artifical intelligence

Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Enterprise Content Management (ECM)

AI

“When the Washington Redskins win their last home game during an election year, the incumbent party will retain the White House. If they lose, the challenging party will take the election.” “Since 1972, if the SuperBowl winner is a National Football Conference member, the S&P 500 index denotes a bullish sentiment. However, if the winner is an AFC member, the market sentiment would be bearish.” – This statement was initially discovered by Leonard Koppett, and has been found to be 80% times correct as of Jan 2017. Both of the above statements hold true for different levels of confidences. The statements are based on the correlations and the rules derived using the various data sets. Neither of the statements are completely true, but can be used to develop a general behavioral pattern. The pattern needs to be vetted using much more volume of data and if found useful, can be useful for a predictive analysis. If predictive analysis can be automated, we are entering the domain of a much talked about technology – Artificial Intelligence. Artificial Intelligence (Popularly known as AI) is an intelligence as exhibited by machines, through the process of identifying patterns, learning from them, guiding decisions and then performing cognitive functions. What we have is the essence of both statements and the value of these statements is the data to back them up. This involved tremendous amount of data analysis and refining of the algorithms to be able to reach a simple and explainable data inference. Enterprise Content Management or ECM has been known to house terabytes of data – structured and unstructured. The amount of data stored in an ECM system is highly valuable for the organization if it can be mined properly. Structured data has been used for the report creation and search purposes, but the value of the unstructured content is still untapped. AI has already been an influencer in various forms that are touched upon by ECM. This blog looks at the impacts of the advancements in machine learning and artificial intelligence to the way enterprises have looked at their ECM systems. Impact of AI on Digital Interactions Artificial Intelligence has already found its way to everyone’s home today through Amazon’s Alexa, Google Allo messenger and others. We are all hearing about the pioneers of AI with self-driving cars, self-flying drones or even sensors to monitor hospital patients. AI is everywhere. Let’s consider some of the areas where AI makes a direct impact on our interaction with the digital world. Searching Google’s search engine optimization techniques are no secret to the world today. The use of machine learning algorithms, their self-improving and refinement of the search results have already shaped the way the users interact with the web today. There are multiple adaptations to this technique – music stores which help you select the right music and make predictions on what your choices should be. Generating Content Automated Insights – the creator of Wordsmith, the world’s only public natural language generation platform and #1 producer of content in the world, stated that its software created more than a billion stories last year – many with no human intervention. Gartner estimated that 20% of business content will be authored by machines by 2018. A writer cannot go through over 2 million blog posts created daily, but can leverage the technology to find out what keywords are used in successful content, or what topics resonate best with their audience. Designing Websites Platforms like Wix or The Grid have already adopted a supervised learning way of interacting to help people create their own websites. By leading customers through a set of questions and allowing them to make choices, these platforms also make recommendations on popular themes and what would go better with the choices already made. Promoting and Propagating Content Twitter bots can make this process faster and more streamlined, enabling marketers to publish and push content automatically across the platforms they want. Automated tweets can even be set to match user moods and emoticons. Predicting Choices A lot of online music streaming services make recommendations based on AI indicators. The North Face and 1-800-Flowers use AI tools as shopping assistants – helping customers and make spot-on recommendations. Moving Conversions AI tools have also been in use by sellers like ebay and Airbnb. These tools allow the sellers to understand the latest trends and help them price their product or service accordingly. At the same time, the same tool allows the customers to draw conclusions on the prices offered to them by the sellers. Continue reading about Enterprise Content Management and how AI could transform ECM on page 2.

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The Luddite Fallacy: How AI Will Change the Jobs We Do

Artificial intelligence (AI), robotics, and machine learning are automating jobs and bringing sweeping societal change. While this is not a sudden shift, the impact of this disruption is spreading to roles once considered “safe” from automation. We’re seeing automation move from the auto manufacturer’s floor to the legal office, the writer’s desk, the surgeon’s table and beyond. The Luddite Fallacy The thought of job automation is a worrying thought for many people. The idea of losing a job to a computer or robot is obviously unsettling. But, while the Luddites (which I wrote about here) saw an impact on their livelihoods long-term, automation generally created greater wealth and more jobs. This is commonly referred to as the ‘Luddite Fallacy’—the belief that the technological disruption of employment is unique to the present, and will fracture society as we know it. Yet, time and again we see that while a process may be turned over to machines, humans still play a large, and often more satisfying role. Automation-ready Industry Sectors It’s undeniable that automation and AI are making their way into our daily lives. Amazon Go is eliminating the need for cashiers, and self-driving vehicles won’t need truckers and cab drivers at their wheels. Artificial intelligence is beginning to diagnose disease, perform surgery, and even write film trailers. On the face of it, the sectors most affected by automation are manufacturing, wholesale and retail, and transport and storage. Examples of retail exodus are not hard to find; in the U.S., h.h.gregg, Rue21, and JC Penny all announced plans to close a total of 758 stores collectively. In the first half of 2016, the U.K saw more than 15 shop closures a day across the country, and the number of new openings has now fallen to the lowest level in five years, according to a report that highlights the pressure on the retail sector. In retail labor, Amazon has had a huge impact, with warehouse automation all but replacing traditional shipping and packing work that used to be carried out by people. On a typical Amazon order, employees will spend about a minute total taking an item off the shelf, then boxing and shipping it. The rest of the work is done by robots and automated systems. But nuanced human interactions are much harder processes to codify. While managing a machine via software is the norm, automating the deeper “thinking” tasks is much more complex, and until now something that could really only be managed by humans. But technology is now affecting those roles once considered “safe” from automation. The legal profession, once heavy with tradition and a lifetime of experience, is slated for transformation via AI and eDiscovery platforms that can review and create contracts, raise red flags to spot potential fraud and other misconduct, do legal research, and perform due diligence before corporate acquisitions—all tasks that are typically performed by flesh-and-blood attorneys. Automation Touches Every Role From the factory floor to the Boardroom, no position will be untouched by automation. Research suggests, “even the highest-paid occupations in the economy, such as financial managers, physicians and senior executives, including CEOs, have a significant amount of activity that can be automated.” The trend towards automation is one that reaches worldwide. In the U.K., up to 30% of existing jobs are susceptible to automation from robotics and AI by the early 2030s. In the U.S., that number is 38%, in Germany 35%, and in Japan 21%. Life in the Automated World Working life will change radically as we embark on the fourth industrial revolution. The world is ablaze with new ways to automate, and while it is hard to embrace change when it is perceived to threaten your livelihood, perception is not necessarily reality. I believe that job creation—and more specifically interesting job creation—is as much an outcome of automation as job elimination. The challenge is to leverage new automation to improve our way of life—not just eliminate jobs. Technology will radically change the sort of roles we all do—it always has—but we have the opportunity to embrace the areas of technology that can take our abilities from human to superhuman. Learn more about how you can digitize, automate, and optimize your enterprise information flows with OpenText.

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How Digital Transformation is Giving Humans More Time to Really Think

The pace of technological change today is being called the “fourth industrial revolution.” New solutions powered by artificial intelligence (AI), robotics, and machine learning are enabling machines to handle processes that once required human decision-making. Just as mechanical muscle lowered the demand for physical labor in the first industrial revolution, today cutting-edge technology is reducing the demand for human intervention. The “migration” of tasks from humans to software and machines has been evident for quite some time. From ATMs to automated check-in at airports, technology has been performing relatively simple and repetitive tasks. Today, this transformation allows much more complex and nuanced tasks to move from human speed to machine speed, across industries that have remained largely untouched by machine intervention. Most recently, AI and cognitive systems have found a place in legal discovery, insurance applications, underwriting and claims processing, and the delivery of financial investment advice. In healthcare, telemedicine allows diagnosis and monitoring without the need to physically see a clinician, and a surgeon can operate from another hospital or country—just more examples of where jobs long understood as “human” are being displaced by technology. The automation option New opportunities for automation will continue to appear, as mechanization, automation, AI, and robotics replace human workers. But it’s not all doom and gloom. As “traditional” roles are replaced, new jobs will be created in the transition—jobs that require creativity, innovation, and strategic thought. As we do away with mundane work, the time gained through automation can be used to innovate, germinate ideas, and conceive new processes fueled by the kind of thinking that only happens when our minds have time to wander. The beginning of a sweeping societal change? The World Economic Forum, economists, analysts, and labor organizations have predicted a wave of job losses due to the surge in AI, robotics, and other technologies. We could see a net loss of 7.1 million jobs over the next five years in the 15 leading countries that make up approximately 65 percent of the world’s total workforce. But two million of the jobs will be offset by the creation of new positions that will support and foster the new wave of innovation, beyond what we see as credible or possible today. But as some roles are automated, others will come online; for instance, individuals who can build, develop and make sense of these sweeping changes. Developers, programmers, scientists, and technologists will—more than ever—be required to drive forward the accelerating pace of change. There will also be a greater need for economists, lawyers, and policy makers who can interpret how governance, intellectual property, and society at large will have to adapt. While algorithms may automate decision-making, it won’t be easy to replace leaders who can navigate this new fast-paced, intense change. At the end of the day, you may wonder if a machine could do your job. And the answer is that it could probably do some of it. And that’s okay, because automation will free us up to do more of the thinking required to come up with what’s next, perhaps with the help of a new robot friend or two.

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