Information Management

CCNG Executive Summit: Leadership for the new Workforce

customer experience

From the desk of Dr. WFO: On August 3-4, I had the opportunity to participate with a number of great organizations at the CCNG Executive Summit in Fort Worth, TX. Several organizations were represented at the event including: Neat, Kohl’s, HSN, Essilor, Hilton, CareerBuilder, Chase, Texas Workforce Commission, Wells Fargo, Kroger, OpenSpan, InContact, Five9, T Rowe Price, Uhaul, Intradiem, McKesson, Aspect and Ucare. During the two days, we had great open discussion covering various topics impacting the customer experience. I was impressed that the organizations were willing to share their knowledge, passion and dedication in serving their employees and their customers. One of the topics discussed was the value of leadership. As the mature workforce retires and the Millennials and the Gen-Z continue to contribute to the workplace, it is important that leaders continue to evolve by growing and learning the necessary skills to motivate the new workforce. In my career, I have had the opportunity to work with all types of leaders and want to provide my thoughts on the characteristics of a great leader:  Clear and concise communication Active listening Decisive Transparent Sympathetic and empathetic Ownership Accountable Motivated Other-centered Authentic In upcoming blogs, I will provide detail to each of these characteristics, so stay tuned. If you are not currently a member of CCNG or haven’t attended a regional CCNG event, I highly encourage and recommend you make the time. Have your supervisors, team leaders, managers, and individual contributors from your contact center attend the regional events. Developing your employees and future leaders is well worth the investment. If you want to learn more or view upcoming CCNG events, visit their website.

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Data-Driven Experiences ARE the Future

digital disrupt webinar

The Digital Experience market space today is being driven by Marketing and the CMO, however, the pendulum is likely to swing back toward the CIO and technology teams to help provide better insight into the success of digital transformation projects. Age of the Customer We have entered a digital world of consumer-centric business. Customers expect experiences that are personalized, contextual, mobile. In two words; Everywhere they need to be and Anytime they desire. There is no time or place that a Customer, Partner, Knowledge Worker, Employee, does not need to have efficient access to the information and services that they need or want. Role of Marketing and Data The essence of Marketing is to differentiate the value of products and services in the mind of the customer (buyer). Since every Customer is a unique person, each Customer is a micro-market of one. This means that organizations must be able to differentiate their products at a 1:1 level with customers at all times and in every context. Marketers have always been data-driven, but Big Data tools are enabling marketers to segment and predict behavior at a finer level of detail. As a result, there is no aspect of a customer experience that cannot be differentiated to achieve better results. For this reason, Marketing’s role is responsible for carrying out the mission to differentiate an organization’s value and in turn, this means that they will be responsible for influencing and messaging into every customer touchpoint. Data as Critical Ingredient to Digital Experiences Data tools are becoming more sophisticated and real-time, which enables reliable, high-quality data to be applied dynamically in any experience. From mobile devices coupled with geofencing technology to kiosks and wearable internet-connected devices, it is now possible to combine real-time knowledge of customer information (identity, history, preferences) and customer context (presence, local conditions, bio-feedback) with predictive analysis to deliver the highest value experience to a customer. For example, it is now entirely possible, data privacy aside, to know that Customer X has entered the NYC Macy’s department store from the 34th Street entrance and is standing in the Men’s Shoes section. Customer X has an elevated heart rate and it is raining outside. They just made a purchase in the store that included a rain jacket and have now re-entered the store. Therefore, something is probably wrong and the first objective should be to send an associate to meet Customer X at the entrance and ask how we can help rather than push promotions to this customer’s mobile device. In order to accomplish this, technology must provide the necessary services, including: Collection of any available/allowable data that may be needed as context Analysis tools to process the data into synthesized actionable outcomes Real-time Integration with experience delivery systems to create the dynamic experience for the customer, on any channel/touchpoint Decision support tools (data visualization/BI) giving business users the ability to find customer patterns, extract insight and optimize the experience The end goal of data-driven Marketing is to optimize the differentiated customer experience. Leading the Organization to a Data-Driven Enterprise The Enterprise is made up of individuals, who are each Customers in the global marketplace. The expectations and norms of Enterprise are heavily influenced by the Services they expect as consumers. Therefore, there is an unavoidable link between Marketing and IT as the service-provider to the Enterprise. The work of the Chief Marketer is to understand the needs of customers and how to optimize a differentiated experience for the most efficient commercial results. As a result, Marketing is leading the way to using data to optimize experience, and is training the same people who work in the Enterprise what to expect from their Enterprise systems. Because Marketing is directly linked to creating top-line revenue, the CMO will have the greatest mandate to operationalize data-driven, personalized experiences. As a result, the solutions created for Marketing and the Customer Experience will increasingly, and for the foreseeable future, act as the model for optimizing the Enterprise Experience. The CIO has the opportunity to connect, not only the marketing activities of the customer at the early stages of the relationship, but also offer the customer a connected experience across the sales and customer service departments as well. The CMO can deliver Data-Driven Customer Experiences and the CIO can enable a Data-Driven Enterprise. Data-Driven Experience as a Strategic Objective With the acquisition of Actuate, OpenText has identified the Data-Driven Digital Experience as the next evolution of the Customer Experience originally driven from the marketer’s initiative. Smarter experiences will be driven by analytical insight and tailored recommendations. B2B, Government and non-profit groups will also begin to adopt similar initiatives to improve the user experience and refactor their technology platforms to address the expectations of a digital native culture.

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Hyperion Research Cites OpenText eDOCS as an Advanced Solution Provider for Legal

I’m pleased to announce OpenText eDOCS has received esteemed ‘Advanced Solution’ designation from analyst firm Hyperion Research, including special recognitions of Market Leader and Highly Innovative in a number of key capability areas for Enterprise Content Management (ECM) solutions. Naturally, we are thrilled with this accolade from such a respected source in the legal community. And, our pleasure is compounded by how they define an Advanced Solution provider. Not only does an advanced vendor have strong market share, financial stability, a consistent flow of enhancements, and a strong record of client satisfaction, but they also demonstrate “significant strength in both product functionality and overall solution capabilities”. This last point is weighty when you consider the seismic impact digital technologies have had on the legal profession of late and the extent to which their information needs have evolved and expanded. • Over 65 percent of legal organizations manage more than 1 million documents each, with volumes that are growing at approximately 30 percent annually. • Email volumes are exploding and will eclipse document volumes in the next few years. • Matter content has expanded to include a variety of new file types (rich media, audio and video content, and more). • Content is stored in “silos” across the organization on shared drives, Microsoft SharePoint sites, and in cloud-based document repositories. • Two thirds of legal organizations report that less than half of their total content is captured by their DM. This unwieldy situation is pushing many legal organizations to the point of inefficiency and making them vulnerable to security and compliance risk. Technologies for ensuring integrated, managed, secure, and easy-to-access content remain critical. But it’s not doom and gloom, not in the slightest. These same technologies also offer incredible opportunities to make legal operations more flexible, efficient, productive, and profitable. • Mobile access to matter-centric content can bring increased flexibility and productivity to your legal staff. • Analytic technologies offer business intelligence to improve your processes, better serve your customers, and grow your business. • Digital business processes not only reduce the cost of managing paper, but streamline operations ensuring the correct version of content is routed, securely maintained on file, easily accessed, and disposed of in accordance with records policies. • Tight integration with third-party applications allows information to flow across the organization while governed and secure. According to Hyperion, these expanded capabilities are critical to information management and “legal organizations are actively seeking solutions that directly address these historical deficiencies in integrated approaches.” The information management needs of legal organizations are changing. Systems once deployed to create a secure and efficient home for company information must now evolve to address the challenges and opportunities of the digital world. They must provide the legal profession with a complete, innovative, and integrated set of capabilities to manage, govern, and harness their matter-centric content to better serve clients and bring full value to business operations. eDOCS is pleased to be recognized by Hyperion as an Advanced Solution provider with “product functionality and overall solution capabilities” that address the evolving needs of the legal industry and help legal professionals respond to the challenges and opportunities presented by the digital world. The full report is available for download on the Hyperion website, and the eDOCS summary is available here. For more information, visit our web content or contact us.

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5 Ways to Simplify eDiscovery

CX

Many organizations are failing at keeping up with their unstructured data. Legal and IT are finding themselves dealing with unmanaged data growth, often making eDiscovery a monumental task that eats up valuable resources. With legal and IT budgets being constricted, it can be hard to manage rising and unpredictable eDiscovery costs. Being proactive, rather than reactive is key. Below are five ways you can simplify the eDiscovery process and substantially reduce cost. #1 Avoid Legal Jargon Legal holds are meant to be acted upon by employees. In order to streamline the eDiscovery process, legal and compliance teams need to understand how employees talk and the issues related to their documents. Draft your legal hold notices in a way that everyone can understand so they know what to do, and fully understand expectations. #2 Anticipate Risk While you may be tempted to cross your fingers and simply hope no disputes arise, anticipating and planning for potential risks can prove to be very rewarding. Data and documents can be categorized based on potential risks, such as trademark disputes, with all corporate naming and branding documentation stored in a separate location. If and when litigation arises, your preparedness will pay off. #3 Early Case Assessment Once data is properly preserved and collected, it’s extremely important to condense the information down to a more manageable size. Actively culling the the data during document review will save you more time and money during the eDiscovery Process. #4 Integrate Solutions eDiscovery was formerly a “piecemeal” solution. Separate tools such as early case assessment and document review functioned as software packages which demanded the risky business of information transfer. Integrating all eDiscovery components under one platform is not only the safest route, but the simplest as well. #5 Hire Experts An eDiscovery solution provider can best advise and consultant clients through the assessment, selection and implementation processes. These experts can help you anticipate and plan for issues before they arise, and should essentially become an extension of your internal team. I think what it all boils down is being proactive. eDiscovery costs are substantially reduced when you’re readily prepared for an eDiscovery request by implementing the right tools and team. Asking for advice now and implementing technology might save you headaches and hundreds of thousands if not millions in eDiscovery costs and potential litigation disputes.

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Digital-First Fridays: Operating at the Speed of Digital

It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change. – Charles Darwin We live in a time of unprecedented change. In every sector, digital technologies are changing the rules of business by enabling new business models. Startups are reshaping entire industries, combining technologies like cloud, social, mobile, and analytics to deliver more targeted customer products and services. These technologies are empowering organizations to bypass the traditional costs associated with barriers to entry and connect directly with consumers to meet their needs. Startups are disintermediating the market leaders. Over the next five years, executives expect digital disruption to displace four out of ten incumbents—or 40 percent of established market leaders.[1] This is a startling prediction. Part of the reason why this will happen is because startups are able to operate and scale at a very fast pace, innovating very quickly—a pace that larger incumbent organizations (with their legacy systems) can’t match. This is the speed of digital and its potential is uncharted. With more people connecting and sharing ideas in a global, digitized marketplace, the pace of innovation will only increase exponentially. The formula is ten times the innovators at one-tenth of the cost and 100 times the power. Digital Disruption is Stronger and Faster[2] In a Digital World, the development of new products will evolve from sprints to hyper-connected dashes. Product features will be crowdsourced and collective. Feedback about consumer experience will be collected to upgrade features, improve delivery, and serve niche markets—in real time—removing the developer “safety net”. Every single disgruntled consumer will tell 1,000 potential customers about a bad customer experience. Brands will be built up and destroyed on social networks. Product ideas will be shared across yottabytes (one trillion terabytes) of data and millions of people, as innovation cycles are faster, compressed, and even approach the spontaneous. Business Models are Advancing Disruptive technologies are fueling a subscription-based economy. As business moves to the Cloud and mobile access becomes pervasive, the requirements for on-demand services are deposing the mainframe in enterprise infrastructure. Digital innovators are focused on creating exceptional experiences for the digital consumer and benefiting from a lifetime of customer value. As product experiences move to new platforms, companies are measuring their value based on recurring metrics over one-time metrics. In a Digital World, organizations will have to embrace digital disruption or they face the risk of losing market share or becoming obsolete. They will have to disrupt or die. To keep pace, organizations will have to reinvent themselves. They’ll have to digitize their information and operations. They’ll have to innovate at the front end to capture the mindshare of digital consumers and modernize their back offices to integrate their operations more efficiently across the supply chain. And they’ll have to restructure their IT departments to support a digital workforce. They’ll have to operate at the speed of digital. All of our customers have embarked on this journey of digital transformation. Here are a few examples of how they are disrupting their business using the Cloud, analytics, process automation, and mobile computing to simplify their volumes of information, digitize their operations, and accelerate opportunities for success: Mitsubishi Motors is outsourcing its B2B e-commerce capabilities to the Cloud and achieves stronger integration with its suppliers in Europe, without making additional investments in headcount or software. Dell Services is setting new standards of excellence within the IT services industry. Using analytics has helped them drive positive change, increase value, and improve engagement with organizations worldwide. First United Bank is using a BPM solution to help it achieve its goal of going paperless. To date, the Company has digitized over 200 processes and converted over 2.5 million documents and images into digital format for considerable business improvements, including overall growth and customer satisfaction. The City of Barcelona has a comprehensive digital strategy that embraces delivering more targeted and mobile services to its constituents, based on the innovative mobile identification system called “mobileID”. Find out how you can capitalize on digital disruption. In my next post in this series, I’ll explore what it means to function as a digital business. Read my book, Digital: Disrupt or Die. [1] “Executives Expect Digital Disruption to Displace 4 in 10 Incumbents by Industry within Next Five Years,” Webwire, June 24, 2015, http://www.webwire.com/ViewPressRel.asp?aId=198501 (accessed July 2015). [2] James McQuivey, “Digital Disruption: Unleashing the Next Wave of Innovation,” Forrester Research, Inc., 2013.

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Insight to Action: Chicken or Egg Conundrum in Customer Experience

customer experience

A few weeks ago, I attended the Forrester Customer Experience (CX) Conference in NYC. The event revealed an amazing turnout and energy for customer experiences that differentiate. Established brands like Virgin and newcomers like Dollar Shave Club are looking to be different. These brands also rely on insight and experiential testing to find their CX sweet spots. In one instance, Virgin spent months designing a hotel room until they realized they overlooked the importance of a well-lighted and functional vanity for female guests. After we presented to over 100 people on how Marketing Optimization drives revenue and retention through engaging customer experiences, the post presentation Q&A made it clear that firms were lacking tangible insights to drive the experience. It seemed to be a conundrum much like the chicken and the egg: How can I get insights if I am not confident in what I am testing in the first place? How can I get insights if I am stuck in a one channel world? How can I get insights if I am not confident of what I should even be testing? They lacked knowledge as to what to present, and that lack of knowledge clearly wasn’t able to overcome experience inertia. I asked the group what insights they had gleaned from one channel to help inform another channel. Crickets. Even with a specific example such as, What have you been able to learn from your contact center teams to better inform your online experience?, it quickly became clear that many attendees were thinking only about one channel at a time. And I was talking to companies that you would assume would be in the forefront of multichannel analytics. Was it their culture or their technology holding them back? I asked. More crickets. Being able to share the capabilities of OpenText™ Qfiniti workforce optimization (WFO) with its companion product, OpenText™ Explore, with these companies was thrilling. I was able to explain how these Marketing Optimization solutions enable companies to look across channeles to find insights to use in other channels, such as web, call center, mobile, and storefront. Qfiniti and Explore accelerates the path from information to insight, paving the way for action. It is not good enough to be “good enough” in one channel any longer. In conclusion of our speaking engagement, we left the audience with three things to think about: 1 – Can you get to your data 2 – Can you mine it for insight 3 – Can you act on the insight What about you? How do you go from insight to action? Do you do it manually or with the help of a platform? And are you able to look across channels for actionable insights?

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Hey, Coach! Getting Started With Contact Center Coaching

contact center

During my visits with various contact centers, the word “coaching” is often used in conversations with management. However, it isn’t always clear what coaching actually means. A good operational definition of coaching is: Taking the time to develop a person’s skills by teaching, communicating, and measuring their success To begin applying any definition of coaching, you have to approach it with discipline and have an appreciation for the value it brings to your employees and the company. That said, you must make the time to prepare for coaching, set aside time for regularly scheduled coaching sessions, and develop ways to track individual performance improvements. On the surface, this sounds simple, but in the dynamic, real-time environment of a contact center, this can prove to be a daunting endeavor. And, if you’’re like most contact center leaders, your plate is already full, so any new addition will come at the expense of an existing activity.  The key? It starts with an investment commitment  Whether you are an experienced coach and simply looking for new ways to improve, or in the beginning stages of establishing a formal program, you have to be honest with yourself, your company and your employees with regard to the amount of time you’’ll actually have to dedicate to coaching. If you have 10 direct reports and are spending less than 10 hours of every week on coaching activities, you’’re not investing the time needed to do it effectively and in ways that will provide real returns for your organization. There are several reasons why people say they can’’t dedicate 10 hours every week to coaching, and some are very creative, but in many cases, the reason they can’’t spend time coaching is simply because they haven’t become accustomed to doing so. And, when you’’re not successful, you end up spending a lot more time explaining why you’’re not successful, thus taking time away from the activity that makes you successful -– growing your people through coaching. Applied to the real time contact center world – when the metrics aren’’t there, we spend a lot of time trying to fix the metrics at the expense of spending time with agents. Thus begins a cycle that is hard to break. Get the buy-in from senior management for a coaching program and the time that is needed.  A professional basketball coach needs his front office to back him up; the same applies in the contact center. This is no simple task, and it starts with looking to your own team of peers, – getting them all on board and spending some time together talking about different approaches to coaching, the benefits of spending time with the frontline, the potential return on the time investment and the impact on the enterprise’s bottom line, and what things would need to change to make more time for coaching. You’’ll most likely find that just about every leader could make time for coaching if there were fewer administrative type activities… and what you’’ll also find is that if these activities were “pooled” (similar to the what you do with the inbound contact center workload), tremendous efficiencies could be gained. Next, turn your attention to the other results, and document all of the wins for the company by moving the administrative tasks from leaders and providing them with time to develop their “teams.” Starting a contact center coaching progam starts with investment. It’s as simple as that. Stay tuned the second and third installments in this series for more coaching tips.

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New Forrester Report Cites OpenText as having “the broadest ECM backbone for enterprise applications”

The latest ECM analysis from highly respected Forrester Research has been released, and OpenText has been recognized as a leader in their evaluation of the most significant ECM software providers. Now, that’s always great news; our ECM solutions are consistently ranked at, or near, the top in every analyst’s reports, and we work very hard to ensure our offerings deserve that designation. But this one’s different. What’s special about this Forrester ranking for me and the rest of the ECM team here is the area of focus for this report. Entitled The Forrester Wave™: ECM Transactional Content Services, Q3 2015, this new analysis concentrates specifically on the field of transactional content management, in our view, the ability of ECM platforms to integrate with the lead applications that drive back-office business processes and help organize, extract value, and apply governance to the huge pool of information and data they generate. It’s an emerging priority for many organizations, and Forrester has deemed it worthy of its very own report this year. It’s also been a long-standing focus for OpenText, and that’s why we’re so thrilled to be recognized as a leader by Forrester. We’ve believed for some time now that organizations won’t be able to make the full transition to becoming successful, streamlined digital enterprises if they’re still trapped in a world of silos and isolated information. A wide variety of our customers (a couple of case studies are here and here) are now realizing the benefits of embedding ECM into their business processes and fully utilizing their transactional content to drive value and productivity. So, what is this “transactional content?” It’s the seemingly endless river of information that fuels enterprises; the invoices, statements, applications, communication, onboarding, and more that mostly emanates from sources outside the enterprise and has been traditionally ingested through a variety of isolated systems‑BPM, HCM, ERP, CRM, and others. There’s a lot of it within most enterprises, it’s highly structured, and it contains a significant percentage of their knowledge capital. For years, this information has generally been acquired, used to trigger an immediate process or task, and then been relegated to its respective repository. If it’s needed again, one-off access usually involves time-wasters like screen flips, log-ins, convoluted queries, emails, or even phone calls and walks down the hall‑not exactly productivity central and nowhere near good enough to efficiently paint the whole picture of a case or transaction. What’s more, there’s often been very little in the way of standard governance practices applied to the information housed within these processes. The answer lies not in extracting that information and transferring it to another repository, but in bringing organization, intelligence, and agility to it right where it’s sitting. By embedding the inherent organizational and governance strengths of ECM solutions into operational standbys such as SAP®, Oracle®, Microsoft®, and Salesforce®, organizations can tie them together and create a holistic, cross-enterprise information flow. After all, these lead applications are where all the action takes place, where the knowledge workers do their jobs, and where the value created by this information can be best used. Why not keep it all there? The newest generation of ECM offerings has the analytical, auto-classification, and integration capabilities to bridge the silos isolating each of these applications, facilitate a seamless information flow, and build a single, unified view of a transaction. Users effortlessly see everything they need, when they need it, efficiency and insight skyrockets, and all involved are way more responsive and productive. We believe that Forrester has acknowledged the growing importance of this strategy. We also feel that the fact that they’ve recognized OpenText as a leader is validation we’re on the right path.

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If a Customer Falls in the Forest, We’ll Know

A few weeks ago, I had to take my car in to be serviced. After a busy day at work, I rushed to the dealership only to discover that the service desk closed at 5:00pm. It was 5:09pm when I arrived. Frustrated after a long day, I stood there with a hopeful expression on my face. The man behind the service desk looked from me to the clock on the wall as I braced myself for the “Come back tomorrow” that I was certain was coming. But then, to my happy surprise, it didn’t. Instead, the man asked me what I needed fixed on my car, and told me he’d do it for me right away. Although the repair was minor and only took about five minutes, the result of this simple act was monumental: it turned my day around and left me as a happy customer. It also made it more likely that I would return to this dealership for future maintenance—and to purchase my next car. Turning Negatives into Positives We all know that it only takes one negative experience to change your perception of a company, but did you know that it can take up to 12 positive experiences to make up for one bad one? Based on my personal experience, the car dealership started their relationship with me on a positive note, and that’s something I’m not likely to forget. At OpenText, we know that our customers are our most valuable asset and we work hard every day to ensure that you’re getting the most out of your OpenText solutions. The OpenText Experience One of our favourite sayings is, “If a customer falls in the forest, we’ll know”. On a basic level, this means that we’ll always be there to lend a helping hand or listen to your concerns. But on a deeper level, this idea has infiltrated our entire organization. From Human Resources to IT to Customer Support, each and every OpenText employee has a role to play in helping to create an exceptional customer experience. To help us keep all of our customer experiences positive, we follow these four simple tips from Vision Critical: Listen to our customers: Listening is one of the most importantcomponents of creating a great customer experience. By listening to our customers, we’re better able to understand where they’re coming from and are better equipped to help them succeed. Take their ideas seriously: When a customer has an idea on how to fix an issue, or how to do something to best fit their needs, it’s important to consider them. By working together with our customers, we try to ensure we arrive at the best solution to fit their unique set of needs. Engage with your customers on an ongoing basis: As a Communication major and an avid social media enthusiast, this one is particularly important to me. Having open, two-way communication with our customers on an ongoing basis is critical to developing and maintaining a positive relationship. Whether you’re contacting us by telephone, email, social media, or in a one-on-one meeting, we’re always available to chat. Act on changes: Once we have identified changes that need to be made, it’s important that we execute on them. Talking about issues with our customers is important, but unless we act on those changes, nothing improves. We know that sometimes it can be difficult to turn a negative experience around. But by listening to our customers, investigating the best possible solution, and working diligently until the issue is resolved, we turn a potential negative experience into one that will be remembered—for the right reasons.

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Will Apple’s Watch Transform How Companies Interact With Their Supply Chains?

If there was one company that has contributed the most towards mobilizing today’s enterprise, from a smart device point of view, I would have to say it is Apple. Interestingly Apple has been able to achieve this with hardly any dollars being spent on enterprise marketing activities, instead, the trend of allowing employees to connect their own devices to corporate resources has allowed Apple to effectively own the Bring Your Own Device, BYOD, market. BYOD has transformed how employees engage with corporate resources and it has also driven the need, in Apple’s case, for the development of IOS specific apps to integrate to back office enterprise applications. Shortly after the original Apple iPhone was launched in 2007 I posted a blog discussing how I thought the iPhone would transform how companies interact with trading partners across a supply chain. Wind the clock forward eight years, no pun intended, and here we are again with yet another device that is set to transform mobile communications, Apple’s Watch. The Apple Watch has received mixed reviews from, consumers, enterprises and analysts and yet the sheer groundswell of companies developing apps for the Apple Watch will certainly make it a success in the near future. For example one of the biggest uses for the Apple Watch will be utilising NFC payments through Apple Pay. A nalysts are already making predictions for the technical specifications of Apple Watch 2 and so enters yet another Apple product that will get consumers excited every year when a new version of the Apple Watch appears. I cannot think of any other high tech brand that has been able to build such an expectation for each product launch. From a wearable device point of view, if last year was the year of Google Glass then 2015 will be remembered as the year of the Apple Watch, a device that is going to be receiving the full muscle of Apple’s marketing department to make it a global success. So given everyone is currently trying to define enterprise level use cases for how the Apple Watch will add value to a business, I thought I would wade in with my own ideas, from a supply chain point of view. I thought it would be interesting to highlight where I believe the Apple Watch could potentially play a part in interacting with B2B platforms and trading partner communities. I will stress that the ideas discussed in this article are mine alone and not the opinions of my company OpenText and we currently do not have an Apple Watch project of this nature being developed, but in the future who knows? So in the future it may be possible to access our Enterprise Information Management (EIM) suite of solutions, albeit in a very simplified capacity through a wearable device such as the Apple Watch. For arguments sake I will call this ‘myEIM’ to imply that these solutions are being accessed via a wearable device. The icons shown on the screen below represent the key EIM solutions that OpenText offers today, the latest one, through our recent acquisition of Actuate, (highlighted for the purposes of this article by the red icon), is related to analytics. From the main screen I will choose the icon representing the Information Exchange (IX) suite, shown in green, you can see that all other icons are hidden to leave just the one that I am interested in viewing. When you select the IX icon you are then taken to the ‘my IX’ suite of tools that relate to B2B and supply chain management. You will notice a number of options from the my IX menu shown below. Let’s briefly review each one in turn.   One of the challenges faced by procurement or purchasing teams is having real time access to contact information relating to every trading partner across their supply chain. Using information pulled from the central B2B platform it will not only display key contact information but also key information relating to a trading partner’s B2B connectivity. For example how many transactions do they process and which communication protocols do they use. This may seem like really basic information to capture, but when you have a trading partner community of 5000 suppliers, the ability to quickly search through trading partner contacts becomes very important. Once you have found your trading partner contact you may want to initiate a chat session with them to help address a specific issue. If I had responsibility for managing a trading partner community of 5000 suppliers then I would like the ability to be able to communicate or broadcast to the entire trading partner community through a simple to use chat tool such as this. The concept here is no different to Apple’s iMessage utility for sending short SMS type messages. OpenText recently announced the launch of Trading Grid Analytics to allow companies to monitor all transactions flowing across our B2B Trading Grid infrastructure. (For the record we process 16 billion transactions across our B2B network each year). But what if you could review these analytics results on an Apple Watch? OK so the presentation of the analytics based information would need to be highly simplified to make it usable on the Apple Watch but it provides a great way of monitoring key analytics such as transactions by trading partner or transactions by document type etc. The next area where the Apple Watch could be of value, for the purposes of this article at least, is in the area of tracking orders. Knowing the status of purchase orders as they go through the approval process and then being able to track by orders shipped, perhaps by customer location, is incredibly valuable to a company. Any exceptions or errors with an order can be immediately highlighted within the app and the user would be notified of a potential problem by simply vibrating the Apple Watch on the user’s wrist. Colour coding of information based on specific criteria or threshold values provides immediate feedback to the user. A clear benefit of a wearable device such as the Apple Watch is having access to a suite of highly graphical apps. For example simply overlaying shipping/distribution information over a standard map application such as Google Maps helps to give a visual location of shipments and Apple Watch could vibrate as and when a shipment reaches its destination. Clearly you may not want the watch to vibrate for every shipment delivered to a customer, but for high value goods such as cars it could help to ‘enhance’ the logistics management experience.   One of the challenges faced by suppliers is ensuring that their customers receive their Advanced Ship Notices (ASNs) on time or within the specific delivery window, for example 15 minutes. Many automotive OEMs rate their key suppliers on their ability to deliver ASNs efficiently as they are critical to the smooth running of Just in Time production systems. In this case you could potentially use the iWatch to highlight when ASNs do not get through to the required destination. The watch would vibrate to highlight a potential problem and then offer options to address the issue, perhaps launching an alternative delivery method for the ASNs. The key thing here is that you have been notified in real time of a potential problem with an ASN and you can take immediate action to rectify the situation before it impacts your customer’s business. So just a few ideas to get the ball rolling but like all forms of new technology I think it will be a while yet before enterprise IT teams start to fully embrace the power of the Apple Watch.

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Compliance violations for faxing and Windows Server 2003 users

If your organization or users are still using Windows Server 2003 after July 14, 2015, be prepared for the consequences. Since Microsoft will end support for Windows Server 2003 this month, anyone still using Windows Server 2003 is at risk of a security and exposure breach. Malware and cyber threats can go undetected in unsupported operating systems, which alone is a huge risk for organizations. However, did you know that these risks also put an organization in danger of non-compliance with several regulations such as HIPAA, PCI, Sarbanes-Oxley and others? Running unsupported operating systems, such as Windows XP, might be enough to make the Federal government take a closer look at organizations which are bound by these important regulations. This non-compliance translates to any fax server infrastructure that may be running on Windows Server 2003. If you have a fax server deployed with Windows Server 2003, take a deep breath, and call OpenText. If you need an on-premises fax server running on either Windows 2008 or Windows 2012, we’ve got you covered. Or eliminate the need for any operating system for your faxing by using OpenText Fax2Mail, an enterprise-grade, 100% cloud fax service. We can do that, too. Either way, don’t let your operating system put your faxing operations at risk of non-compliance. For more about the end of support for Windows Server 2003, find more information here!

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Introducing Digital-First Fridays

Today, I’m happy to kick-off our “Digital-First Fridays,” a new blog series that describes a Digital-First World, provides strategies for transformation, and shares best practices using real-life examples. The series is based on our recent book, Digital: Disrupt or Die, authored by myself and OpenText Chairman, Tom Jenkins. In every sector, digital technologies are changing the rules of business. Startups and web-based companies are using digital business models to disintermediate the established market leaders. To remain relevant in a Digital-First World and gain a sustainable competitive advantage, organizations will be required to transform themselves into digital enterprises. Digital transformation requires a radical overhaul of enterprise strategies, processes, products, services, and relationships. Enterprise Information Management (EIM) empowers organizations to make this journey. How? At a basic level, it guides them through each phase of transformation, giving them effective ways to simplify, transform, and accelerate their business. 1. Simplify. Every organization wants to simplify its business. This is a constant challenge. Part of being a digital enterprise involves digitizing your information and automating your processes. In a Digital-First World, you can expect all of your business’ processes to be digitized. Automation will be critical—new research shows that nearly half of all jobs over the next two years could be automated.(1) As business evolves, we’ll rely more and more on machine-based or artificial intelligence, sensors, pattern analysis, and connections between all of these, brought together by the Internet of Things (IoT). Most organizations are already working toward simplifying their operations, indicated on the diagram below as “Present Day Followers.” 2. Transform. Business processes need to be agile to adapt products, services, and operations as customer expectations change—and they are changing. This requires transforming information-based processes and platforms to support digital consumers, a new workforce, a digital supply chain, and emerging technologies. To do this effectively, organizations will need to create an environment in which innovation thrives. Business and technology leaders should be ready to take risks, lead digital strategies, and define new models of engagement. Be ready for a substantial shift in culture to one that’s built on openness, innovation, and trust. Business problems should be examined and new processes created to solve them fearlessly and with imagination. If your organization is here, it’s already adapting to the requirements for future digitization. Building Blocks for Digital Transformation 3. Accelerate. This describes the rate at which we must undertake these changes, which may be daunting to some but, at the same time, it presents greater opportunities to serve customers, partners, and suppliers. Every organization will be required to rethink the way they’re engaging with customers, how they facilitate the workforce, and the ways they’re integrating and managing their information. The final phase of transformation relies on constant innovation. This can only be achieved by increasing the speed of information delivery through integrated systems. Digital Leaders have mastered this. They’re already redesigning customer experiences, overhauling their approaches to information management, rethinking their processes, and re-platforming their operations. Information lies at the heart of digital transformation. Its potential—if realized—is transformative. The challenge lies in managing enterprise information, making it accessible, and then applying it in new ways. EIM is the key transformative technology. Throughout the phases of digital transformation, a digital enterprise adopts EIM as its foundational enterprise platform for change. On “Digital-First Fridays” we’ll explore the future of digital technologies, their impact on the enterprise, and demonstrate how EIM equips the enterprise to brace for change in a Digital-First Future. Posts in the series will include: Operating at the Speed of Digital What is a Digital Enterprise? Information is the New Currency Digital Engagement—A New Business Requirement The Digital Supply Network Be sure to bookmark this page and join in the conversation. (1) David R. Wheeler, “Silicon Valley to millennials: Drop dead,” CNN, March 18, 2015, http://us.cnn.com/2015/03/18/opinions/wheeler-silicon-valley-jobs/?iid=ob_article_organicsidebar_expansion&iref=obnetwork (accessed April 2015).

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Happy Canada Day 2015!

On Wednesday, July 1, 2015, Canadians from coast to coast and around the world will gather to celebrate the birth of our nation 148 years ago. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Canadian flag, which was raised for the first time on Parliament Hill on February 15, 1965. Officially called the National Flag of Canada, the flag features a red maple leaf and was chosen to symbolize the many times throughout history that the maple leaf has been used as an emblem of Canada. This year also marks the bicentennial of Sir John A. Macdonald’s birth, and the 100th anniversary of the Second Battle of Ypres, where Canadian soldiers first established their reputation as a formidable fighting force. It’s also the 100th anniversary of the writing of the First World War poem “In Flanders Fields”. The poem was written by John McCrae, a Canadian Field Artillery surgeon, and continues to be one of the most iconic war poems ever written. On June 25, 2015, a bronze statue of John McCrae was unveiled in his home city of Guelph, Ontario, commemorating the 100th anniversary of the poem. Canada Day at OpenText At OpenText, we’re proud to be a part of such an amazing country. Whether we’re developing a new product, creating innovative new features for existing products, or helping to make a customer’s day better, we’re always excited to help shape the future of Canadian business. After all, we’re Canada’s largest software company. Video not working? Click here instead. Here in the Waterloo office, we celebrated Canada Day early by coming together for a Canada-themed potluck. Gathering in our Customer Experience Center, members of Global Technical Services shared a number of dishes well-known to Canadians across the country. We enjoyed smoked meat and rye sandwiches, tourtière, ginger beef (a popular dish among Albertans), Canadian-style pizza, pancakes with maple syrup, pancake-dipped maple bacon, poutine, maple pecan tarts, ketchup chips, Joe Louis’, Tim Horton’s donuts, and red velvet, maple-leaf-topped cupcakes. Among the Canada-inspired dishes were some other fan-favourites such as chick-pea curry, bacon-topped devilled eggs, fresh salad, and a cheese and meat platter. It was certainly a wonderful way to celebrate Canada Day! What are you doing to celebrate Canada Day? Tweet us your photos to @OTCC and use the hashtag #CanadaDay2015 to join in the celebration with Canadians across the globe!

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Expanding the Banking Universe with a Mobile-Only Play

Mobile phones continue to help break new ground in the world of Banking. A very interesting example is called Atom Bank, which is in the United Kingdom today, or is it everywhere? Atom Bank was recently awarded a banking license and plans to commence their operations later this year. They have already raised around 25 million pounds (about $39 million). So why is this so interesting and different? Atom Bank will operate only through a mobile app. That is right, they just have an app. Of course there will be no branches, and they will not have a website initially. This is a strange strategy as how will customers be able to find them unless they read my blogs? They claim that customers will be able to open accounts and carry out all their banking activity using only a smartphone. The also said they want to “set new standards for the banking sector” when it comes to technology. Well this matches quite well to what Millennials are thinking about innovation in banking coming from technology companies, not from banks. Viacom Media Networks did research and came up with the Millennial Disruption Index, which is copied below. Notice that 33 percent of Millennials do not think they will ever need a bank, and nearly half are counting on technology start-ups to overhaul the way banks work. Talk about supply meeting demand, and here comes Atom Bank. Or maybe they should be called Atom Software, the smartphone technology company with an app. Banking on Mobile Source: Viacom Media Research Atom is the latest in a string of technology companies shaking up the banking industry. Who would have thought that Apple would create a payment service a la PayPal? It has certainly done well so far. Anybody know a user or two of Venmo, the under 30 set’s current favorite to make small payments to each other? This is not futuristic; they already exist and work well today. So, will Atom Bank be what Millennials are longing for? Well there are a few challenges, or what we might call complexities. They will need to work with a regular retail bank for mundane things like checking and cash deposits. I don’t know if they will be responsible for Know your Customer (KYC) or will have deposit limits or concern themselves about anti-money laundering and SARS (Suspicious Activity Reports). Perhaps the brick-and-mortar bank they plan to partner with will do the heavy compliance lifting for them. Since Atom Bank is all about a high quality customer experience with a smartphone, they are certainly addressing what Millennials are looking for. They are not yet sharing all aspects of what they plan to do, as they said they do not want to assist potential competitors. They did announce that they will have biometric security, 3D visualizations and gaming technology. Sounds like fun! An app on your smart phone will do all of that? Mobile phones, now smartphones, have come a long way. Even if all of this works as planned and Atom Bank is very successful, they will have fierce competitors from startups as well as established organizations. But if they capture the hearts, minds and bank accounts of the Millennials before others do, they will be very successful and the reality of the Millennial Disruption Index will become even more obvious.

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Enterprise Mobility: Are you an Enabler?

Seventy three percent of the world’s population uses mobile phones, more than 5.2 billion people around the globe. The majority of millennials say that their smartphone never leaves their side, 24×7. This is just the tip of a mobility movement that promises to intensify in the future. How is this consumer behavior impacting enterprise mobility? Range of Mobility Responses For some enterprises, mobility means issuing cell phones to employees and ensuring the devices are managed and secured. Other enterprises load iPads and iPhones for their sales force with productivity solutions like travel planning and expense reporting. Enterprises like car rental companies and 3rd party logistics companies, have been giving their field operations specialized mobile capabilities for decades. Mobility has been embraced by the public sector as well, from social case workers to first responders to law enforcement officers, mobile solutions are decreasing response time and even saving lives. “With only a few taps on a smartphone screen magical things happen – laws, services, records and processes turn into something very simple and user friendly.” – City of Barcelona Entire business models are being disrupted by mobile. When mobile devices are integrated with critical business processes, and especially with information flows focused on the customer, mobility raises to whole new level of importance for the enterprise. Think of Uber the taxi alternative that couldn’t have existed without the upsurge in mobile. The Insurance industry will never be the same, with turnarounds for P&E claim settlement dropping dramatically with the integration of mobile. New payment approaches like Square have been spawned by mobile. And there are a whole new set of retail buying behaviors because of mobile. Superior Customer Experience The mobile experience has of course much to do with responsive web design and omni-channel enterprise enablers, but it is also being driven by the proliferation of awesome mobile apps. These apps serve up both consumer and enterprise mobility solutions. A study published by Compuware found that the majority of mobile users prefer apps over web sites; however, only 28 percent said apps offer a better user experience than sites. De veloping an effective enterprise app strategy is no longer a luxury for the mobile enterprise. I had an interesting first hand experience just this week. I am an OpenText Core user and had originally signed up and begun using it through my desktop. Perhaps I’m not totally objective, but it has a great customer experience, easy to use and great collaboration features in the cloud. Earlier this week I received a Core email notification about a document I had been collaborating on and I was mobile at the time. I clicked through the link on my iPhone and was asked if I wanted to download the Core app. I did and it was quick and easy – I was viewing the document almost instantly on my mobile and able to respond to keep the flow going. All About that App? The inflection point for becoming a mobile enterprise, as with any technology disruption, is different for different industries. What is clear at this point is that enterprises need to be mobility enablers. For now, a mix of responsive design solutions and apps seems like a good balanced approach. There will be more on the latest mobility trends and solutions at Enterprise World 2015. Hope to see you there! Author’s Note: Lest we forget… the world of mobile is not just phones and tablets, specialty devices especially wearables are also becoming an integral part of our enterprise ecosystems. Check out this post on the possible future for the iWatch and the supply chain. Image Source: Shutterstock_173233781

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Top 3 Trends for Strong User Adoption

One of the greatest pleasures in my job is when I get to meet with customers and hear how they are implementing our solutions to drive business value in their organization. As we have recently completed our worldwide Innovation Tour, I was privileged to meet with several of our customers in different regions of the world and to be inspired by their stories. One of the common topics I heard our customers speaking to each other about is User Adoption and the change management that comes with implementing a new or upgraded system. Three common themes emerged as drivers to success for user adoption in their implementations. Pride of Ownership Successfully adopted systems have clear owners who take pride in the system and their role in it. When you hear the champion for a new system talk to peers about their implementation you can see the enthusiasm in their face. The smiles come out and you can see that they have taken personal pride in the success of the system within the organization. Whether the system is operated on their premises or in the cloud is not a factor in their level of ownership. The champion (and their leadership) have a personal stake in the project and show that clear dedication to the success of the system, to achieving their business goals, and to ensuring the users have a good experience. Broad Involvement Most successful information management projects include the business stakeholders in the process from the very early stages. They are involved in creating the business requirements and in most cases are key members in the system selection team. Stakeholders from a variety of roles are included, from those that are tied directly to the business success factors, to end users. The business groups partner effectively with IT throughout the evaluation and selection stages of the software and implementation partner(s). Once the system is selected, many organizations choose a broad team to take the system through the next steps, deciding on implementation choices, user experience, acceptance criteria and so on. Many of the customers that describe adoption success have used this phase to involve a broader set of user types and departments or regions, effectively expanding their base of information and their local evangelists. One of the other tactics involves “humanizing” the system. Many have named their system, often with a name chosen through a company contest involving employees of all types. The amount of involvement they have gained up front seems to correlate to system acceptance down the road. Names the organizations choose for their system vary widely but quite often with the information systems, the chosen name reflects bringing people and information together. With the new name, decided by contest, the system now becomes a ‘someone’ that people have a vested interest in helping to succeed.

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Achieving Equal Access in Health Care Information

As per a report published by the Equal Rights Center in 2011, blind and visually impaired individuals routinely face barriers in receiving information regarding their health care including documents such as test results, prescriptions, etc., benefits information such as Explanation of Benefits, eligibility and termination information and e-delivered communications such as billing statements, summary of benefits and more in accessible formats. This includes information received by visually impaired Americans being covered by Medicare and Medicaid. These individuals are often presented with work-around solutions, such as relying on friends, family or healthcare practitioners to read their private medical information to them. Not only is this a breach of the individual’s privacy, but also leads to outcomes that could result in poor health and loss of benefits. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS), an agency of the US Department of Health and Human Services, is the largest single payer for health care in the United States. As per data from the CMS: 90 Million Americans receive healthcare coverage through Medicare, Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program. Approximately 4.3 million individuals over the age of 65 report some form of visual impairment. There are also approximately 700,000 Medicare beneficiaries between the ages of 21 and 64 who have some form of visual impairment. Private healthcare insurers have been contracted by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to offer Medicare and Medicaid programs, and these insurance providers must meet federal regulation i.e. Section 508, requiring that they ensure access to and use of their websites and digital documentation to people with disabilities, including the blind or visually impaired individuals. Non-compliance could lead to penalties and the loss of lucrative contracts for insurers. It is therefore no surprise that document (e.g. PDF) accessibility is a hot-button issue for government and even private healthcare insurers contracted by the CMS. As “public accommodations” under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), healthcare insurers are generally well aware of their legal responsibility to customers with disabilities such as visual impairment, and are quite used to complying with these regulations. But now that accessibility requirements are expanding into cyberspace, healthcare insurers need to find appropriate technology solutions for this new challenge. Until a couple of years ago, it simply had not been possible for healthcare insurers to create high-volume, communications and documents in accessible PDF format. The sheer scale of production, with documents numbering in the thousands or millions, precludes manual remediation because of several limiting factors: Costs of manually remediating documents Delivery time due to the laborious nature of manual remediation Stringent accessibility tagging requirements OpenText has created an automated, software-based solution to address these very limitations. The OpenText Automated Output Accessibility solution can generate accessible PDFs from any high-volume, system-generated input print stream or other formats quickly and efficiently, while keeping storage size at bay. The solution was designed using thousands of man-hours worth of very specific experience and expertise in the system-generated document accessibility space, and our industry-leading transformation engine enables generating accessible output in the milliseconds. In fact, the output generated from this solution has been reviewed by the National Federation of the Blind and other prominent organizations for the visually impaired. Learn more about the OpenText Automated Output Accessibility solution at http://ccm.actuate.com/solutions/document-accessibility.

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Digital Banking – What is happening in other industries? (part 1 of 3)

customer experience

The Financial Services industry as a whole – Payment and Cash Management especially – suffers from not learning and not re-using other industries’ ideas and best practices. As an anecdote, my current role focusses on one hand spending time with Banks and Financial institution, on the other hand with Corporate Treasurers. I still find myself explaining to Bankers on a regular basis procure-to-pay and order-to-cash cycles, getting surprised reactions when they realise they are just an “end” process to a supply chain process (I kid you not!). While generally speaking Banks understand their customers’ needs, individuals lack some basic working knowledge of their clients’ business or practical implications of a Banking relationship. The most regular occurrence of this “knowledge gap” I witness is around the Digital Transformation. Everybody talks about it, everyone has their own definition in Financial Services, however very few people really understand how non-Financial Institutions have already seized the opportunity. Yes, some Bankers are trying to re-invent the wheel as you read these lines. What is a Digital Business? A digital business is more than just a business with digital products that are distributed electronically: it’s a business in which digital technology is both pervasive and central to its overall success. A digital business is created using digital assets and/or capabilities, involving digital products, services and customer experiences, and is conducted through digital channels and communities. In a digital business, the majority of processes are digitized. This means that all along the value chain—from the creation of products and services to their consumption—employees, consumers, partners, and processes are reliant on digital technology for easy access to information, constant connectivity, and immediacy of insight. A digital business is characterized by an open, flexible value chain. In the transition to a digital business, organizations need to re-envision their business not as a standalone entity with a linear value chain, but as part of an extended enterprise ecosystem of suppliers from which customers assemble products and services according to their needs. Organizations need to participate in these ecosystems to deliver value to customers. By positioning products and services in the context of the customer’s value system, a digital business can grow its capabilities, leverage the capabilities of others, and open up new revenue streams. As part of a larger ecosystem, companies are more equipped to quickly pivot their operations to add customization or deliver new products to satisfy consumer need. They can scale their manufacturing capacity and shift geographies as needed to fill a specific order. In the future, these ecosystems will consist of low-cost suppliers and virtual manufacturers, be global in nature, and serve niche industries that span nations. Innovation will occur in hyper-drive, propelled forward by digital product development and marketing. Digital technologies enable new business models that are dynamic, flexible, and deliver value to both businesses and customers. Before we examine how the enterprise can reinvent itself, it would be helpful to examine the circumstances that are driving the enterprise toward digital transformation. The nature of digital technology Digital technologies enable new businesses models that are dynamic, flexible, and deliver value to both businesses and customers. Central to digital transformation is the ability to facilitate direct, peer-to-peer communication, collaboration, and sharing, without requiring an intermediary. This ability is already reshaping business as we know it. By providing direct, unrestricted access to information, knowledge, and resources, digital technologies empower individuals in ways not previously possible or even imaginable. Anyone with a web-enabled device can connect to a global network of expertise. They can discover individuals with common interests and goals. They can share ideas, collaborate, and innovate. They can band together and have their voice heard, counted, and taken seriously by those in positions of influence. And they can access new channels for manufacturing, marketing, and selling, and work with business partners located anywhere in the world. As individuals are empowered with new ways of working, traditional channels—and those who control them—will hold less importance. An inventor, for example, no longer needs to license their product idea for pennies on the dollar to a manufacturer. They can prototype the product with three-dimensional (3-D) printing. They can “crowdfund” capital costs using the Internet (collecting small amounts of capital from family, friends, or members in their online community). They can market globally through inexpensive and accessible online channels, sell through a digital storefront, manufacture small batches or distribute digitally. All this can be done in ways that are faster and cheaper and deliver new value to the customer. In shifting power and influence away from traditional sources, digital technologies are introducing opportunity to the masses. Businesses must acknowledge, respond to, and allow digital technologies to transform their operations from the inside out if they want to stay competitive and relevant in a digital-first world. Demands of the digital customer An increasingly connected consumer and the widespread adoption of digital technology has created the digital customer. Internet-based retail is growing globally at a rate of 19 percent year over year and, as more consumers move online, they are using the Internet to discover products, gather and evaluate information, and engage the buyer online for purchasing and shipping. An increasing number of channels are offering customers convenience, flexibility, and choice. They expect immediate gratification and engaging experiences that satisfy. The digital enterprise will support the omni-channel delivery of goods and services to compete and satisfy their customers. We have entered the “Age of the Customer”—an age in which digital technology has empowered the customer and shifted the balance of purchasing power from suppliers to customers. Consumers now have the ability to extract price, quality, and service concessions from the world’s most powerful brands. What used to differentiate the enterprise—economies of scale, distribution strength, and brand—have faded in importance. In their place, customer obsession is what gives firms dominance and drives their competitive advantage. For digital business, customer experience does not outweigh the need for operational excellence. In the second part of this blog, we’ll cover more drivers and practical examples of how other industries and non-Financial Services businesses approach the Digital world. We’ll cove the Generation Z, how non-FS businesses manage Operational Agility and deal with global competition and regulatory pressures.

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New Features for OpenText™ My Support

At OpenText, we’re constantly looking for ways to improve the customer experience. Whether it’s making information more easily available, providing timely updates on requests, or making improvements to the way you interact with Customer Support, we’re always looking to simplify your customer experience. Thanks to the recent updates we’ve made to OpenText™ My Support, it’s easier than ever to access the resources and information you need to manage your business and solve problems expertly and efficiently. We hope that by giving you more convenience, consistency and control, we can help you get back to what’s important. Watch our video to learn more about the new features, and take advantage of My Support today!

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How Small Data Transforms Business Today

Everyone talks about the importance of Big Data and how harnessing the power of information from a plethora of sources can be a real game changer. However, it’s often the more defined data sets that can help transform a business into a competitive powerhouse. This is considered small data, not Big Data. For example, Big Data projects typically cover a broad array of information generated from business sources such as sales transactions combined with geographical data, government data and even social media chatter. Small data, by contrast, is derived from local sources and in more digestible batches. Viewed another way, if Big Data has been largely about machines and processing power, small data is about people, context and individual requirements. And it’s transforming businesses in incredible ways. Consider the case of a lunch shop in California whose manager used her data to help increase cash flow and decrease supply costs. Lindsay Hiken, who owns the Village Cheese House (@VCHPaloAlto) in Palo Alto, Calif., began tracking various bits of known data that were important to her business: the demographics of people coming in, food supply prices, daily receipt data, and more. Companies collect data, but not many small business owners are looking at it. Hiding in those numbers could be some great strategies to make your company thrive. With the help of a small data approach, Hiken found billing and ordering errors that were wasting money, and customer information that helped her streamline her product selection to please her younger clientele. In a recent television program segment on MSNBC’s OPEN Forum, OpenText VP Product Marketing and Innovation Allen Bonde (@abonde) provided some valuable insight into how businesses large and small should be thinking about information. “This is the difference between a business that generates data, which all businesses do, and a business that is data driven where the data becomes part of the decision-making process,” Bonde related. The key to bridging the gap between having data and using it, according to Bonde, is to take a fresh look at the role of data and analytics, and apply a market-driven view informed by the needs of all stakeholders: front-line users, marketers and analysts, clients, and of course IT and development teams. Bridging the gap also requires a simplified view of the analytic process that streamlines how and where we apply various analytic techniques. Feel free to check out the MSNBC segment in the media player below. For more insight into small data and its significance for businesses, check out Bonde’s latest article, Turning Data into Insight: A Market Driven View of Big (and Small) Data Analytics, published by the Wall Street Technology Association.

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