interact with a brand (in some instances they use five or six), delivering uniform and relevant messages across all channels is crucial for return on marketing investments and customer satisfaction. Omni-channel focuses on meeting consumer needs by pulling together programs to provide a cohesive brand experience across channels, platforms, and devices. To borrow from Bruce Lee, digital design should “be like water”. You put water into a cup, it becomes the cup. You put water into a bottle, it becomes the bottle. You put water into a teapot, it becomes the teapot. The same holds true for digital experiences. The transition from desktop to device to point-of-sale should be fluid. This is achieved through responsive design. Customers don’t see individual devices or channels; they look for a consistent and familiar brand experience that delivers relevant content. Nirvana on the customer journey is realized when a company anticipates the needs and wants of a customer and serves up targeted and tailored content, products, or services, in the moment of need, wherever the customer is. Organizations that can predict customer behavior have a better chance at fulfilling consumer needs. Analytics—or analyzing data collected across various touchpoints of the customer journey (transactions, interactions, social media sites, and devices) helps organizations discover valuable customer insights so that they can offer more personalized and satisfying experiences. The most effective way to target different audiences is to use messages that focus on products and services with the greatest appeal for each segment. Using dynamically generated customer communications, organizations can create and automate their marketing campaigns. When correspondence is part of a digitized process, end results are gains in efficiency and the ability to create superior customer experiences. As one of the foundational suites for Enterprise Information Management (EIM), Customer Experience Management (CEM) aims to create a richer, more interactive online experience across multiple channels without sacrificing requirements for compliance and information governance. CEM brings together all of the technologies required to re-architect back-office systems, consolidate customer data, and create digitized front-end experiences. Digital engagement starts inside the firewall and extends outside the enterprise and all along the supply chain. In the next post in this series, I’ll explore how the supply chain is being disrupted and how enterprises can digitize key processes for greater collaboration, information exchange, and business agility. Find out how you can capitalize on digital disruption. To learn more, read my book, Digital: Disrupt or Die.

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Exploring iHub Examples – First in a Series

There’s a big-box retail store not far from the OpenText Analytics office in San Mateo, California. Some of us (ahem) have been known to visit there at lunchtime to score free samples for lunch. And why not? Most people like to get something of value for free. If you download the 45-day free trial of OpenText Information Hub (iHub), you know the feeling. Not only do you get to try out a full-featured version of the software for free, but you’re also given a number of free sample applications that preview some of the software’s remarkable capabilities. To help you steer your cart around the wide aisles to find the good stuff, we have prepared a series of blog posts exploring what each sample apps is and what you should look for when you use it. We’ll count on you to imagine how the capability it demonstrates could be used in your organization. One other thing: You and your development team can learn a lot more about how these sample apps are constructed – and how they work – by exploring them in Analytics Designer, the free companion design tool for iHub. Brian Combs has published a step-by-step guide to help you do this. Finding the Samples When you launch iHub the first time you’re greeted with a main screen showing just one item: an HTML file called Examples. Click on it and you’ll see the Sample Content screen below – it’s your jumping-off point for all of the samples. (screenshot) The first sample we’ll explore is labeled Other Applications and can be found in the upper-right corner of the Sample Content screen. Click it and you’ll see three sample visualizations and one dashboard.  These samples (and others) are based on Classic Models or SF Wealth, two of the sample databases that come with iHub. They all present data in a clean, uncluttered format that invites further exploration. Customer Revenue Metrics What it is: A report with a bar chart, a table of top customers (with scorecard arrows showing trends), and pie and bar charts that break out revenue in different ways. What to look for: All of the elements of this report are interactive, so alter them to see what happens. For example, you can change the date range in the bar chart three different ways: by clicking the Zoom setting (upper left), by typing dates in the “from” and “to” boxes, or by moving the slider below the chart. (Modify one of these controls and the other two change in response.) Now click on any bar in the top bar chart for details on a single month. Next, hover over any segment of the pie chart; when a data point pops up, click on it for more detail. Client Investment Portfolio What it is: In essence, this is a periodic statement – like the one you might get from your investment advisor or broker – on steroids. What to look for: This report is an ideal place to explore the power of iHub’s Interactive Viewer. Click the menu button in the upper left corner of the report and select Enable Interactivity. Then click on %Change (the sixth column) and extra controls will appear to filter, sort, and otherwise modify the table. You can use these to sort the entire table based on a single parameter. (When you do this, the right column of the table – with its red and green tags that display the data in scorecard style – will sort accordingly.) Enabling Interactivity unlocks a wide range of capabilities that vary depending on the data or visualization you’re working with. One other thing: click the name of one of the stocks in the portfolio (such as Coca Cola Company), and a new tab will open with the Yahoo Finance page for that asset. This shows how reports in iHub can seamlessly connect with external assets. Top Sales Performers What it is: A ton of data about salespeople, presented in a compact, efficient format. What to look for: While your eye may be drawn to the radar chart at the top of the first page, a sales manager might find the sub-tables under the chart more compelling. These tables demonstrate how complex, multi-layered data can be aggregated and organized in a number of different ways: The salespeople are ranked, and their total sales are calculated. Within that level of organization, each salesperson’s top customers and top products are listed in order. This type of consolidated, interactive information is invaluable to people who manage large, distributed sales forces. Customer Sales Dashboard What it is: A basic interactive dashboard of sales data. What to look for: One big distinction between dashboards and reports is the presence of selectors on dashboards. In this simple example, the selectors are on the left, labeled Sales Territories, Customer Countries, and Year. Click on any element within those selectors and watch the data visualizations (also called Gadgets) on the dashboard respond. Now look at the Historical Revenue Analysis gadget in the lower right corner of the dashboard. If you find it difficult to distinguish between individual data lines in the graph, click the triangle in the gadget’s upper-right corner and choose Maximize. The graph now fills the screen for easier exploration. Next Up In our next blog post in this series, we will walk you through the example called Integration Framework. Geared toward ISVs, this example showcases various capabilities iHub provides for embedding content within an application.   photo courtesy of Sarah Murray

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Follow up to my CCNG Blog: Leadership and Celebrating Mentors

EDI

Following up on my recent blog about my experience at the CCNG Executive Summit and the topic of leadership, I had shared the following list of characteristics that a successful leader must demonstrate and possess: Clear and concise communication Active listening Decisive Transparent Sympathetic and empathetic Ownership Accountable Motivation Other-centered Authentic Several years ago, I was part of a group of mid-level managers to be selected for an executive mentor/mentee program. We were the first group to go through this newly launched program which spanned for one year. I wrote this poem below to thank all of the mentors for their wisdom, knowledge and helping us become better leaders and become better people. The Path “Good thoughts and actions can never produce bad results: bad thoughts and actions can never produce good results.” – James Allen We came together a year ago to foster learning, What we learned was the answers are not always clear, You helped us to look within, You helped us manage our time, You helped us address conflict, You helped us with risk-taking, You helped us to be authentic, You helped us to keep balance between work and family, You helped us influence, You helped us focus The struggles we faced were few, Calendars, Preparation, Time, Lack of openness, By sharing your lives you helped us know That fear of the unknown and the future Is only within us and is not ours to control It goes away when you allow us to share it. Though possibilities around us are boundless You helped us define the boundaries That would give us a direction to start in Knowing that the journey is endless. You listened and gave us signs like those on a highway, At times we needed to refuel our thoughts and our emotions, You provided us the rest stop, We thank you. The path is still within us to define, We have and will preserve with your guidance, Yet the path still lies ahead of us, We will have to choose the path but you have given us many presents to help us along our quest. For this, we thank you. I was very fortunate to have this opportunity and as a way forward, I have mentored quite a few of my friends who were mid-level managers and who have advanced much further along in their careers. Being a leader when things are going well is easy; it’’s when things are not going well that truly test you as a person.

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Mapping a Path to the Cloud

testing program

You’ve decided to start solving some business problems with cloud and hybrid-cloud systems.  But where do you start? Like all new business models, cloud computing should be researched, and then a planned and pragmatic approach should be adopted.  There are many benefits such as agility, cost savings, relief of resource pressure and flexibility, but which areas of the business should be the starting point for a major cloud project? Follow the Benefits One of the ways to start thinking about options is to look where your organization can find the greatest value. Consider starting with systems that need attention and business processes that need significant optimization or to be reinvented.  Some systems that have been in place for a while and live on premises may be working just fine and those can be left alone. Where can your business gain the most by making a strategic change in systems?   Are there areas of the business where you want to change processes and/or systems?  These are a good place to start. Where do you need to move quickly – to be innovative and outpace your competition?  More and more often organizations are turning to the cloud to drive agility and innovation. Information Matters It is often said that “information is power”.  That has never been more true than in the age of digital.  As organizations look at what business processes and systems to bring into the cloud, they should consider the information that resides in or flows through those systems.  In many cases this will drive a decision on the type of cloud or hybrid cloud application to embrace for managing this information. Axis of Control How much control does the organization need over this data? Is it subject to a high level of regulation? Do they need to ensure it remains within a given geography? Some types of enterprise information by definition need to be under tighter control by the IT department.   There may be privacy or other regulations that require you to keep strict control of information.  Conversely, there are other types of information that your organization wants to share with the public or at least to share in a controlled way.  Perhaps it is information that needs to be accessed globally and made available on a variety of devices around the world.  There is a broad spectrum of control enterprises need to have for their information – and it is different for each organization. Level of Importance As a corporate asset, consider how important the information is when looking at implementation options. How important is the information to the organization? Is it the“secret sauce” in the organization’s business? Is it mission critical? Whether or not the information is something the organization wants toshare externally, the information asset could be critical to the long-term health of the organization.  Consider the case of a technology provider and the programming code for their applications, or a moviestudio and their investments into media assets.  Those information assets are critical to the organization.  There may be no legislation,data sovereignty or regulation issues related to that information butthey are vital assets to the long term health of the company and must be treated as such. Information Grid Analysis When taking both the Axis of Control and the Level of Importance into consideration, organizations can look at their systems and the information that resides in them and plot them on the axis. Those systems with information that is both low in corporate importance and requires a low level of control are likely candidates to implement in cloud or hybrid cloud. While these use cases vary foreach organization, an example here might be a public website. The organization puts out information that can be openly shared – in fact is meant to be openly shared (or perhaps password protected for amember population), and this type of information is likely not subject to a lot of regulation and control requirements. At the opposite end of the spectrum, on the top right, are systems with information that is both vital to the organization and highly regulated.  Examples of this include patient records in a hospital system or financial records in a publicly traded organization. The level of importance of this information does not prevent the information from being part of a cloud or hybrid cloud implementation but they do help to define a level of vigilance that is required in choosing the cloud provider, the system and the Service Level Agreement for the application.  And they help to indicate which systems and information may be the easiest start points for cloud implementations. Pilot before Plunge Starting with a pilot project makes considerable sense so that staff and all parts of the organization can learn and adapt to new ways of working.  You can measure the benefits and learn before taking more complex or critical workloads into the cloud. Putting in place an overall cloud strategy and a well thought out cloud plan will help you to realize the full benefits of the cloud.Consider key drivers for your organization, review the kinds of information you are managing and what controls it requires, understand the information risk, and develop pilots to test and assess your cloud plan.

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Explore: You are Here, but Where is Here?

call center

In my previous blog, I said that one of the two critical pieces to any journey was knowing your starting point. In this post I am going to look at how OpenText™ Explore can help you determine where the real starting point is. You are here Before the path to a destination can be charted, there needs to be a defined starting point. Likewise, before the solution to a problem can be found, there must first be a defined cause of the problem. Just as it wouldn’’t be a good idea to take off on a journey without knowing where you are starting from, you will get just as lost trying to solve a problem without knowing the real cause. And this is where the journey truly begins, and where Explore becomes invaluable. But where is here? Often I deal with customers who are tasked with solving a problem only to discover that while they can identify the problem, they aren’’t really sure where the source of the problem actually lies. For instance, the call center manager who wants to know why average handle time (AHT) is up 15 %. On the surface that’’s an easy one; agents are taking longer to complete calls. The problem isn’’t really that AHT is growing, the real problem is what is causing it. The questions you should be asking are: “Why is it taking them longer?” “Is it every type of call?” “Is it every agent or only some?” “Are these sales or service calls?” “Is this related to a new product launch, a mail offer, or a news report?” “What kinds of questions are the agents getting?” You get the picture, or at least you will, as you get the answers to these questions and probably many more that are running through your mind right now. Combing through hundreds, or even thousands, of hours of calls looking for your answers is extremely labor intensive, costly and time consuming. You can use Explore to analyze the content of your recordings, as well as social media feeds, news articles, survey results, blogs, CRM data (and almost anything else that contains what you’’re looking for). With Explore, you can navigate your way through thousands of bits of data quickly and know exactly where the source of your problem lies with a fraction of the effort needed to do it manually. Once you know where ‘here’ is, you are ready to begin your journey. Have you ever tried to solve a problem, only to realize you didn’’t know what the real issue was? Leave me your questions or feedback in the comments section.

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ARC Advisory Group Discusses How Enterprise Information ManagementSupports the Digital Manufacturing Business

Over the past 12 months I have posted a few articles discussing how Enterprise Information Management (EIM) supports today’s manufacturing business. During this same period, manufacturers have had to embrace various forms of digital disruption, from technologies such as wearable devices, 3D printers and the Internet of Things. In addition to these new technologies, today’s CIOs need to embrace new types of network infrastructure, new devices connected to these networks and new forms of digital information coming off of these devices. These technologies are not only transforming the manufacturing industry but more importantly they are transforming how we manage, share and utilize digital information across the manufacturing enterprise. Deploying an effective EIM strategy should be at the heart of any manufacturing operation, especially as digital information is required to support a product from ‘cradle to grave’. This end-to-end approach to managing enterprise information can provide a strong competitive advantage in the market as well as significantly improve customer satisfaction levels. In order to see exactly how digital information supports today’s manufacturing process, OpenText commissioned the ARC Advisory Group to write a white paper looking at how manufacturers should be leveraging an EIM strategy to manage digital information flowing across a manufacturing enterprise. Manufacturing a product, whether a car, television or aircraft, consists of many sequential processes and rather than trying to boil the ocean in terms of how information is managed at every step of a manufacturing process, I asked ARC to focus on five of the more important steps. These steps are highlighted in orange on the diagram below and are found in nearly every manufacturing sub-sector. ARC provides a strong argument as to why EIM is important for supporting today’s connected manufacturing business and it also provides a firm foundation for embracing new disruptive technologies in the future. The white paper is available to download from the resources area of our manufacturing page on our website, or you can download directly by clicking here. Over the next few weeks I will be finalizing a solution brochure to expand on each of the five areas highlighted in the ARC paper, but until then please feel free to download this new white paper from the link shown above.

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Introducing OpenText Big Data Analytics in the Cloud

testing program

Digital leaders know their data. They convert their information into actionable business insight. Considering that more data is shared online every second today than was stored in the entire Internet 20 years ago, it’s no wonder that differentiating products and services requires advanced tools. With that need in mind, I’m pleased to announce OpenText Big Data Analytics in the Cloud. Combining the power of our OpenText Big Data Analytics product with the accessibility and convenience of the Cloud gives our customers the ability to leverage advanced analytics capabilities quickly and easily, without investing in infrastructure or specialized technical staff. All About the Data To transform data into insights, organizations require a Big Data Analytics solution that is flexible enough to integrate all types of information, including survey results, tweets, purchasing data, campaign response rates, and external market data. An effective solution helps organizations examine all data in a single view, analyze billions of records in seconds, and apply advanced and predictive techniques—all via an intuitive, easy-to-use interface. Applying analytics to information across organizational silos gives businesses the insight they need to improve their performance, optimize their supply chain, and know their customers better. Big Data Analytics gives organizations the agility they need to compete. With benefits like these, my question is “Why haven’t more organizations implemented Big Data Analytics solutions?” The most commonly cited barriers to adoption of Big Data Analytics solutions are difficultly consolidating data sources, a skills gap within the organization, and lack of infrastructure, or difficulty integrating with existing infrastructure.[1] Not every organization has the data scientists, IT experts, and computing resources they need to collect, parse, compare, and extract value from data.   The OpenText Answer The new OpenText Big Data Analytics in the Cloud bypasses all of these barriers, offering implementation and full management in the OpenText Cloud, without requiring the customer to acquire additional IT resources or infrastructure. As our first “Analytics as a Service” (AaaS) offering, OpenText Big Data Analytics in the Cloud brings together the benefits of advanced analytics with the cost-savings and convenience of a managed service, making it even easier to access, blend, explore, and model big data quickly and effectively. The simplicity and flexibility of Big Data Analytics eliminates the need for a data scientist. The power of OpenText Cloud lowers technical and financial barriers to entry. Without lengthy procurement and installation processes, time-to-ROI is realized sooner. Maintenance is simplified and scalability is improved without driving up costs. Using in-memory columnar database technology that delivers 1,000x faster performance than traditional relational databases, OpenText Big Data Analytics in the Cloud reduces the time it takes to prepare and launch campaigns, discover supplier risks, or identify business opportunities from days to just hours or even minutes. It delivers quicker time-to-value because of the proven reliability and expertise of our Enterprise Information Management (EIM) Managed Cloud Services. With OpenText Big Data Analytics in the Cloud business users can uncover cross-sell or upsell opportunities or reduce customer churn, and gain better visibility to detect fraud, analyze risk, and drive operational efficiency. What’s Next? When it comes to analyzing data, many of our customers have made great progress. They have moved from rear-view reflections to near-view observations. But the traditional Business Intelligence (BI) tools that made that move possible have become table stakes. OpenText Big Data Analytics and the advanced and predictive analytics it embodies, represents the future of business and will be the key to continued success in a Digital World as organizations shift from near-view observations to future-view forecasts and analysis to make more informed business decisions. When I look at Analytics as a Service, I see the shape of things to come. I see limitless potential. To find out more about the new OpenText Big Data Analytics in the Cloud, read the Press Release.

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Email is for communication, not collaboration

customer lifecycle value

If I had a nickel for every time someone sent me a document to review in an email, I’d have a closet like Imelda Marcos. My friend in IT often laments that attachments ever became an option for email because it has brought bloated inboxes and increased security risks along with it. But even from a business workflow perspective, email just wasn’t designed to be a collaboration tool. Documents in email are quickly outdated. If someone emails a document to three people for review, once the first person starts to make comments or modify it, the original attachment is out of date. Even if the reviewers are good about taking turns reviewing and using only the most recently emailed version, it will exist in all of their email accounts in up to four different iterations. Ensuring everyone reviews the most recent copy or merging changes and comments from any simultaneous reviews is completely at the discretion of the reviewers. Conversations and resulting decisions are not properly maintained. In a litigation event, proving who said what can be very important. Or maybe you need to prove the customer signed off on a particular change. Calling up the right file version and the right markups can be critical. Document permissions are irrelevant. To me, this is the biggest issue with emailing documents. Once an authorized user downloads a document and puts it in an email, all control over that document—and any intellectual property (IP) or sensitive information it contains—is lost. One click of the Send button can propel that document across a handful of unsecured email servers (hence the concern around Hilary Clinton’s use of her personal email account for classified communications) and to unauthorized recipients outside the organization. Don’t get me wrong, email is an incredibly useful tool, it’s just a misused one. But a combination of ECM and a proper collaboration tool solve this problem nicely. Send links to documents in the ECM system rather than sending the document itself. The Email link button in Content Suite just might be my favorite feature and is certainly one of my most used. If you need to share documents with people that don’t have access to the ECM system, Brava! can publish the file to the secure CSF format. CSF provides more control over what can be done with the file, including restricting printing and re-publishing, and can include password protection and even an expiration date. Use a tool designed for collaboration. With Brava!, markups and conversations are properly stored and managed and IP stays safely inside the firewall, seen only by authorized users. Brava! can even burn the final, approved markups into a PDF version of the document for archiving.

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Explore: Navigate Your Journey of a Thousand Miles

Explore

Journey {n} – An act of traveling from one place to another The Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu said,“ “The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step“.” Although this sounds like great advice and can be very encouraging, I have to respectfully disagree. Since a journey is an act of traveling from one place to another, I believe that the journey of any distance, be it great or small, must begin with two equally critical pieces: 1) Understanding where the journey begins 2) Knowing the destination. Starting a journey in the wrong place, or taking that first step in the wrong direction can sometimes be worse than not moving at all. And in business, not moving at all can be disastrous. This is where OpenText™ Explore comes in. Explore can show you where you are, and help you to get to your destination, even if you don’’t know where that is. In today’s fast-paced, ever-changing contact center, you are faced with challenges on a daily basis. These challenges have names like NPS scores, first call resolution, customer satisfaction, retention, and of course, big data. From the initial decision to tackle one (or more) of these challenges, to uncovering the real causes, to developing a solution that works in your environment, these can be short strolls or long marathons; sometimes the difference is in simply knowing the starting point. Explore is a powerful and robust tool for helping businesses navigate their way through the journey. Through analyzing data from a myriad of channels, you can uncover the true source of issues and identify where you are truly starting from. Over a few blogs, I am going to chart a course through some of the more common issues by looking at how Explore can help identify the root cause of these problems, and allow businesses to more quickly identify solutions. Of course not every journey is a walk through some haunted forest filled with doom and gloom. Explore is an immensely powerful tool for finding those hidden treasures as well; those skills and strengths sometimes get overlooked, because businesses are so focused on the negatives that they sometimes don’t see the enormous positives and how they can be leveraged. I will also be examining how to find those strengths and what to do with them. What has been your most important journey? Would having a navigator like Explore have helped you? Share your thoughts in the comments. Join me next time when I start the journey from, of all places, the start. Until next time…!

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9 Information Governance Mistakes to Avoid

Reliable data preservation, eased regulatory compliance, streamlined eDiscovery processes, and business continuity. With such great benefits, it makes sense that you want to get started with an archiving solution right away. Don’t dive in yet, though.. Information governance (IG) will change your way of doing business, but defining how it will be rolled out can prove challenging. Many organizations may have good intentions, but they can end up doing more harm than good. Instead of diving in head first, it’s often best to first test the information governance waters and properly ready yourself. Below are 9 of the most common mistakes to avoid when rolling out an IG program: #1 Treating IG as a one-off project Many organizations make a big deal over the launch of an information governance solution. But what happens after the initial kick-off? They often forget that an IG solution will need to be maintained and supported long after the party’s over. #2 Ignoring data quality and relevancy One of the biggest benefits of a strong IG program is increased data quality and relevancy. Too many companies implement IG technology, but don’t spend the time to manage information that is Redundant, Obsolete, or Trivial (ROT). Part of IG is giving higher visibility to the critical business data and getting rid of the ROT. #3 Not deleting ROT While instant messages with colleagues over a particular legal matter can be crucial to litigation matters, those that painstakingly plan the upcoming corporate picnic are not. Organizations often make the costly mistake of saving all of their data. This fear-driven approach can cost organizations substantial amounts of money in storage, and can create a whole lot of clutter. Having a deletion strategy is an essential part of an IG program. #4 Deleting when you should be archiving While defensible deletion is an important part of information governance, so is archiving. Often times, as data volumes get maxed, organizations start to become more “choosy” about what they keep and can start to overlook things. Ensure that the IG solution is scalable and can accommodate growing volumes. #5 Lack of executive buy-in Any information governance program impacts an entire organization, making executive buy-in an essential component for success. By implementing below C-level, the solution may not have the support, budget, or visibility it truly needs to flourish. #6 Excluding experts You wouldn’t hire an electrician to fix your plumbing, so why cause such complications in the workplace? Designing and implementing an IG solution can be daunting, so leave it to the experts. Hire consultants who are well versed in your industry and understand the compliance issues you’re facing. Typically this is money well spent. #7 Making it about compliance only While information governance is partially focused on keeping an organization in regulatory and legal compliance, making it the main focus of your program can be limiting – and boring. Get users invested in the new solution by demonstrating how it affects them individually: show how sales can close more deals, marketing can deliver products to market quicker, and how legal can proactively respond to litigation. #8 Implement technology before policy This is where testing the IG waters is crucial. If you implement technology, but don’t have the proper policies or company culture in place then organizations can see valuable resources wasted. #9 Believing you’re too small for IG All IG solutions are not created equal, but organizations of all sizes can benefit from one. While enterprise-size companies have massive amounts of data that can be overwhelming to manage without the necessary technology, smaller companies have fewer resources to manage data. All it takes is one lawsuit or rogue employee to cause irreversible damage. Instead of viewing IG adoption as a race to the finish, try to envision the process as creating culture change across the company and properly prepare yourself for the journey.

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ROI: Defining the Return on Investment for Information Governance Software

web optimization

Without hard revenues or growth statistics, it’s often challenging to define the ROI for implementing an information governance solution.  Organizations often struggle to quantify the results, leaving executives skeptical about the investment. An inherent challenge is the variety of different components that can comprise an overall information governance solution, and thus, the corresponding investment.Some of the key variables that determine your information governance expenses include: Project Management & Planning:  Who will manage the project?  Will all departments be giving input and feedback with the software solution? Number of Users: Typically the more users, the higher the cost. Programming:  Does your organization require any special features or usability requirements? Training – Training will incur additional expenses and staff time, and depend on the depth of necessary onboarding. Support – Costs related to support can vary greatly depending on whether support is 100 percent outsourced, 100 percent internal, or a combination of the two. Storage – Cost per GB may be a small initial investment, but expect data volumes and the associated cost for storage to grow. After the costs are defined, many executives want a clear picture of ROI.  The results from your information governance efforts can vary.  The ROI might actually be negative in some instances if you develop the wrong plan or implement the wrong software.  On the other hand, ROI from an information governance solution can be millions of dollars in either direct revenue from finding critical business documents, or in cost savings by avoiding damaging litigation. Below are seven of the leading places to look for information governance ROI: Implementation & Maintaining:  The upfront cost and hours spent during implementation plus the cost of on-going expenses such as hosting fees, and staffing give you a break even point for your ROI.  The lower these costs are the faster you’ll start seeing positive ROI. Storage Reduction:  The fastest way organizations start seeing ROI from their information governance efforts is an ability to stop using off-site storage, costly back-ups, and the ability to defensibly delete information. eDiscovery:  eDiscovery is a substantial financial burden, and one case can cost millions in discovery costs.  Implementing information governance can substantially reduce these costs by decreasing review times, helping you avoid legal expenses, and costly unfavorable outcomes. Productivity:  Employees spend countless hours a week trying to locate and re-create documents they are unable to find.  The time savings can have an immediate impact on ROI and effect top-line growth. Litigation: More organized and thorough data can result in higher litigation success rates. IT Resources: Information governance practices can free up the time and cost of using internal resources for archiving, eDiscovery, and overall information management. Security: Information governance can reduce additional spending on security.  It can also reduce data breaches and theft. With so many variables to consider, it’s a difficult market for buyers to determine the best solution.  Everyone knows someone who made a bad investment in the wrong technology. Even so, an archive is not a place to save money.  The difference between a $50k and $100k investment in the right technology might seem substantial, but one might translate into hundreds of thousands if not millions of dollars actualized over time.  Your information governance partner should help identify where spending needs to be made and where savings can be realized, so that ROI is not only clear, but substantial.

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Kicking Off Information Governance – the First 30 Days

Everyone is now on board with the information governance (IG) initiative you’ve championed across the organization and it’s time to get started.  With data volumes growing by the minute, it may feel like you are already behind schedule, and trying to decide where to begin is daunting. We are here to tell you the truth – kicking off an IG initiative is not easy.  With a carefully planned roadmap however, you can strategically roll out the solution with much success. Below is a basic guide to help you map out your first month of implementation, including tips to bolster your success. Week One Select an information governance committee. This group will outline the goals and objectives for the initiative, which will further define the procedures and policies set in place that govern its ongoing progress.   The information governance committee can also help establish a timeframe for rollout and ongoing maintenance. TIP: Ensure that there are key stakeholders from each of the essential business functions on the team to not only represent their respective departments, but also champion the initiative within each group. Week Two Start with small wins.  Information governance is much too large an initiative to implement organization-wide from the start.  Depending on the size and scope of the project, develop a step-by-step plan for information governance rollout that addresses one department at a time, or one project at a time.  Ensure there is a week or two between each rollout to allow room for troubleshooting, before moving on to the next project.  A few small projects to consider as starting points include: Create a training program Begin migration and retirement of old systems Start identifying and implementing technology Create a roadmap TIP: Identify areas or projects that can quickly show results. Week Three Reinforce participation.  One of the most challenging aspects of information governance is ongoing company wide participation.  Building a culture of information governance and compliance is critical for success.  It’s not an overnight process, but it’s important to keep the project top of mind and continue building momentum for the solution so it doesn’t fall off everyone’s radar. TIP: Consider building in an incentive-based reward system that links performance and participation.  Rewards can simply be recognition in the form of highlighting successful users. Week Four Establish some early ROI.  ROI will be it’s own champion for the ongoing success of the project.  Reporting positive results from the beginning will get more and more people on board and not only ease the implementation, but also support your case if and when more budget/resources are needed. TIP: Some good places to look for early ROI include: reduced storage volumes, improved eDiscovery timeframes and increased visibility.

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Why Information is the New Currency

We live in a digital world. A testament to this new reality is the growing value of digital content. People download songs, purchase movies online, exchange emails, and share personal information—all in the form of digital content. Information in its many new forms has become commoditized. In a digital world, information is the new currency. Will it replace the dollar, the Euro, the Yen? Not yet, but as information flows across networks, as it is exchanged and more metadata is collected, it grows in value. New businesses and whole industries are emerging to support the digitization of content. As industry leaders like Google and Facebook have demonstrated, opportunities to monetize information are abundant. Like money, data can be stolen. As information grows in value, so will the need to protect and manage it—and this will be increasingly mandated by governments and regulatory bodies. Many large companies (health care providers, governments, and banks, to name a few) are the gatekeepers of highly confidential, personal information. They are susceptible to information leaks. In a digital world, how will government and regulators monitor and protect the huge amounts of personal data stored in the Cloud?  As society becomes digital and the Internet propagates a faster pace of crime, organizations will need to focus on the development and enforcement of governance policies, standards, and systems to prevent identity theft and online fraud. The mass digitalization of products, services, processes, and overall business models will demand a disciplined approach to managing, governing, and innovating with information. Enter Enterprise Information Management, or EIM. EIM is a set of technologies and practices that maximize the value of information as it flows across networks, supply chains, and organizations. Its core technologies work together to create an end-to-end platform for sharing, collaboration, analysis, and decision-making, based on the effective management of information to harness its potential while mitigating risk through governance, compliance, and security. EIM delivers a long list of benefits for the enterprise, including reduced costs, increased transparency, improved security and compliance, optimized productivity and efficiency—but the overarching benefit that EIM gives to organizations is the ability to simplify their operations, transform their processes and information, and accelerate business and agility to innovate at the speed of digital.  In a digital world, information will play a fundamental role in empowering the enterprise. Digital leaders will differentiate their products and services based on a strategy that maximizes the potential of digital information. They will use EIM technologies to connect information for better performance, greater opportunity, and deeper insight into their customers. I’ll take a closer look at how competitive advantage is created through managing consumer-related information in the following post in this series, “Digital Engagement and the New Consumer”. Find out how you can capitalize on digital disruption.  To learn more, read my book, Digital: Disrupt or Die.

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