Information Management

Why Lawyers are Adopting AI Faster Than You

AI

When you think of bold, innovative users of transformational technology like artificial intelligence (AI), you naturally think: lawyers. It’s obvious, right? Risk-averse, measured, charge-by-the-hour, brick-and-mortar professionals that parse the written word (“Heretofore? No, hitherto!”) and deliver cautious, nuanced advice (“I didn’t hear your question, but regardless my answer is: It depends.”). Who better to make practical use of today’s cutting-edge AI? (“Alexa, draft an amicus brief in support of my motion in limine. Please.”) Lest the irony be missed, the legal industry is deservedly notorious for being a technological step or two—or more—behind its clients. Yet law firms and savvy corporate legal teams have been pioneering the use of artificial intelligence since the last decade. There is not a litigator of note today that hasn’t heard of Predictive Coding or Technology Assisted Review. These terms refer to the use of machine learning to mimic an attorney’s decision-making in the context of legal discovery, the process of identifying and reviewing up to millions of documents to determine which must be produced to the other side in litigation or an investigation. Predictive Coding can mean dramatically faster and more accurate document analysis and review. Why are lawyers leveraging AI for document review? Big Data: The growing amounts and kinds of data generated by workers—in office programs, cloud apps, chat systems, shared workspaces—means an ever-increasing challenge for legal and compliance officers. To them, all of this work product is potential evidence. Bigger cost: Of the more than $200B spent on litigation across the US annually, 70% is spent on discovery, and 70% of that discovery spend goes to document review. So, anything that can accelerate or reduce review means substantial savings for corporate clients. Irrelevant content: No one likes reviewing irrelevant data. (Imagine if you had to carefully read your junk email before deleting it.) Front-loading relevant content makes document review more engaging for attorneys, which improves their productivity and accuracy. The need for speed—to insight: Over 95% of civil cases settle, as the uncertainty and cost of a trial is generally to be avoided at nearly all costs. Finding the evidence that proves or disproves your liability early on is key to negotiating a favorable settlement. Think Netflix or Pandora on steroids. Predictive Coding is about finding more like this, where this is a piece of unstructured data (an e-mail, slide deck, letter, memo, etc.) and the more like are documents that are conceptually similar—even though they may not contain the same words that made this relevant in the first place. Documents that are similar in concept but use substantially different language can be equally significant for litigation and investigations. That’s why Predictive Coding goes far beyond traditional Boolean keyword search. To enable Predictive Coding, the system performs statistical analysis on the co-occurrences of all the words in each document ingested, even across millions of documents. It then creates sophisticated models around a handful of documents judged by attorneys to be relevant to the issue under review. It looks across the data set and finds more documents closely related to those models and suggests them to the attorneys for priority review. As attorneys review the suggested documents and label them relevant or irrelevant, the system gets smarter, refining the document models for even better results in the next round. With Predictive Coding, attorneys can find virtually all the relevant content in a data set by reviewing just 10-30% of it, shaving off weeks or months of tedious review and surfacing critical evidence far faster. What OpenText is doing about it: In 2016, OpenText acquired Recommind, a pioneer in advanced analytics for the legal industry for over 15 years. With unparalleled Predictive Coding and other unique capabilities, OpenText™ Discovery Suite helps enterprises discover what matters in their data—faster and more accurately. 2017 is poised to be a banner year for legal technology, as awareness and experience with Predictive Coding are approaching critical mass. Our vision is to see machine learning used to add value to every matter, on virtually every data set. After all, who better to drive technological innovation than your venerable counsel?

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2016 was a Year of Unprecedented Change for ECM. What’s in Store for 2017?

ECM futures

Happy 2017 from all of us at OpenText! Flipping the calendar is always an occasion for a few moments of reflection and prognostication. And, as 2017 finds its footing, my thoughts keep returning to the words of one of 2016’s newly minted Nobel Laureates: “The times they are a-changin’.” In both the larger world and our smaller, tech-focused arena, change seems to have moved from constant to relentless — it’s everywhere and the pace is increasing. The impact of change can be uplifting or devastating. Some of 2016’s amazing revelations were seen in things like a robotic arm being successfully wired to a paralyzed man’s brain, the Chicago Cubs winning their first World Series in over 100 years, and Amazon making a delivery via drone. These were countered by the loss of a host of cultural luminaries, from David Bowie to Prince to Leonard Cohen, Muhammad Ali, Harper Lee, Princess Leia and way too many others to list here. And, of course, let’s not forget 2016’s biggest example of change, a certain federal election that I can’t help but filter through ECM-tinted goggles: Did a presidential candidate’s basic email governance issues alter the course of modern history? Only time will tell, but I’m thinking this point may come up in more than a few Information Governance presentations over the rest of this decade. That was just one instance where information management influenced change — and vice versa — in 2016. See below for more: Box continued to dance with the IBM elephant Hewlett Packard Enterprise continued to restructure, agreeing to multi-billion dollar deals that will spin-off/merge its Enterprise Services division with CSC and its software business (including Autonomy) with Micro Focus Lexmark was sold, with its software unit reportedly put up for sale immediately by its new owners OpenText celebrated its 25th anniversary by announcing its intention to acquire Documentum Increasingly staggering tales of data leaks and hacking garnered even more of attention thanks to everything from the Panama Papers to the Democratic National Committee to Yahoo Digital Transformation continued to expand the possibilities and expectations of content within enterprises, often resulting in a not-entirely-comfortable spotlight being turned on ECM’s history of implementations and adoption Together, these disruptors tell a tale of a sector seemingly in the throes of transition and uncertainty. It was enough for some industry analysts and experts to begin sounding the death knell for traditional ECM platforms: They’re too complex, too unwieldy, and too expensive. Maybe they have a point? More than a few commentators also raised the suggestion that the very concept of enterprise-wide content management is obsolete — the market is oscillating back towards standalone, easily digestible solutions to specific use cases rather than bulkier, unified platforms. This piecemeal approach comes with its own set of issues, though. Employing independent, niche apps for specifics like content creation, collaboration, and sharing can run counter to maximizing integration, security, compliance, and analysis. All of which are absolutely essential to realizing success in the coming years. ECM in 2017 and Beyond Future ECM success will be found in technology that can be both a platform for massive, document intensive business processes as well as a lightweight solution for integration and built-for-purpose apps. Success will be seamless collaboration inside and outside the confines of the firewall. And successful ECM will still bridge information sources, aggregating data to drive processes through contextual workspaces – all while providing the governance capabilities we still need. Critically, ECM will sneak into the background as part of applications and processes; functioning as a fully integrated, behind-the-scenes facilitator supporting productivity. Bonus points are awarded if it allows organizations to leverage the sizable capital and knowledge investment they already have in their current ECM platforms. How do we get there? OpenText has a vision for the future of ECM: Cloud-First — quickly deployed, elastic, always available, and constantly updated Independently Consumable — micro-service architecture and REST APIs make it easy to embed ECM in lead business applications and purpose-build new, lightweight apps Consumer Experience — simple, clean UIs; self-administered to maximize adoption Analytics — built-in for light-touch insight into usage, workflow, and continual improvement Repository Agnostic — stands independently or integrates with existing storehouses to eliminate migrations and leverage existing investments Application-Centric — a platform designed for the development of low- and no-code apps to solve specific business problems Can it be achieved? Yes. And it starts with the understanding that you don’t have to throw away your legacy ECM platform like an old 2016 calendar. Build on it. Start small. Aim for targeted solutions by thinking in terms of “content services”: Address your specific business needs strategically, then source and apply the appropriate technology to solve them, integrating it with the core infrastructure you already have. Whether it’s extending ECM functionality further into your business processes, enhancing content sharing and collaboration, or creating purpose-built apps to achieve specific goals, the foundation you’ll need is probably already there. That’s the key to the future of ECM; one that can be realized more quickly and successfully by fully appreciating the fact that “the times they are a-changing.”

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Westpac Bank Automates and Speeds Up Regulatory Reporting with OpenText Analytics

Westpac

When Westpac Banking Corporation was founded in 1817 in a small waterfront settlement in Australia, banking was rudimentary. Records were kept with quill pens in leather-bound ledgers: Pounds, shillings, and pence into the cashbox; pounds, shillings, and pence out.  (Until a cashier ran off with half the fledgling bank’s capital in 1821, that is.) Now, exactly 200 years after Westpac’s parent company opened its doors, it’s not only the oldest bank in Australia but the second-largest, with 13 million customers worldwide and over A$812 billion under management. Every year it does more and more business in China, Hong Kong, and other Asia-Pacific nations. The downside to this expansion is: More forms to fill out – managing the electronic and physical flow of cash across national borders is highly regulated, requiring prompt and detailed reports of transactions, delivered in different formats for each country and agency that oversees various aspects of Westpac’s business. These reports require information from multiple sources throughout the company. Until recently, pulling out and consolidating all these complex pieces of data was a manual, slow, labor-intensive process that often generated data errors, according to Craig Chu, Westpac’s CIO for Asia.  The bank knew there had to be a better way to meet its regulatory requirements – but one that wouldn’t create its own new IT burden. A successful proof of concept led to Westpac adopting an information management and reporting solution from OpenText™ Analytics. To hear Chu explain how Westpac streamlined and automated its reporting process with OpenText™ iHub and Big Data Analytics, and all the benefits his company has realized, check out this short video showcasing this success story.  (Spoiler alert: Self-service information access empowers customers and employees.) If you’d like to learn more about what the OpenText Analytics Suite could do for your organization, click here.

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Is Your Website a Reflection of You or Your Customers?

web content management solutions

“Hey Dad, did you have any feedback?” That text from my daughter last week was part of an ongoing discussion around the website that she was designing for a new business venture that she and a partner will be launching in a few months. It was the third iteration of the site, and this was the first version that was fully mobile friendly. My feedback was that with just a few minor tweaks, this iteration was very close to where they needed to be for the launch. It told a good story and provided the basic information their customers would be looking for. It wasn’t always the case. Early in the process of them developing a business case I asked my daughter and her business partner what they wanted the website to communicate. The immediate response was “We want it to let people know what we do.” A logical answer, but my response was something along the lines of “That’s great, but other people do what you do. What makes you special?” “We are focused on people with a particular problem area.” “Great. So think about the people who need help solving that problem. What are they going to be looking for?” As these sort of discussions continued, the website design and prototypes evolved from their description of what the new company did, to a series of short articles that addressed the potential customer’s problems, and how my daughter and her partner can help. They also looked at the list of services they were offering and decided to focus on the three where they have had the most interest. Now instead of a webpage with a shopping list of things to pick from, each solution article has information about the relevant service, with pricing and contact information. But it’s not only small businesses or start-ups that need to be switching their thinking from a website that, no matter how slick it’s presented, is little more than a digital brochure. Often these sort of “inside-out” websites end up being a reflection of the corporate structure accompanied by a list of products. Switching the mind set to a customer driven “outside-in” view can pay dividends, not only in an improved experience that can help customer’s solve their problems, but they can also have a direct impact on the company’s bottom line. I once worked on a project for a large company whose website was a perfect reflection of their corporate and business unit structure. You had to know what part of the company was responsible for a particular product to be able to find it; even the employees had a hard time figuring out where to find information. But a customer focused analysis showed that 80% of the traffic went to the website for just four things: to look up product specifications, pricing, buy spare parts, or get support. Once we rebuilt the website around making those tasks as easy as possible, traffic, leads, and online parts sales revenue all increased, and support costs decreased. Improving the customer experience is now regularly cited as a top strategic imperative for many companies, and the website is the always-on global showcase for that. Delivering a customer-driven web experience means not only changing the mind-set and the content, but also delivering a more engaging relevant and engaging experience that delivers value to the individual customer. It can rapidly become a complex process and needs the right sort of management tools to enable and support an effective web presence. OpenText™ Web Content Management (WCM) solutions are an open, flexible, and connected platform to solve the next generation of digital experience challenges faced by marketers and business managers. OpenText WCM brings together content, process, and applications to create and deliver optimized and personalized multi-channel interactions across the full customer journey.

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Was one of Your Resolutions Better CX? If not, it Should be

customer experience

Ever wonder why some companies seem to do so much better than others? Is there one competitor you always feel like you are chasing to catch up with? If yes, you might want to look at the customer experience (CX) you deliver and how that compares to others in your market. Many analyst firms are talking about the importance of making customer experience a top priority in a business.  Forrester Research recently released their latest CX Index findings and it continues to show that CX leaders consistently outperformed laggards in the market. So, it’s no wonder that companies continue to invest in CX. Better CX leads to a higher ROI and CX leaders tend to beat CX laggards on a number of metrics, ranging from compound annual growth to shareholder returns. CX leaders are also more likely to: Grow revenue faster Drive more purchases Dominate pricing Lower their service costs Reduce regulatory compliance risks   If you are interested in learning more I encourage you to watch this one-hour webinar. Forrester Research CX expert Margaret Rodriguez shares why CX leaders grow revenue faster than CX laggards; demonstrates how to link CX investments to ROI; discusses how to prioritize investments to continually improve customer experience and offers practical advice on how to drive  improvements. View the webinar here.

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A Duty to Safeguard Client Content

safeguard client content

We’ve all read the headlines. Security breaches continue to shock us for their magnitude and reach—from reports on hacking of Democratic National Convention (DNC) email servers during the 2016 presidential election; to the reported theft of more than 1 billion Yahoo account holders in December. The impact of a breach can be significant. And, not just for the clients—whose loss of personal information can make them vulnerable to financial loss—but also for the organizations who have failed to safeguard that information. A Measured, Disciplined Approach Digital security is complex and requires a multi-pronged approach. One part of this approach is provided by Enterprise Content Management (ECM), which many consider a “must have”—a foundational technology to safeguard sensitive digital content, while ensuring it remains readily accessible for day-to-day operations. At the core of every ECM solution is a Document Management repository—providing a secure home and a structured approach for saving, managing, and governing digital content. Content in the repository is protected by system-wide security and varying levels of more granular security. The ability to securely access content anytime, anywhere by mobile devices is key, as is the ability to check out and securely share content externally in the cloud. User Adoption is Essential Solutions for securing content are only as good those who use them—and many choose not to. Hyperion Research tells us that in the average ECM-enabled legal organization, for example, only 70 percent of users actually use the system. The rest store content however and wherever they like—on desktops, in file shares, in unsanctioned, poorly secured cloud file-sharing repositories. Ethical Reasons to Safeguard Client Content Everyone gravitates to what is easy; to the path of least resistance. In the end, however, the decision to safeguard client content can be considered an ethical or moral one. Lawyers, in particular—regardless of whether they are employed by law firms, in government, or in legal departments of organizations across varying industries—have a professional duty to safeguard client content or “property”. The American Bar Association, for example, requires that lawyers safeguard client property in their possession by holding it separate from their own property to prevent co-mingling (ABA, section 1.15). It is generally accepted that files and documents belong to the client, not the firm. In addition, lawyers must maintain client property in a way that is not only secure, but also readily available and retrievable over time. Complying with Regulatory Requirements ECM solutions are purpose-built to meet these fiduciary requirements, as well as applicable regulatory requirements—and not just for legal, but for firms in many industries. If employees don’t effectively maintain client information they may compromise ethical obligations to safeguard client property and also increase their firm’s exposure to compliance risk. In the end, those firms will have a tough time demonstrating compliance with HIPAA. They’ll have difficulty securing documents in compliance with ISO 27001, Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX), and countless other regulations. Client information is a valuable commodity and a growing target for theft. Hacking techniques are constantly evolving. Regulations are growing to protect that information. We all have an obligation to ensure the safe, secure management of client information, and with ECM solutions like eDOCS, securing content is not only possible, but easier than ever. More information is available here.

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An Account Number by any Other Name

online customer experience

All I wanted to do was give a business some money. Yet they seemed determined to make it as difficult as possible for me to pay my bill. We had received our first invoice from them as a paper bill in the mail (how 20th century!), but as we pay all of our regular bills digitally we decided to go online and pay that way. Two steps into the website process it asked for our Account Number; which was not printed anywhere on the paper bill, nor on the covering letter. A few clicks and we managed to find our account profile online. Still nothing labeled as “Account Number” anywhere. Ok we’ll pay by check this time around just to make sure it gets there. Then we saw the following note on the payment instructions: “Please include your account number on the check.” – You mean the “Account Number” that you haven’t told us? A few more clicks around the website and we eventually found an email address to send a question about how we could find this elusive number. The response was “Oh we get asked that a lot. You just go to your account profile and combine the abbreviation from Box 3 with the number from Box 5 so the account number looks something like ABC1245.” As I ran this frustrating scenario back through my mind (after I had managed to pay the bill) it raised several Customer Experience questions: If you have customers repeatedly asking the same question about a part of your process, then that part of your process is broken. You need to fix it. And not in a way that makes it easier for you, but in a way that it makes it easier for the customer to complete their task, like giving you money on time! If there’s a vital identifying piece of information that customers need to be able to interact with your business processes, then make sure it’s included on any, and all, customer correspondence or interaction, be it physical or digital. Names are important. Think about what you call something. Don’t expect the customer to know the terms you use internally. Pick names that the customer will recognize and use it consistently. As a further example of this last point, I once worked with a company where one of the product lines was known internally by its engineering name. No-one outside the company used the term to describe that sort of product. No-one in the industry, and certainly none of the company’s customers or prospects did. But the engineering name was embedded throughout the company’s processes and even used on the website. No-one ever searched for that name and as a result it never came up in search engine results and online lead generation for that product line was almost non-existence. After a lot of discussion we eventually got the product people to agree to using the more common name on the website – i.e. the term that customers and prospects used when searching. In a week the relevant webpages started popping up in the top 10 search results. In a year the lead generation increased exponentially with a resultant growth in product revenue. The customers were also happier, and support costs dropped, because they could now find the information they needed quickly and easily. All because the name was changed to the one that the customers used.

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The Best Way To Enable Your Digital World

Innovation Tour London

The Innovation Tour, London, Returns In March For Another Successful Year As data continues to reinvent our economy, just about every organisation in every sector must transform to a Digital Enterprise if they are to remain competitive and relevant. My favourite conversations involve hearing how our customers are succeeding in navigating this digital change. While digitisation is having disruptive effects on people, companies and markets globally, it’s also full of opportunities; particularly here in the UK. I am always impressed at the level of innovation and collaboration our customers achieve; particularly the new ways they are benefitting from greater agility, better insights and the transformative effects of responding at digital speeds. That’s why I am looking forward to one of the highlights of our calendar year at the annual 2017 Digital Innovation Tour, London on 21 March. More than 350 people will be attending this year’s flagship event and I will be aiming to speak to as many of them as I can and I would encourage you to attend and do the same. If you attended last year, you will know the value that bringing so much collective insight, experience and expertise together for one just day delivers for the rest of the year and beyond. Our customers tell us that it’s the quality of the networking and face-to-face conversations that spark new ideas, facilitate first-hand insights on pertinent trends and deliver fresh thinking around common information management issues, that sets it apart from other industry events. It’s a reputation we’re rightly proud of and are committed to continue. It’s also a great opportunity to hear from some of the industry’s leading experts who know how to drive benefits for your business, as well as learn about all of the exciting new innovation from OpenText as we continue to deliver against our product roadmap and vision. Along with an agenda packed full of real life case studies, we will also be hosting solution-specific breakout sessions and demonstrations. Customers tell us how beneficial they find these, as they can see first-hand how others have transformed their Enterprise Information Systems (EIM) to truly become Digital Enterprises and ask practical questions about how they’ve addressed specific scenarios. It’s our intention to make the 2017 Innovation Tour even more valuable and engaging than last year’s event. That’s why we’ve decided to hold this year’s conference at County Hall in Westminster to accommodate the growing demand. Whether you have attended in previous years or are new to the Innovation Tour, we are looking forward to helping you deliver the best digital experiences for your company, your wider ecosystem partners, and of course your own customers. Our objective is to ensure your business is empowered to explore the boundless opportunities that EIM delivers, which makes an ideal format for our conference. You can register for the 2017 OpenText Innovation Tour here. I look forward to meeting you there.

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OpenText Named Leader in Five Functional Areas of new Gartner ECM Critical Capabilities Report

enterprise content management

Last month, the highly respected analysts at Gartner released their 2016 Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Content Management. As I wrote in my last blog, the report provides some excellent insight into the changing Enterprise Content Management (ECM) landscape and how ECM solutions are evolving to meet the needs of digital enterprises. It’s compelling reading. And, yes, OpenText was once again named a leader in the sector—the 13th year in a row we’ve been honored with that designation. This month sees the release of the Magic Quadrant’s companion report, Gartner’s Critical Capabilities for Enterprise Content Management. As in the earlier Magic Quadrant, OpenText™ Content Suite scored extremely well in the Critical Capabilities report, ranking first in three categories and second in the other two. So, two Gartner reports, two leadership positions for OpenText Content Suite! What’s the difference between the two reports? In Gartner’s own words: “The Magic Quadrant assesses the ECM vendors with respect to their ability to execute in the market and their vision. This Critical Capabilities document assesses the 15 vendors in terms of their ECM suites’ functional capabilities to support the following five use cases: Personal and team productivity Records management and compliance Process applications Content ecosystem Digital transformation/modernization” It’s clear by looking at these five areas of assessment that the expectations and functionality of ECM have changed. Gone are the days when ECM platforms were viewed and assessed as labor-intensive, one-way repositories where part of an organization’s information was filed to meet compliance requirements. New use cases cover everything from digital modernization to employee productivity to process integration. What’s involved in each? Personal and Team Productivity A new generation of knowledge workers demands new ways to share, collaborate, and create. The new ECM standard is to make adoption and usability simple, allowing users to work they want to work, while providing relevant content in the context of projects and tasks and integrating with leading productivity suites like Office. Records Management and Compliance ECM is a traditional driver and a long-standing strength of OpenText. But governance can no longer hamper throughput. It must be an underlying, concurrent by-product of process and personal productivity. Automation and transparency are key. Process Applications ECM was never about ECM, it was actually about making the business better. Next-gen ECM must excel at the use of automation and workspaces to increase the reach, security, velocity, and value of process-generated content. Think case and contract management, M&A, RFPs, claims processing, and more. Content Ecosystem If ECM is about making business process better, it means that it needs to be extended into business processes and the business applications where the process lives. Previously isolated applications are now linked with ECM has the central hub, information can flow across functions, and governance can be extended. Digital Transformation/Modernization The first four use cases fit into our “new normal” understanding of ECM. However, the last one, ECM as a driver for digital transformation, definitely stands on its own. It’s certainly a source of pride that OpenText leads this category and it’s obviously critical to our customers as digital transformation tops the agenda for many organizations’ strategic plans right now. However, digital transformation starts with customer centricity. The question is: Does ECM have a role to play in customer engagement? Yes! It certainly does if you consider that enterprises now realize the digital employee has the same choices as the digital consumer when it comes to when, where, and how they get their information. Engaging and enabling knowledge workers is where customer centricity starts, and ECM is a vital part of that experience. Customer centricity also typically requires an improvement in digital operations. Based on the first four use cases above, ECM’s ability to improve personal and process productivity positions it as a key difference maker. Information is still the lifeblood of the organization and transformation initiatives almost always involve making the flow of information easier within the organization. What does it mean in terms of your success with ECM? OpenText believes the concept of ECM—whether referencing the product itself or the traditional definition of “content management” within the enterprise—MUST change in order for organizations to thrive as digital entities. Success in the coming decade requires a new approach to information management. Enterprises need to adopt a new stance in order to have full control over, and be able to extract maximum value from, their most important asset; the information that flows from every person and process in the organization. Next-gen ECM solutions will play a key role in that. Just not in the way many have traditionally viewed ECM. As Gartner’s new report highlights, technology advances now allow ECM platforms to play a lead role in driving light-touch collaboration, bridging isolated siloes, and instilling automated, transparent governance in every corner of the enterprise. Still not up to speed on the new way of thinking about ECM and how it can contribute to your success? The two aforementioned Gartner reports are required reading. And there is also some great insight here and here. Then, take a few minutes and explore how OpenText ECM solutions are meeting the needs of progressive organizations here, here, and here.

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Media Management – A “Rosetta Stone” for Rosetta Stone

media management

The Rosetta Stone the famous tablet, found in 1799, that displayed the same text in three ancient languages: Greek, Demotic (Egyptian script), and hieroglyphics, provided the key to enable deeper understanding and more accurate translation of those languages. In doing so it gave us a broader view of the ancient world and enabled other discoveries to be put into context. Sometimes the various different aspects of a large corporation can feel like they are using different languages to describe the same thing. What we need is a digital “rosetta stone” that can help facilitate conversation around shared assets from marketing, through sales, support, finance, legal, and other lines of business. One company that has successfully addressed that issue is the company named after the aforementioned archeological find – Rosetta Stone.  Rosetta Stone provides cloud-based learning for more than 30 languages in close to 150 countries. It serves schools, businesses, governments, and millions of individual learners across the globe. It’s an often repeated truism by those of us in the content industry that every company is a publisher, and this view is reinforced by Donna Bible, the Senior Digital Asset Manager for Rosetta Stone. Everything that Rosetta Stone does starts with content, and Bible and her team manage more than a million images, videos, and audio components used by professionals across the world to develop interactive lessons. “My role is to use the right system to collect all that content, catalog it, and enable the creative services teams who make videos for our end users, as well as the product and the images within it.” “We work with our creative and legal teams to harness the most recent videos and licensed imagery,” Bible states. “Using OpenText™ Media Management, I am able to gather the latest versions and final published documents and ensure that people see something that is out to press or published on the web and approved.” Media Management enlivens creativity and productivity, according to Bible. “If you are able to harness content, relocate it and reuse it, you are at a completely different scalable level of work,” she says. “You save your creative team time and you save the legal team time from having to contest rights.” OpenText Media Management meets the company’s expanding needs while maintaining a rich collection for its growth across borders. “Having a consistent vision of retaining knowledge and content … and integrating the different departments has brought and kept a lot of people together,” Bible states. “It’s also allowed us to on-board people more easily by giving them insight … Media Management has become more than just a work tool. It’s really an archive of history for the company.” For organizations implementing digital asset management, Bible offers this advice. “At first, involve as many people as you can,” she says. “Then, when you implement, focus on one group: get that right and use it as a service model.” Results compound quickly, Bible notes. “Trust that there is a snowball effect of value you’re building. After some years, it can be very satisfying.” Check out the video and download the white paper for more on the Rosetta Stone story. Or view this on-demand webinar to learn how another Media Management customer, Monster Energy, benefited from their  asset management initiative.

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ECM Success in the Real World, Part 3: Information Governance

Information Governance

If I were to pare it right down, there are only a handful of sure things when it comes to Information Governance (InfoGov): Every organization needs effective InfoGov. The odds of success are stacked against you without complete control of your information. It’s your most valuable asset. Every organization’s ideal InfoGov recipe is different. Depending on its sector, culture, infrastructure and other factors, each enterprise requires unique ingredients. We can all name some of the general governance concerns: Banks and privacy, Pharma and compliance, Tech and intellectual property, etc. But also factor in mature companies with established systems versus start-ups just developing their core policies. And don’t forget varying employee demographics. The combinations are endless. Every organization is struggling to achieve their InfoGov goals. It’s not just you. The influence of digital technologies on every aspect of the enterprise has redefined and reinvented the creation and flow of information like nothing before. And this is just the beginning of the disruptions to come. We hear about that last bullet a lot. Enterprises are seeing that the InfoGov models they’ve been using for years no longer work. Business applications have changed, the people using them have changed, the use cases for the information involved have changed. About the only thing that hasn’t changed for most organizations is the legacy ECM platform they’re employing to try and manage this new environment — a system most likely implemented years ago as a labor-intensive, one-way repository for information storage. It’s just not enough for today’s business needs. It’s Time to Rethink ECM’s Role in Your Information Governance Strategy Over the past year at events like Enterprise World, I’ve been having conversations with customers and industry leaders about how a new generation of ECM technologies offers an attainable solution to meeting today’s InfoGov needs. Advances in technology now mean ECM solutions have the ability to create a cross-enterprise information grid that integrates into processes and seamlessly aggregates and distributes information to the people that need it. It’s a massive step-change in information management, resulting in huge gains in productivity. And it also means InfoGov policies and practices can be extended to information generated in almost every corner of the enterprise—from social to ERP, BPM, HCM, SCM, CEM, CRM, and just about every other acronym you can think of. The key to fully understanding the potential of this new approach really means a wholesale reset of the concept of ECM—casting aside outdated perceptions to redefine the role of ECM in your organization and what success with ECM can mean. It’s a lot to digest, and hard for some practitioners to even visualize. As with most other things, I’ve seen that real-world success stories and examples help people relate. A great resource right now is the IGI Snapshots series, a compilation of five, unique stories that outline how different enterprises are approaching modern InfoGov, everything from planning through to learnings and insights. Most importantly, they show what’s possible if stakeholders adopt a new approach to ECM. Take a few minutes and let the case studies here inspire your InfoGov thought process. Then explore how OpenText Information Governance solutions can bring it to reality.

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Lower the Drawbridge and let the Data Flow

customer experience

It’s not often that Game of Thrones provides a moment of insight into data exchange, but that’s what happened this week. I am just catching up with season six of the top rated HBO series; and when the “Kingslayer” Jamie Lannister walked back across a drawbridge, having failed to persuade the leader of the forces under siege in the castle to surrender, it made me think about permeable data. In my last blog post I presented the idea that rather than trying to break down and remove the invisible walls that keep core customer data siloed and isolated in different parts and layers of the organization, we should let each group keep the keys to their (data) kingdoms, and benevolently grant access to the data to other groups and departments. In the world of Game of Thrones, with its ever shifting alliances and loyalties, the one thing that remains constant is the need for information. That information is often delivered via messenger ravens, and occasionally through personal contact as the various characters meet and interact. On the face of it, Jamie Lannister’s interaction on the drawbridge may have been seen as a failure. Yet, the more I thought about it, the lowering of the drawbridge allowed some significant “permeable data” to flow between the two systems in play. Each commander shared a little about their intentions and reacted to information that the other one shared. While Lannister may not have persuaded the besieged commander to surrender, he walked away with enough information to develop a way to later end the siege with relatively minimal casualties. And the commander of the castle knew more about his opponent, his strengths, and his thinking – even if he chose not to act on that information. Once that drawbridge came down, it was inevitable that data would be exchanged. We need to lower our system drawbridges. By making the data silo walls permeable, allowing the data to flow freely to and from the different repositories, a company can make the most out of its investment in the technology being used to garner that information, and keep the kingdom’s (data) monarchs happy at the same time. Data bridges allow the flow of information. Once enabled, the company can collect a piece of data once and share between systems, in a way that respects system ownership and allows each repository to use the data in the best possible way to fulfill its own line of business needs and tasks. OpenText™ Experience Suite builds on this concept. It lets data flow between the various products in the Customer Experience Management portfolio, so vital information and assets can be connected from Digital Asset Management tools through to the Web Content Management and Optimization tools and on to Customer Communications and even the Call Center, where data around sentiment analysis can be fed back to the Web Content design team. Each product can stand alone and address the needs of a particular line of business, or be an Enterprise content single source of truth. Yet by passing data between them, with other OpenText tools, or existing enterprise business systems etc., they can be the foundation of a fully connected continuous customer experience.

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What Does “Extended ECM” Really Mean?

Extended ECM

I may be in marketing, but I like to think that I am not prone to marketing-speak; however, I was recently giving a presentation when someone stopped me to say that “content in context” and “extended ECM” (Enterprise Content Management) sounded a lot like marketing buzzwords. While I see how someone new to the concepts might think that, they are actually pretty accurate descriptions and, I think, important ones. (Connie Moore at DCG does a good job explaining it in her recent blog post.) Let’s start with “content in context.” This simply means that your unstructured information — documents, images, email, spreadsheets, etc. — is significantly more valuable when it’s viewed within the framework of whatever business process or object it relates to. For example, a contract on my hard drive includes the names of the parties involved, which tells me something, but it can’t tell me if it is the most recent version. Were there later addendums? What if the copy I have only has my signature? Did the other party sign it and I just never received the countersigned PDF? Without that context, the document is of limited value. But if I can view that contract in, say, the context of a CRM application like Salesforce, the picture becomes clearer and that document becomes much more valuable. I can see notes on calls with the customer, who the key contacts are, and metadata like the status of the contract. There’s still a problem, though: If a version of the contract is also stored there, I still can’t tell if it’s the final version. And this leads us to the idea of “extended ECM.” By integrating ECM into the lead applications that across the enterprise, you can bring ALL the relevant information and documents associated with this customer and present it in one convenient view (to use another marketing phrase: a single source of the truth). I finally have the complete picture and can view it all in an interface I’m comfortable working with (like Salesforce). In the screenshot below you can see the ECM content from OpenText™ Content Suite within the context of the Salesforce data. This also works for other customer documents, invoices, correspondence, documents about products or parts, and any other unstructured data that is relevant to the structured data in Salesforce. And Salesforce is just one example of extended ECM (this DCG paper has more information). With OpenText™ Extended ECM Platform, organizations can extend Content Suite to virtually any lead application. I’m sure you can envision scenarios in your world related to BPM, ERP, CEM, HCM, SCM, and other information-generating business processes. Want to learn more? Read the DCG paper.

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Telco Accessibility 101: What’s Now Covered by U.S. Legislation

telco accessibility

In a word, everything. Name a telecommunications product or service and chances are it has a legal requirement to comply with federal accessibility laws. Let’s see… Mobile connectivity services for smartphones, tablets, and computers? Check Smartphones, tablets, and computers? Check Internet services (e.g., cable, satellite)? Check Television services (e.g., cable, satellite, broadcast)? Check Televisions, radios, DVD/Blu-ray players, DVRs, and on-demand video devices? Check Email, texting, and other text-based communication? Check VoIP communications and online video conferencing? Check Fixed-line phone services? Check Fixed-line telephones, modems, answering machines, and fax machines? Check Two tin cans attached by a string? Check All of these products and services are covered by U.S. accessibility legislation (except the cans and string). What laws are we talking about here? Mainly Section 255 of the Telecommunications Act of 1996, for products and services that existed before 1996, and the Twenty-­First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act (CVAA) of 2010, which picked up where Section 255 left off, defining accessibility regulations for broadband-enabled advanced communications services. Web accessibility legislation, while not telco-specific, is also relevant. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) doesn’t explicitly define commercial websites as “places of public accommodation” (because the ADA predates the Internet), but the courts have increasingly interpreted the law this way. Therefore, as “places of public accommodation,” company websites—and all associated content –must be accessible to people with disabilities. For more insight on this, try searching on “Netflix ADA Title III” or reading this article. (By the way, a web-focused update of the ADA is in the offing.) Last but not least, we come to Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, which spells out accessibility guidelines for businesses wanting to sell electronic and information technology (EIT) to the federal government. If your company doesn’t do that, then Section 508 doesn’t apply to you. What this means for businesses Not unreasonably, telecommunications companies must ensure that their products and services comply with accessibility regulations and are also usable by people with disabilities. This usability requirement means that telecom service providers must offer contracts, bills, and customer support communications in accessible formats. For product manufacturers, usability means providing customers with a full range of relevant learning resources in accessible formats: installation guides, user manuals, and product support communications. To comply with the legislation, telecommunications companies must find and implement cost-effective technology solutions that will allow them to deliver accessible customer-facing content. Organizations that fail to meet federal accessibility standards could leave themselves open to consumer complaints, lawsuits, and, possibly, stiff FCC fines. Meeting the document challenge with accessible PDF Telecommunications companies looking for ways to comply with federal regulations should consider a solution that can transform their existing document output of contracts, bills, manuals, and customer support communications into accessible PDF format. Why PDF? PDF is already the de facto electronic document standard for high-volume customer communications such as service contracts and monthly bills because it’s portable and provides an unchanging snapshot, a necessity for any kind of recordkeeping. But what about HTML? Why not use that? While HTML is ideal for delivering dynamic web and mobile content such as on-demand, customizable summaries of customer account data, it doesn’t produce discrete, time-locked documents. Plus, HTML doesn’t support archiving or portability, meaning HTML files are not “official” documents that can be stored and distributed as fixed entities. Document content is low-hanging fruit Document inaccessibility is not a problem that organizations need to live with because it can be solved immediately — and economically — with OpenText’s Automated Output Accessibility Solution, the only enterprise PDF accessibility solution on the market for high-volume, template-driven documents. This unique software solution enables telecommunications companies to quickly transform service contracts, monthly bills, product guides, and other electronic documents into WCAG 2.0 Level AA-compliant accessible PDFs. Whatever the data source, our performance numbers are measured in milliseconds so customers will receive their content right when they ask for it. OpenText has successfully deployed this solution at government agencies, as well as large commercial organizations, giving them the experience and expertise required to deliver accessible documents within a short time frame, with minimal disruption of day-to-day business. Fast, reliable, compliant, and affordable, our automated solution can help you serve customers and meet your compliance obligations. Learn more about the OpenText™Automated Output Accessibility solution.

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My Support – We’re Here to Help!

My Support

Please note the links in this article require a My Support login. If you don’t have My Support access, please register for OpenText Connect. Select “Customer Support Access” in the registration form. You will receive an email confirming your registration. We’ve all been there. It’s 8:00 p.m. on a Monday night. You’re trying to deploy your newest solution but something just isn’t working out right. You know Customer Support can help, but they won’t be online for another few hours. So what do you do? My Support is here to help! Before you log that ticket, explore the many resources available on My Support to help you resolve your problems quickly. Knowledge Base Have you visited Knowledge Base lately? There are thousands of articles addressing a wide variety of topics, solutions, and fixes. OpenText experts publish and update articles every day, making the Knowledge Base a great place to get started. Do a search and see what you can find. Ask The Community If Knowledge Base doesn’t answer your question, try our Discussion Forums. With over 2000 contributors, including many OpenText experts, there’s a good chance you’ll find an answer in one of the many discussion topics available on the forums. If you can’t find a related topic, post a question. There are always experts online to respond quickly to your issue. Live Chat Prefer to speak with someone one-on-one? During regular business hours, we also have operators standing by to chat with you. Our operators can answer quick questions, help locate resources on My Support, or guide you to the best channel for finding solutions to your problems. Use chat to communicate with OpenText experts to help you find what you need. Everything Else Don’t forget, there is still a lot more you can do on the My Support site. You can review your open and closed tickets, receive updates on existing tickets, find the newest update or patch for your deployed software, update your system information, manage your account, view contracts, follow progress on feature requests, request a license key, make payments online, and of course log a ticket! But before you log that ticket, take a tour of My Support. You may just find exactly what you’re looking for. Want to learn more? Be sure to check out our new infographic today. Have Feedback or Questions? We’d love to hear from you. On the My Support site simply click on Help > Send Feedback to let us know what you think. We also have a comprehensive Help & About guide that will highlight key actions and introductory tips to get you started.

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Webinar: Secrets to Increasing Contact Center Capacity and Efficiency

Contact center webinar

“There isn’t enough hours in the day to get my work done.” Sound familiar? Contact centers are continually asking their staff to do more without adding headcount. It can be an overwhelming task, but is one that’s critical to the success of every organization. Join me on an upcoming ICMI webinar that will explore staffing techniques, planning best practices, process optimization strategies, and technology shortcuts that will enable your existing staff to handle higher workloads – without the obvious risks of agent burnout, increased error rates and lowered quality expectations. Optimizing the Contact Center: Secrets to Increasing Your Team’s Capacity and Efficiency December 8th — 1:00 pm Eastern Time I have the pleasure of joining an esteemed group of speakers including:   Jeremy Hyde, Board of Directors, Midwest Contact Center Association Jeremy Hyde has over 10 years experience working in both inbound and outbound contact centers. In his current role he is responsible for vendor management and process oversight within the contact center for Ucare, a MN based health plan. Jeremy also serves on the Board of Directors for the Midwest Contact Center Association which aims to bring together a network of peers focused on collaboration and education. Jeremy is passionately focused on employee development, team culture and customer experience.   Justin Robbins, Group Community Director, HDI and ICMI Justin Robbins is a customer service expert focused on contact center operations and helping organizations appropriately define and achieve success. Over the past two decades, he’s coached thousands of individuals around the globe on customer experience best practices. Justin leads the content strategies and community engagement initiatives for HDI and ICMI and is a speaker, trainer, and writer on topics such as customer service best practices, key performance indicators, and motivational business leadership. He’s a professional member of the National Speakers Association and has been featured by the New York Times, NBC Nightly News with Lester Holt, Fox News and numerous other media outlets. To register for the webinar, please visit the ICMI registration page here.

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Innovation Tour: Sydney

Innovation Tour

On Monday, the OpenText Innovation Tour kicked off in Sydney, Australia with an on-stage presentation from CEO and CTO Mark Barrenechea. In addition to a look at new and upcoming product innovations, Mark provided an overview of recent OpenText acquisitions and OpenText’s position as the leading provider of Enterprise Information Management (EIM) technologies and services. OpenText EIM enables the flow of information from Engagement to Insight, allowing customers to extract value from information throughout the flow. Our newest project, Magellan, will use open standards, open algorithms and machine learning to enable customers to make sense of massive pools of data and harness the power of their information. Building on Mark’s presentation, OpenText CMO Adam Howatson (always one of my favorite presenters) provided an update on OpenText™ Suite 16 EP1 and an overview of our plans for EP2, due in mid-2017. Unstructured data continues to increase at a phenomenal pace and these Enhancement Packs are designed so OpenText can respond quickly to customer recommendations. For example, EP1 extends ECM to SalesForce and SuccessFactors, enabling our customers to successfully manage and gain insight from their CRM and Human Resources systems. We’re not the only people listening to customers. Special guest Michael Barnes of Forrester later took the stage to provide insight into what he calls the “Customer-obsessed operating model”. It is imperative that we look at the experience we create for customers from their point of view, and understand how every interaction affects that experience. In the age of the customer, it is important that we take what we learn from our customers’ journey and translate that insight into an improved experience. Using our EIM technology, we can coordinate and technically optimize the experience to better serve, delight and engage customers. What I enjoy most about the Innovation Tour is how it brings together OpenText customers, partners and staff from many geographies and allows us to discuss opportunities and solutions. In Sydney, we are speaking with customers from all across Australia, and New Zealand, a distance of almost 5,300 km. Tracy Parsons of the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) joined OpenText President Steve Murphy on stage to discuss the NZTA’s EIM implementation. Steve and Tracy discussed how the NZTA are using a cloud-based EIM implementation that includes both Content and Process Suites to digitalize business process, provide access to mobile workers and offer regulatory compliance. I’ve heard plenty of interesting success stories from customers during the event. The Sydney Innovation Tour is the first of eight stops, with Singapore on December 1st, followed by Tokyo on December 8th. I look forward to meeting as many of you as possible at the events. Please email me with any feedback or questions.

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User Adoption: Avoiding Public Sector Digital Transformation Pitfalls

Digital transformation

Amidst the media noise around digital transformation for the cloud-based, ‘Digital-First’ world, it’s easy to overlook a simple, yet critical component: will your colleagues actually use it? User adoption is one of the biggest concerns when it comes to investing in new technology in the public sector. It’s human nature not to like change, so unless it’s easier than whatever people were doing before, most won’t use it – no matter how many bells and whistles it has. Easy beats cool. Every time. Of course, that’s not to say simple to use systems can’t be sophisticated. But when it comes to dealing with millions of pieces of unstructured content, the fundamental principal of usability can often get lost in the size, complexity and context of the problem. One of the best examples in successfully tackling this issue is the approach the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust took, with OpenText’s help, to store, manage and digitise their patient medical care records. Rather than just looking at how to solve the problem of 900,000 unstructured clinical records, they took a more holistic approach around information management. They knew clinicians need to refer to previous medical histories, so before their system even went live, Royal Free back scanned huge volumes of data in the OpenText solution, making everything accessible, and easy to find in a user-friendly system that was designed to behave the way the staff would naturally work from day one. This not only gave their medical staff the content they needed, but also delivered it to them in the context of the patient’s medical history. Compare this to the old method of having to manually flip through paper records that were physically pushed around the hospital on 100 trolleys, and it’s easy to see why user adoption was so high. You can read more about how the Royal Free is driving value from its data, reducing costs, and simplifying its patient record access here. In all the work we’ve done with the public sector over the past twenty years, I’m always amazed when I see vendors lose sight of the user’s perspective. It’s one of the reasons we deliberately hire former practitioners directly from the public sector, as they’ve worked at the coal face on both sides of the fence. They understand the importance of making things easier than they were before, and the need of putting content into the context of how will be used. As MIT professor and serial entrepreneur, Alan Kay, once said, “Context is worth 80 IQ points”. It’s a subtle yet often overlooked aspect when it comes to digitising content and putting data in the cloud. And speaking of the cloud, we’re pleased to announce that we’ve now put our first offering on G-Cloud – OpenText™ Core – which makes sharing the right information with the right people easy and instinctive. You can find us on the Digital Marketplace here. If you’d like to know more about the latest developments in our public sector offerings in Health Care, you can read more.

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Removing the Data Barriers to get the Bigger Picture

Data barriers

Doing something over and over again and expecting a different result is EITHER practice, or insanity.  The difference is simply in how long you’re willing to wait until things start to change. Similarly, treating all customers the same and simply doing the same things over again in new channels, is equally unproductive. To successfully meet the experience expectations of today’s customer demands removing data barriers and agility in how companies leverage their customers’ data in order to deliver individualized experiences in preferred channels. This kind of agility requires connectivity and fluidity within an organization. Customer Experience takes a village It takes a collection of divisions and departments within an organization to deliver goods, services, and the desired brand experience, to customers. Similarly, customers interact with organizations via multiple touchpoints spread across multiple departments. So why would any company think a single source of data from any one department or division could provide the multi-faceted, let alone complete, picture of the customer it needs? To develop and implement a truly omnichannel and customer-centric customer experience strategy, companies need to gather insights from multiple data points to connect those experiences together. But even that is not enough. That data, all that data, also needs to be accessible by the myriad teams that contribute to delivering the customer experience for their own analysis and interpretation. Limited by data fiefdoms We’ve all heard the rhetoric of “breaking down the silos”. Many gasp and shudder at the thought of having to share the proverbial access code to the vault that contains THEIR data. Over the span of their careers employees develop areas of knowledge expertise, and maybe even fiefdoms, around particular systems and associated data. They develop a sense of ownership. The angst of now having to share their domain is brought on by many fears; What if they (the other departments) mess up my data? What if their findings contradict my own? What if …? What if …? What if …? This individual apprehension is compounded by the larger picture of company priorities and culture. Companies invest large amounts of money in existing systems, and with those systems adoption come established, good or bad, procedures and policies. Once these become intrinsic to the way a company does business they are difficult to adjust. Nobody likes change, and it isn’t realistic to expect these things to change, or as some cases may deem, disappear, overnight. But who says they have to? Permeable data silos Rather than trying to break down and remove the invisible walls that keep core customer data siloed and isolated in different parts and layers of the organization, let each group keep the keys to their (data) kingdoms, and benevolently grant access to the data to other groups and departments. By making the data silo walls permeable, allowing the data to flow freely to, and from, the different repositories, the company can make the most out of its investment in the technology being used to garner that information, and keep the kingdom’s (data) monarchs happy at the same time. By building these data bridges the flow of information from one system to the other is enabled, and subsequently encouraged. And instead of collecting the same data over and over again – a better experience for the customer already – companies can collect it once and share between systems, in a way that respects system ownership and allows each repository to use the data in the best possible way to fulfill its own line of business needs and tasks. Internal systems shouldn’t drive the Customer Experience; it should be the other way around Some might think that to solve this problem companies have to first look at the systems in place for collecting and storing the data. At some point, yes, there are likely redundant repositories that can be sunsetted once the data landscape is better understood. For a bigger, transformational impact, companies should turn to their teams and data-related activities. Understanding by whom, and how the data is used, agreeing to what it means across the organization, as well as in different teams and departments, is how the true value of data is extracted. By creating a customer-centric perspective internally around customer-related data, organizations enable the different parts of their business to consume and analyze data in a way that makes most sense for them, thus allowing them to have more insight into the customer, and therefore are better able to contribute to delivering a more customer-centric experience. Data driven companies that take a holistic view of their data, develop “data journeys” that transcend internal company borders and boundaries, and mirror their customers’ journeys, are winning the customer experience race. (This blog post was co-authored with Cathy McKnight of the Digital Clarity Group).

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Empathy Resonates in Chicago at the DX Summit

empathy

Empathy – If there was one word I heard more than any other at the recent DX Summit in Chicago, it was this one. Not something I expected at, what on the surface, appeared to be a technology conference. The Digital Experience Summit billed itself as the place to discover the strategies, technologies, and thought leadership that deliver game changing digital experiences. The Digital Experience showcase area included booths and displays from many leading companies with a range of Customer Experience solutions, including OpenText highlighting our Customer Experience Suite. Why in this technology-driven environment was such an emotional word ‘Empathy’ so prevalent? What do we mean by empathy? The dictionary defines it as the ability to understand and share the feelings of others. As many of the speakers at the conference pointed out, in order to provide an exceptional customer experience you need to understand your customer, their needs, and the context within which they operate. In short, it doesn’t matter what technology you employ to manage and deliver your customer experience if you don’t also have a degree of empathy – without it you will never fully engage the customer. Understanding the need for empathy is a definite step in developing a level of Customer Experience Maturity, and it was one aspect, among many, that was discussed in our own conference session on “The Redefined Customer Journey.” We had a great turnout for the session with a standing room only crowd as we presented many of the ideas and concepts covered in some of the previous blog posts around the idea of the Continuous Connected Customer Journey. As part of the session we also introduced the idea of a Customer Experience Maturity Model, that will be the subject of an upcoming white paper, and were delighted to see many of the session attendees participate in a short interactive questionnaire as part of the exercise. Thanks to everyone who attended the session, or visited the OpenText booth where we had some great conversations and were energized by the number of companies who are treating the delivery of an exceptional customer experience as a strategic goal.

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