Information Management

Transaction Banking: Should you grow your own timber?

A compelling bank value proposition has to be unique – differentiated with a clear justification to enter or expand the business relationship, combined with benefits and demonstrated return. But, unique differentiators have to be supported by unique business processes, technology and people, all of which reflect the spirit, values and brand of a bank. This, my first blog, is a summary of the many discussions I have had with European and UK banks: and the big question is always “What should Transaction and Corporate Banking use as a high level check list for growing internal capabilities, versus leveraging partnerships or outsourcing?” Or, put simply another way, should I grow my own timber, or is there someone else who can do it better? Align your product with your commercial value proposition Since the world of Transaction Banking is increasingly commoditised, the banks’ value proposition is often built on several layers of technologies and processes developed decades ago. For the bank that wants to increase market share, unique differentiation has to be the way forward, while keeping commoditised technology and processes up to the latest standards cost-effectively. According to a Finextra Transaction Banking report 34% of those surveyed listed “increasing IT and system complexity” as the major challenge facing transaction banking, while “adding new products and services” remained the top strategic focus for banks in managing their transaction and cash management business over the next three years. So, are your technology, processes and people aligned with your aspirational value proposition, or are they still heavily focused on the continual design, implementation and day-to-day operation of the supporting IT infrastructure and system complexity? In other words, how much effort and investment are you putting into maintaining and running your various Cash Management, Trade Finance, Channels, Online banking and Payments platforms compared to innovation and industry expertise? Have you commoditised the relevant areas internally? My 5 tips on what you should do yourself vs where you should be partnering. Products vs Commercial value propositions. Internal products or platforms are the life and blood of a bank’s IT infrastructure; however their role is to support a commercial value proposition. Channels are not “sold” to provide connectivity or SEPA Mandate Management to manage mandates. They enable corporates to communicate with their favourite bank with high STP rates globally and seamlessly, without worrying about engaging with a new supplier, increasing complexity and risks associated with technology or new compliance rules. Let’s admit it; from a bank’s perspective, those internal products are a constant balancing act between client-specific requirements and generic economies of scale. As a rule of thumb, banks should first focus on decreasing the amount of major “bespoke” or “client-specific” business processes, IT components or technical functionality on their internal technology environment.  A successful health check could start with an inventory of these and separate elements between the ones supporting directly the banking value proposition (the client-facing products and assets directly supporting the value proposition) and the ones supporting the lifecycle of the internal infrastructure. Success stories demonstrate that both external value propositions and internal products commoditisation delivered through alliances can create positive business outcomes. Don’t underestimate partnerships. Since demand is often driving the products and services portfolio, beware of investing hastily in in-house processes, technology and people for a single or very limited number of clients, no matter how large. In the last decade, the banking industry has new options to dilute upfront investments and share revenue risk; including strategic alliances, multi-tenant cloud services, outsourcing. These alternatives can provide more aggressive timelines and partners may actually bring customers along.  Know how to bid for new business. In our competitive world, your client or prospect may be engaged with your competitors. Volumes and new functionality requirements are difficult elements to assess and commit to while bidding for a major contract. Are you benchmarking yourself often enough against what a partner could deliver on your behalf? Fruitful alliances often start as a one-off collaboration for a critical bid, sometimes they are tactical and bridge a gap so that the bank can catch up internally; sometimes they become strategic partnerships for unprecedented execution, customer retention and market penetration. Grow your own timber where appropriate. We hear the same story time and time again in both Transaction Banking and Bank 2.0 conferences: invest in internal, organic innovation for what you are best at: industry expertise, banking business processes, cash management, corporate banking. Maintain your awareness from other industries. No need to re-invent the wheel or react to your competitors’ new best practices. There is a good chance that a different industry has already maximised their return by adopting a new approach to their internal platforms, processes, how they exchange data with clients and how they manage to consolidate so much variety onto one simple technology stack. The world of EDI and B2B integration  is probably the best starting point for inspiring a more efficient Transaction Banking.  

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PHI Security Still a Challenge

Please Note: This blog article was originally written and published by a Fax and Document Distribution Group team member. Just a week ago, Emory Healthcare in Atlanta, GA became the latest victim ofa major data breach involving protected health information (PHI). The healthnetwork announced it was unable to locate 10 computer discs containing PHI formore than 300,000 patients treated between 1990 and 2007. According to a local news article from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution,Emory President and CEO John Fox admitted that the discs had not been properlystored. Although they were in an office with restricted access and nightlylockdown, the cabinet they were in was not locked. We can hope that the discs were simply misplaced rather than stolen ordestroyed, but incidents like this still occur far too often in the healthcareindustry. At risk is not only the privacy of the patients whose healthinformation could now be anywhere, but also Emory itself, because it is bound bystrict regulatory mandates like HIPAA and HITECH. Non-compliance can result incrippling fines and a loss of public confidence. Emory has already committed toproviding identity theft resources to all of the affected patients. This latest breach comes just six months after an internal breach in which anemployee perhaps unwittingly printed medical records that eventually found theirway to an identity theft ring. Nine of 32 affected patients reported that theiridentities had been stolen, and Emory alerted another 7,200 patients who hadbeen in their care at the time. All told, industry analysts calculate theaverage cost per breached document at $240. Though the employee was let go,Emory spokesperson Lance Skelly said the printed documents were within the scopeof the employee’s job duties. In other words, the paper was the problem. To seehow OpenText helps medical facilities of all sizes tackle this issue, watch last month’s webcast with TMCnet. While many healthcare providers are making great strides in effectivelymanaging today’s patient information, how many of them are effectivelyevaluating the risk associated with “misplacing” historic documents that falloutside the scope of their EMR deployment? For many organizations, it’s unlikelythat their next data breach will result from a virus or a group of teenagehackers. The real threat may simply come from the theft of unattended paper documents or an overzealous cleaner diligently “cleaning up.” OpenText has a solution designed for problems exactly like this. Alchemy, our document server solution, can capture documentimages from paper or just about any electronic file format, file them or routethem to specific users, and track every instance of access: where, when, and whosees them. Had the files on those discs or the leaked paper medical records beenscanned into Alchemy, the physical media could have been safely destroyed andEmory would be in the clear. Click here to check out Alchemy’s latest release, version 9.0.

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Small and Mid-sized Businesses, Why Bother with Paper and Fax Machines?

Please Note: This blog article was originally written and published by Jim Wieser. Countless businesses use Microsoft Office 365 for everything from email andcalendar services to document access and collaboration. They have already showntheir smarts and thriftiness by reducing onsite hardware and software andworking in the cloud. So why are some still relying on paper-based faxing andthe expensive hardware, supplies and maintenance it requires? Maybe they don’tknow about RightFax or Fax Appliance. OpenText helps thousands of small and mid-sized businesses (SMBs) around theworld manage and deliver their business-critical documents. We have dozens ofintegration options with the most common back-office and other applications hasmade it extremely attractive to people who don’t want to buy (or learn) newsoftware. One of the most popular recent integrations is with Office 365. By integrating Fax Appliance or RightFax with Office 365, customers enjoyimmediate upfront savings, increased security, and less time shuffling back andforth between workstations and shared standalone fax machines. In cases wheresensitive and/or legally binding documents are required to be sent to thirdparties, fax machines in public areas produce highly visible paper documents andpose a serious risk to information security – potentially resulting in hefty regulatory fines. Our solutions allow you to manage user roles and permissionsand fax from your desktop to erase this threat. We have seen significant benefits for customers who use OpenText’s richintegration with O365. These include: • More productive employees: No more time-consuming printing, manual faxing, and tracking. • Lower telecom, paper, and equipment costs: Consolidatephone resources for faxing and stop paying for fax paper, cartridges, andmachine maintenance, eliminate costs for filing, long-term archival and manualretrieval of paper faxes. • Less fax preparation: Any that can be printed can befaxed. • Improved efficiency: Send higher quality communicationmore quickly by faxing directly from Office 365 via Print-to-Fax or email. • PDF routing: Route incoming faxes to Office 365 as PDFattachments. • MFP integration: Fax through our fax solutions withoutpurchasing phone lines and costly fax kits for multiple MFPs. • Improved audit, compliance, and legal readiness: Audittrails are legally recognized making it easy to provide proof of compliance. • Document centralization: Keep all your communications inone place by using the Office 365 email client to send and receive faxes. • Support of green initiatives: Save trees (and money) bygetting rid of a lot of paper. That’s just what I can think of off the top of my head – basically, if you’rea SMB that uses Office 365 and also needs to fax, OpenText can help. If savingsand security alone aren’t enough to pique your interest learn more about thebenefits and integration listing from Fax Appliance and RightFax.

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High-Velocity BPM Comes to the Cloud

Submitted by: Derek Weeks on: April 24, 2012 Foryears, we have been known for our ability to rapidly deliver BPMsolutions to our clients. It is also known that as a result of ourintuitive user experience, many of our customers have quickly becomeself-sufficient in building a large portfolio of automated processesacross their businesses.Many customers have over hundreds processesautomated, supporting thousands of users. This ability to deliver highquality, high integrity process-enabled applications to our customers isa value that we’ve termed high-velocity BPM. And today, that value is getting stronger. /p> Aftermonths of development and planning, OpenText is bringing ourhigh-velocity business process management (BPM) offering to the Microsoft® Azure Cloud. Building on the success of our on-premise OpenText Shared Services Center solutionthat provides over 70 process-enabled services for IT and business, ourclients will now have the option to consider cloud, on-premise, orhybrid deployments. While the 70 process-enabled services alreadyaccelerate deployment and design initiatives, giving our clients theoption to deploy and deliver these services in the cloud furtheraccelerates their time-to-value. Following on the heels of our announcement earlier this year with Microsoft, we are really excited aboutdelivering this solution in the Azure cloud. I’ll describe a few ofthe benefits Azure brings to our solution below, but one of the best isthat when our customers choose to deploy in the cloud, on-premise, or inhybrid configurations, there is a single code base that makesintegrations, interactions and ongoing support easy. The Need for SpeedWhilevisiting many of our customers and prospects, I have heard themcomplain about the massive investments they are making to maintain ahuge portfolio of packaged applications for their businesses. Thebusiness executives are complaining that their IT organizations cannotupdate those packaged applications fast enough to keep pace with therapid pace of change happening in their markets and industries. In manycases, the same application is being modified with custom coding effortsto support localized business needs.And while IT organizations trytheir best to support the requirements from their business customers,they realize that every application change introduces more frailty andhigher maintenance of the packaged applications. In my conversationswith our clients, both IT and business execs are looking for analternative: they want to introduce changes quickly, yet maintain thereliability and integrity of the environment at a low-cost. Thisis where Shared Services Center is grabbing their attention. Businessleaders love the ability to deliver new or modify existingprocess-enabled services rapidly. For example, one of our clients toldme that they are rolling out 4 – 8 new services each week to supporttheir customers. At the same time, the IT executives there are in loveour solution as they get a common platform for delivering both businessand IT shared services that allows changes to be made quickly,affordably, and reliably. Cool, huh? While reading John Halamka’s CIO’s blog recently on dealing with the pace of change, he mentioned “If you aredoing business as usual, you are falling behind.” Change is everywhere.According to a recent Gartner survey1, nearly 30% of organizationsreported making changes to their processes on a monthly or more frequentbasis. An additional 37% of organizations made process changes on an adhoc basis. This is clearly a rate of change that most traditionalpackaged application environments can’t support. If your organization isamong those making frequent process changes, you might consider taking alook at OpenText’s Shared Services Center solution. More about AzureAsmentioned earlier, I am excited about the common code base between ouron-premise and cloud-based offerings. It just makes life simpler foreveryone. But that is not all Azure brings us. It also brings us theability to offer our software as a service to clients – bringing all ofthe benefits of our Shared Services Center solution without the overheadof deploying, configuring, or maintaining the underlying environment.What other cool things does Azure bring to the table? Here are just afew: Blob Storage,allows OpenText Shared Services Center to accommodate changing demandfor document and data storage, expanding and contracting to support yourorganization’s needs. Shared Services Center takes advantage of blob storage along with Microsoft SQL Azure to balance structured data performance with the need for unstructured data storage and retrieval. Justas our BPM environment allows you to redirect staff to better managechanging business demands and work assignments, Azure’sgeo distribution capability allows you to redirect computing resources to where they are most needed to better serve customers OpenTextShared Services Center is available in an on-premise version today, andwill be available via Windows Azure in July 2012.I’d love to hearyour feedback. Feel free to ask questions by posting a comment here orcontacting us at processspecialist@opentext.com.

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Patient Data Security: How Digital Fax Technology Can Help Healthcare Remain Secure and Compliant

Please Note: This blog article was originally written and published by Jacob Block. The security of Protected Health Information (PHI) is a primary concern forhealthcare institutions. PHI management is important not just for patient careand privacy, but also to meet strict regulatory compliance mandates. In thethird installment of a bi-annual survey of healthcare providers, a reportpublished in April details the current state of patient data security. Thereport was commissioned by Kroll Advisory Solutions, a leading risk consultingfirm, and published by HIMSS Analytics, a world leader in healthcare ITreporting. The reason for the report stems from concern over patient data security inlight of increased adoption of mobile technology for the exchange of electronic health records (EHR) and, more specifically PHI. Bymoving PHI to mobile devices, it becomes more vulnerable to breaches. In fact, 31 percent of survey respondents indicated that “information available on aportable device was among the factors most likely to contribute to the risk of abreach.” An earlier report by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) foundthat 207 data breaches in 2010 affected 500 people or more and were causedby: • Theft• Loss• Unauthorized access/disclosure• Human/technological error• Improper disposal Theft accounted for almost half of all breaches that year and affected anestimated 2,979,121 individuals. In the HIMSS survey, more than half of allbreaches were internal, but third-party sources were also recorded. Almost allrespondents require third parties to sign a business agreement before handlingEHR, but only about half indicated they ensure that their third-party vendorsconduct regular risk analysis to identify vulnerabilities. The HIMSS Analytics report found that on top of security issues, healthcareinstitutions are being torn in two directions. On the one hand, they are taskedwith protecting PHI, but on the other they are expected to comply with amultitude of strict regulatory mandates like HIPAA and HITECH. “Whileorganizations are actively taking steps to ensure that patient data is secure,they are so focused on meeting compliance requirements that they have littleawareness of the efficacy of their security programs.” Debate also remains over who exactly oversees which elements of EHR: “Asorganizations struggle to address data and privacy breaches, a lack of ownershipfor the issue across the industry remains. Various titles hold responsibilityfor pieces of the compliance puzzle, ensuring that their organizations meet themandates and regulations set forth, but the overall security picture continuesto elude most.” The keys then are: • Controlled document access• Confidence in third-party vendors• Clearly defined security and privacy roles The good news, according to the report, is that the priority of compliancehas raised awareness about the gaps in patient data security. Respondents rankedtheir preparedness at an average of 6.40 on a scale of one to seven in 2012,compared to 6.06 in 2010 and 5.88 in 2008. While mobile devices remain a concern, technology isn’t always to blame fordata breaches, and can in fact be the solution. Such is the case for thethousands of healthcare institutions using fax and document delivery solutionsto manage their EHR. Fax is still the preferred method of secure documentdelivery for healthcare institutions worldwide, and new fax technologies arechanging the way we interact with fax. No longer are workers sending and receiving paper documents at a fax machinein a public area. Instead, they can fax securely via encrypted email, orsecurely over IP from private, password-protected workstations. Othertechnologies include archiving tools that can capture, file, distribute andmanage millions of documents from a single repository, and can control exactlywhich users can see a particular record. This allows only the appropriatehealthcare professionals easy and immediate access to EHR not only to provide faster, better care for patients, but also to respond quickly to externalrequests for information. Tasked with both patient data security and regulatory compliance, digitalfax technology can solve problems for the smallest clinic to the largesthealthcare network. In light of the HIMSS report’s findings, implementing asecure document management system is good for patients and good forbusiness. See the full report here. To learn more about EHR management solutions for healthcare providers, visitOpenText’s Fax and Document Delivery Group healthcare page.

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Must-See Guide to #GartnerBPM!

Submitted by: Process Matters Blogger on: April 16, 2012 It’sthat time of year again – the Gartner BPM Summit – where all of thebusiness process management (BPM) gurus are set to gather together inBaltimore to discuss what is going on in the BPM world. The hottopics this year, not surprisingly, include case management, mobility,gamification and social media, and basic and next-generation BPM. Withan agenda packed full of keynotes, myriad BPM sessions designed for alllevels of BPM maturity (introductory to advanced) and user casestudies, it’s hard to decide where to start. We’ve taken a look at Gartner’s agenda and shortlisted the sessions we think are “must-sees.” Case Management Dynamic Case Management: Unifying Experiences to Transform Customer ServiceWendyKimball, Director, VSP, Kelly Romer, Group Manager, Intuit, and YaseminSezer, SVP, Software Engineering Services, L&T InfotechWednesday, April 25th 2:15-3:15PMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. Rapid Fire: Case Management: The Hottest Unstructured Process PatternJanelle Hill, VP Distinguished Analyst, GartnerThursday, April 26th 4:30-5:15PMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. BPM Success BPM FoundationsJanelle Hill, VP Distinguished Analyst, GartnerWednesday, April 25th 10:00-11:00AMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. BPM Best Practices of Highly Adaptive OrganizationsBetsy Burton, VP, Distinguished Analyst, GartnerWednesday, April 25th 10:00-11:00AMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. End User Case Study – Achieving Service Excellence: Making Every Moment MatterJorge Rosas, VP, Chubb Group of InsuranceThursday, April 26th 12:15-12:45View the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. Spectacular Success or Dismal Failure? Critical Practices for Getting BPM RightHelen Cousins, EVP & CIP, Lincolin Trust Company and Elise Olding, Research Director, GartnerThursday, April 26th 8:30-9:30AMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. Rapid Fire: Running A Proof of Concept to Ensure BPM SuccessTeresa Jones, Principal Research Analyst, GartnerThursday, April 26th 04:30 PM to 05:15 PMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. Metrics for SuccessFriday, April 27th 10:30-11:30AMJohn Dixon, Research Director, GartnerView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. Social media, mobility and gamification Keynote: Driving Organizational Success by Combining Social Media & Business Process TransformationAnthony J. Bradley, GVP, GartnerWednesday, April 25th 8:45-9:45AMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. Leveraging Mobility, Context and Communications Into Your Business ProcessesBern Elliot, VP Distinguished Analyst, GartnerWednesday, April 25th 3:30-4:30PMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. Gamification: Employ Game Techniques to Increase BPM EngagementElise Olding, Research Director, GartnerFriday, April 27th 10:30-11:30AMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. Expanding your BPM Strategy Time to Rethink Your Business Process Modeling StrategyDavid Norton, Research Director, GartnerWednesday, April 25th 11:15 to 12:15 PMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. End-User Case Study: Use Business Capabilities To Illustrate Crucial Investment DecisionsBetsyBurton, VP Distinguished Analyst, Gartner and Matthew Duncan, PMP,Senior Project Manager, Pacific Gas and Electric CompanyThursday, April 26th 9:45 AM to 10:45 AMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. BPM on the Horizon Intelligent Business OperationsJim Sinur, Research Vice President, GartnerWednesday, April 25th 11:15-12:15PMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. Technology Road Map for Expanding your BPM Efforts Teresa Jones, Principal Research Analyst, GartnerThursday, April 26th 8:30 AM to 09:30 AMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. Keynote: Business Process Management 2020Jim Sinur, Research Vice President, GartnerThursday, April 26 April 5:30 PM to 06:15 PMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. Driving Differentiation with BPM & Application Pace LayeringMichele Cantara, Research VP, Gartner and James Holincheck, Research VP, GartnerFriday, April 27th, 10:30 AM to 11:30 AMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here.

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EDI Invoices are e-Invoices. Right..? (part 2)

There are plenty of EU rules and regulations to help us understand what constitutes a compliant electronic tax invoice. EDI as a means to exchange electronic invoices is long-established and proven since 1994, but in some countries there has been confusion around how EDI provides tax compliance. In the past, companies would run an EDI program to gain business benefits but accounts payable/receivable would also process paper invoices, to ensure tax compliance. While there have been different VAT rules and regulations in different member states since 1990, it wasn’t until 2001 that clear VAT rules for e-Invoicing were issued by the EC, and mapped out how paper could be completely removed from the invoicing process, in a tax compliant manner. The 2001 legislation later harmonised in 2006, set out the rules for data validation, authenticity and integrity, and archiving.   One country in particular seized on these new regulations to provide explicitly clear rules on how both digital signatures and EDI can provide compliant e-Invoicing. In July of 2003 the French tax authorities new rules on e-Invoicing came into force. The French legislation combined each of the three core pillars of compliance into a single EDI process and since that time there has been little confusion around compliant EDI. This has resulted in a thriving compliant EDI industry in France whereas elsewhere, only the “authenticity and integrity” element for EDI has been used. Authenticity & Integrity According to the current EC VAT Directive the authenticity of the origin, the integrity of the content and the legibility of an invoice, whether on paper or in electronic form, shall be ensured from the point in time of issue until the end of the period for storage of the invoice. EDI achieves this transferring data within a secure network and messages sent and received are identical. This may be supported by interchange agreements, summary lists and sometimes by a trading partner list. A well-managed EDI process will store the different evidence components, including evidence that the chosen security and other controls are complied with, in such a way as to convince an auditor quickly that the archived invoices messages are authentic and unchanged since issuance. Companies issuing invoices must ensure the authenticity of the origin of the document, essentially this means that the issuing company is who they say they are and they issue documents within a secure channel. Trading parties must implement and maintain different security procedures and measures, including the verification of the origin, the non-repudiation of origin, the receipt, and the confidentiality of EDI invoice messages. Networked EDI EDI networks are private, secure networks where EDI related information can be exchanged between companies. Connectivity to the EDI network must be over a secure channel to guarantee the “integrity” of invoices, for example FTPS,           VPN,   AS2 or secure FTP within a secure shell protocol are all acceptable methods. Processes engrained within the EDI network ensure that the message transferred maintains integrity across the end to end process and any transfer errors are captured and dealt with. To ensure authenticity within an EDI network, trading partners will typically require a secure account and connection with an EDI network provider to both send and receive electronic documents. A well-managed EDI network process maintains a trading partner list that identifies all trading partners exchanging invoices. This list validates the trading relationship between trading counterparties. The provider will also keep a record of all trading party interchange agreements and maintain a summary list of all transactions between trading counterparties verifying each message and indicating any anomalies detected at transmission. During an enrolment campaign, suppliers will typically be part of a customer’s vendor master list, inferring an element of trust between the two trading partners. In an EDI network each supplier goes through an enrolment process and credit check to authenticate the company and if successful they have a secure account and connection within the network and “authenticity” is assured.            When networked EDI is combined with data and archiving compliance, it can both provide an end-to-end tax compliant process. The decision for your company is quite simple, is upgrading my existing EDI process the simplest, most cost-effective, and efficient e-Invoicing program to implement?         Point-to-Point Point-to-point connections can also ensure “integrity”, providing the protocol used is secure, again, the examples of      FTPS, VPN, AS2, or secure FTP within a secure shell protocol are all acceptable methods. But it is a little more difficult to quantify “authenticity” for point-to-point connections, by using a secure connection between your company and your trading partners authenticity is “inferred”, but perhaps not guaranteed unless you mandate secure procedures. If your company is using point-to-point to directly connect to your trading partners you must ask yourself what process both trading partners have in place to ensure the “authenticity” of invoices. I would recommend talking to your tax advisor on best practise.           AS2 is perhaps the most commonly used protocol for point-to-point connections and deserves a separate mention as AS2 can provide both “authenticity” and “integrity” at the same time because a digital signature is embedded into the protocol. Because a digital signature is embedded over the protocol, this doubly ensures the “integrity” of invoices, but “authenticity of the origin” of the invoices is also ensured by the electronic certificate, so if your company is running a point-to-point EDI program the recommended method of ensuring a compliant process is using AS2 with a digital signature. Web EDI Web EDI has generated some controversy over its ability to be compliant but as far as ensuring “integrity” is concerned as long as invoices are issued over HTTPS they will be compliant.  Web EDI provides “authenticity” as long as account security and enrolment process has the same controls as the EDI network enrolment process. Typically any web-form solution will require a secure log-on and therefore the trading party must have a secure account with the EDI network provider.  The enrolment of web suppliers is driven from a vendor master list from the buyer, during the enrolment process the supplier is asked a set of validation questions and successful suppliers are given a secure account. This web EDI enrolment process is typical of many of the alternative e-Invoicing service providers. Managed Services Another option is EDI outsourcing, which is simply a method of using external resources to manage your EDI environment on a day to day basis. A company can choose to outsource part of an EDI process such as on-boarding a group of trading partners, or they could decide to outsource the management of the entire EDI process. Most EDI implementations need access to resources that can develop maps, on-board trading partners and implement new communication protocols. Many companies do not have the internal resources to undertake this type of work and prefer to outsource it.  As long as the underlying EDI method used by the EDI outsource team assures authenticity and integrity, then outsourced EDI can ensure compliant invoices. Data Validation & Archiving So we can see that as far as authenticity and integrity is concerned, EDI can provide a tax compliant process. Some methods have compliance engrained into the process and other methods require certain procedures to be in place alongside. But so far, none of the methods discussed include data validation or archiving. GXS developed its e-Invoicing solutions to include each of the three elements of tax compliance – data validation, authenticity & integrity and archiving. Our solutions are inclusive of both digital signatures and EDI and the choice for our customers is simple, whether to upgrade their existing EDI process, or to leverage digital signatures where appropriate.                        So if you are considering an e-Invoicing program, why would you choose the EDI method?  Your company may already be processing EDI invoices. If so, your company will be able to extend existing contracts and SLAs and leverage a solution that will overlay your existing EDI processes. Many of your suppliers are pre-connected to EDI networks and this will reduce your initial investment plus allow you to get to ROI quickly. Any suppliers that are not can easily connect through web-forms. It should be re-iterated that EDI is not expensive any more. Suppliers can connect through cost-effective solutions, from web-forms for low-volumes through to integrated desktop solutions for mid-volumes. Many EDI network providers are pre-connected, and interoperability across networks is well established which opens up trading counterparty connections across multiple networks.           In conclusion, EDI does provide compliant e-Invoicing as long as you combine each of the different elements of tax compliance into a single process.

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A Simple and Compliant Solution to the Paper Problem in Healthcare

Please Note: This blog article was originally written and published by a Fax and Document Distribution Group team member. Managing excessive paper-based medical records is not for the faint of heart — especially when compliance violations can result in fines that well exceed seven figures. Healthcare organizations that employ a virtually “paperless” EMR or EHR solution may believe that they are immune to penalties but that’s simply not the case. Send a fax to the wrong person or leave a fax in whole or part at an unattended fax machine and you could be subject to costly fines. In fact, the number and amount of compliancy fines in the US is at an all-time high. Join OpenText on April 12th at 2:00PM Eastern / 11:00AM Pacific for an educational webinar, where you will hear from security and privacy expert Rebecca Herold, AKA the Privacy Professor,and learn about the risks associated with paper-based communicationsand processes. During the webcast, attendees will also hear from ChrisPatterson, the IT Administrator for Florida Heart and VascularAssociates, and see how they integrated an OpenText digital faxingsolution to achieve HIPAA compliance, improve processes, and dramatically lower costs. Who should attend? Healthcare Compliance Officers adopting new healthcare compliance initiatives Healthcare Professionals wanting to protect and secure patient information Healthcare Practice Managers seeking to improve productivity and patient care Healthcare Informatics roles searching for ways to improve workflow and streamline business processes Register today!

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Implementing an IG Program – Where to Begin?

Implementing an Information Program – Where to Begin? I am not sure if this has anything to do with the latest heat wave in Ottawa, Canada – yes, we are experiencing summer-like weather in March. Trust me, I am not complaining, but spring is in the air and it seems like it’s making everyone wake up to a very important topic: where to begin with information governance? I have received a flurry of inquiries over the past week, all with a common theme – where should our organization start?Something that is critical, and reiterated by many, is to ensure an information governance program lies with the Chief Information Officer and Chief Legal Officer, while involving records management and the key stakeholders from different business units. It is a team approach and not something that can be successful if only driven by one team.As opposed to writing an extensive blog post on all the key considerations, I have decided to talk about just one: start with the riskiest content. One important element is to look at your riskiest content first as it’s not always possible to conquer all requirements at once. There is nothing wrong with a phased approach; proving success in small increments can prove to be a good approach. One of the riskiest content pieces is email. Why?Simply because no one ever gets rid of it or if they do, it’s done on a whim with no consideration to its content. This type of activity can translate into an enormous exposure to risk due to the likelihood of smoking guns and spoliation. So, can email be managed?Absolutley.I strongly encourage flexibility, specifically when it comes to classifying email – one approach will not fit all.There will be some users that want the ability to drag and drop; others will want to choose their classification from picklists or favourites, while others will want the system to automatically classify emails.All methods are encouraged as you want to make sure you provide a system the end-user will use. As an example, take a look; well actually have a listen to how NuStar Energy addressed its email management challenges. NuStar Energy L.P. is a publicly traded, limited partnership based in San Antonio, with 8,417 miles of pipeline; 89 terminal and storage facilities that store and distribute crude oil, refined products and specialty liquids; and two asphalt refineries and a fuels refinery with a combined throughput capacity of 118,500 barrels per day. With operations in the United States, Canada, Mexico, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and Turkey, the company uses OpenText Email Management for Microsoft Exchange to help reduce the cost and risk of mismanaged corporate email. “Having all email in one location, being able to search in one place and put a legal hold in one location instead of potentially seven or eight, is huge for us on the legal end. It’s all managed by OpenText.”— Clint Wentworth, Records and Information Manager, NuStar Energy. There has been a lot of traction around the topic of auto classification. A very important element is to make sure the offering is defensible at the same time as being transparent. Defensible so that the organization can state to the courts and auditors the processes taking place to test, tweak and monitor the way the information is being classified.Transparent so there is no disruption to the way our businesses work. Yes, there is at lot to consider when starting to implement an information governance program.A solid strategy, involvement from key stakeholders and addressing your riskiest content first is a sound way to begin!

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Expanding the Envelope of BPM

Submitted by: Process Matters Blogger on: March 16, 2012 Organizationalleaders face difficult decisions when it comes to balancing changeagainst ROI expectations. Does change justify the cost in terms of time, money and resources? At the end of the day, executives are lookingsolutions that can help them create and sustain an agile business whileminimizing waste. Over the years organizations have achieved atremendous amount of success by using business process management (BPM)tools to do exactly this. Increasing operational efficiency, swiftlyresponding to new compliance mandates, dramatically improving workerproductivity, eliminating bottlenecks and cutting costs are the oftentouted benefits of BPM. However, despite thousands of BPM successstories, many questions remain about how to get the most out of your BPMinvestment. A few weeks ago Clay Richardson Senior Analyst at Forrester Research, Nathaniel Palmer Editor-in-Chief of BPM.comand Donna Tellam, Director, User Experience Specialist of OpenText BPShosted a roundtable-style webinar in which they discussed some of thelesser-known ways organizations can maximize the value of BPM. Here are afew key takeaways that can help you achieve the best possible return onyour BPM investment. Start small, think big, move fastThemajority of BPM projects are mission critical in nature and thereforehave a much higher internal risk. Clay suggests that organizations startwith a project that is big enough to demonstrate clear value to themanagement team, but still small enough that it doesn’t put yourorganization at too much risk. With the right amount agility in yourprocess improvement efforts, you can rapidly drive organizationalchanges. For example, one company had a big vision for BPM. In order toprove the potential value of enterprise-wide BPM deployment to theirorganization they selected a specific project where they could engagethe line of business manager. The scope of the project was small enoughthat only a fraction of the users were affected by the change. By havingthe line of business manger involved throughout the entire project,they were able to fully experience and convey how BPM could transformtheir organizational operations. Once users catch a glimpse of what BPMcan do, the team is almost bombarded with requests to automate keyprocesses across a variety of departments within the business. Breaking alarge, often complex vision into bite-sized projects pieces can be aneffective way to demonstrate the incremental value of BPM while settingthe stage for how BPM can be expanded to support broader initiatives andgoals. People driving changeA compellingevent is often the catalyst for a BPM project. However, some of the mostsuccessful BPM implementations start with a person, rather than anevent, driving change. These process improvement projects begin with achange agent that truly understands the strategic value of BPM. Thischange agent is either in a senior management position or has theattention of senior management and is positioned to gain executivesponsorship. It is important for the change agent to collaborate withthe person responsible for shaping the BPM project so that they canarticulate the need and value of process automation.Securing the rightexecutive sponsor and team for a BPM project is also critical to thesuccess and adoption of BPM within organizations.This support must besecured from the outset and can make or break BPM projects. The metricsTodemonstrate value, you must understand and measure your success – whichcan be tricky. Successful organizations measure how effective they areable to transition their organization into a more process-drivenculture. You can do this by taking a look at the number of processautomation projects you do in a given year and how many of thoseprojects take advantage of BPM capabilities. As your BPM teamshifts its focus from the typical cost-cutting objectives that involveautomating the manual, mundane tasks and towards value innovation, youwill begin to see how these improvements impact customer-facingactivities. By improving core processes that would typically takeseveral days, weeks (or even months) you are better prepared and havemore time and resources to devote to delivering innovation, improvingcustomer service and getting products to market faster. If you arenew to BPM or want to squeeze more value out of your BPMimplementation, I strongly suggest you check out Clay Richardson’sForrester Report, The ROI of BPM Suites. For those of you craving more information, download our recent webinar and podcast which unveils the steps to taking your BPM project to the next level.

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A Rising Tide Lifts All Ships

Submitted by: Derek Weeks on: March 5, 2012 How BPM Can Increase Your Overall SharePoint Maturity Over 43% of organizations deploying SharePoint are looking topurchase workflow or business process management (BPM) add-onapplications for the platform, according to the 2011 “How Are Businesses Using SharePoint” survey. Like many businesses deploying SharePoint, usage within theorganization expands dramatically as users find it a useful place tostore, share and collaborate on content and information. As the base ofusers expands rapidly across an organization, the amount of contentwithin SharePoint begins to balloon. As the comfort level withSharePoint increases users tend to store more critical documents likeinvoices, claims, employment applications, loan documents, andcontracts. Users then want to utilize SharePoint to distribute, review,amend and approve this critical content. The more critical the content,the more people across the organization want to interact with it to gettheir work done. Thispast week in San Francisco, I was invited to present a paper with SadieVan Buren on how organizations can improve their SharePoint businessprocess maturity. The business process maturity level definitions wereestablished by Sadie in a collaborative effort with many people acrossthe SharePoint community over the past couple of years. In addition toher business process maturity definitions, the SharePoint maturity modelalso provides level 100 through 500 definitions for publication,collaboration, business intelligence, search, integration and more. Youcan find a copy of her maturity model here. During our session, we discussed SharePointprocess maturity at five levels, beginning with basic workflows (e.g.,submit a time off request) leading all the way up to advance concepts,including dynamic process execution, process intelligence dashboards,on-the-fly process changes and real-time collaboration between processexperts. Improving SharePoint Business Process Maturity View more presentations from OpenText Global 360 At the lower levels of SharePoint process maturity, users takeadvantage of workflows to approve an expense report or a vacation timeoff request. In these instances, users have little to no visibility ofthe workflow’s execution status. Daily or monthly reports are notgenerated on process execution history, few people collaborated throughthe execution of the process, and the process itself rarely changed. The interesting thing about our discussion was that as processmaturity increased in SharePoint, other maturity levels increased.Process maturity was the tide that lifted all ships in the SharePointecosystem. At higher levels of maturity process examples are less tactical andmore strategic to the business. For example, take a business that isusing SharePoint as an application platform to host operations like loanprocessing, accounts payable or new account on-boarding. For theseorganizations, visibility to process execution is critical for knowledgeworkers, management and business analysts. Process changes areinitiated by both SharePoint developers who are making changes to theprocess application or by managers who are changing work assignmentsbased on business intelligence metrics displayed within their view tothe application. Additionally, as process maturity levels increase, roles (e.g., caseworkers, reviewers, researches, approvers and supervisors) interactingwith the process are more specialized. We also see collaboration toolswithin those applications being used across those roles to speeddecision making. Sadie and I discussed that as SharePoint process maturity increases, so do the maturity levels for collaboration, business intelligence, search and integration. So, you might ask yourself – why is this important to the SharePointand business process community? For years now the SharePoint communityat large has been concerned with its accelerated use and expandedpresence in the enterprise. As SharePoint’s popularity has grown, thecost to support it has also grown – not only in terms of license cost,but in IT personnel required to support and maintain it, trainingrequired, hardware to run it, etc. As the cost of the environmentcontinues to expand, CIOs and other business leaders are asking how theycan get a better return on those investments. As the cost increases,people are looking beyond the technology strategy and are beginning toquestion the business strategy behind SharePoint. The same 2011 surveymentioned above showed that beyond user adoption and training, the lackof or limited business strategy surrounding SharePoint was their secondbiggest challenge with the platform. If your organization is seeking more value from SharePoint andlooking to resolve your business strategy for the platform, I stronglysuggest that you consider the adoption of workflow and businessesprocess as a key part of their overall program. Interested in learning more about SharePoint and process maturity,please visit our SlideShare site to get a copy of the presentation, “Improving Your SharePoint Process Maturity” that Sadie and I delivered.

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Does This Make My Process Look Fat?

How the people side of change impacts business transformation resultsPeopleare the hardest part of business change. If you want to increase thechance of success of change efforts, you need to emphasize not just thequality of the technical solution, but also the role that stakeholdersplay in the process change itself. Despite automation gains, industry processes are still heavily people and paper-oriented. So itstands to reason that changing the way business is done for the bettermeans finding new ways of handling information, revamping manualprocesses and motivating workers. To include the people side in ourprocess, change initiatives will require “fit to purpose” tools thataddress the user perspective. Process improvement needs leaner “fit to purpose” toolsWithcontinuing pressure from the global economy, organizations face anincreasing demand for lean tools to get more done with fewer resources. AsClay Richardson of Forrester Research¹ writes in his blog, “The shiftaway from ‘IT-centric’ inflexible solutions such as CRM and ERP willgive way to more dynamic business-centric solutions that deliver thesame process improvements with greater flexibility and adaptability forthe business.” Business process (BPM) and case management meet this demand as “fit to purpose” technology. Toillustrate, consider a customer enrollment process. Here there is aneed to involve and balance people, paper and automation. Human judgmentis also often required for exception handling or contextual decisionmaking. A purely rules-based automation technology to define anenrollment process makes it difficult to do anything more than track thestatus of a particular application using an attribute. This limitsvisibility into the actual process. The electronic forms capabilities ofmost traditional content management solutions doesn’t quite fit eitherbecause enrollment isn’t about the document itself but rather about thecustomer and all their supporting information housed in many othersystems. Indeed, most traditional packaged application solutionsoften ignore paper and focus on the process steps, glossing over thechallenge that the content itself presents. However, business processand case management fit the less structured, collaborative needs of theenrollment process and many other core processes quite well. Managingand controlling processes is what we are ultimately trying to achieve.To do this successfully will require our understanding and inclusion ofthe human factor. Processes don’t do work, people doAs Keith Harrison-Broninski aptly reminds us in his landmark book²Human Interactions: The Heart and Soul of Business Process Management, “After all processes don’t do work, people do.” Intoday’s knowledge-based economy, the fact is that most work processes,including the hardest ones to control, are carried out by people ratherthan computer systems. That is why leading organizations are includinguser work study and a focus on user interface designin their business improvement strategies.We can use this informationto improve and amplify human-driven processes and to better serve thecritical needs of our knowledge workers. For maximum results,solutions should have an obvious and direct impact on each individualstakeholder. McKinsey advises leaders at companies starting atransformation to put a priority on finding efficient and scalable waysto engage employees.³ In a digital era characterized by increasedcollaboration, organizations are shifting from a purely IT-centricstrategy to create dynamic, business-driven process solutions. Acritical element in that shift is the renewed emphasis on designinguser-centric environments and controls. User-centricity requires theavailability of context-driven content and the ability to supportknowledge worker decisions via the integration of all the pertinentdata, tasks, milestones, discussions, events, policies and processes.Part of the growing trend is the move to support more complex processeswith ad-hoc and less-scripted workflows by leveraging case management disciplines and technologies. Case in point is Univita Health. Business process and case management are critical to supporting theirlong-term care group, one of the premier suppliers of outsourcedservices in the industry. Univita traditionally had maintained long-termcare coverage as its base but had switched to a differentmodel—home-based healthcare – and needed to be more efficient inmanaging their knowledge work. With their solution in place,Univita automatically routes documents to a knowledge user who isresponsible for the related line of business. The document is evaluatedand classified based on the request type. The user can add the documentto an existing client file or create a new work case depending on therequest. The solution is integrated with the client information systemthat is used to validate the customer information. Once this vettingprocess is complete, the request is routed to a work queue based on therequest type where a knowledge user can select the work request. Asa result, Univita is able to prioritize work and match work requestswith user skills. Once the process is complete, the documents areautomatically archived but remain available in the event there is acustomer inquiry. Univita now has a workbench for their knowledgeworkers and a single point of reference for customer correspondence. The truth about people and changeWhetheryou follow Lean, Six Sigma, or a combination of disciplines, one truthwe all recognize is that people are the hardest part of business change. I have learned from experience how important it is to consider theusers’ point of view. This is especially true for less prescriptiveprocesses, where work is centered on and driven by the processparticipants. Perception is reality – if the process change is perceivedas unfavorable then it will be so. To be successful then we need todesign the user experience to serve each participant role, includingfocus on the all important customer role. And, if you want toincrease the chance of success and accelerate the implementation ofchange efforts, you need to emphasize not just the quality of thetechnical solution, but also the role that stakeholders play in theprocess change itself. One of my favorite examples is the business transformation at Irish Life, They are one of Ireland’s largest and most successful financialorganizations and the market leader in the provision of life, pensionand investment products. Irish Life was drowning in paper and, without astandard process, turnaround times were excessive. There was novisibility of where work was in process and the #1 customer complaintwas response time. Irish Life chose business process and casemanagement to remove paper and streamline their processes and balanceworkload, resulting in improved customer turnaround time andconsistency, management visibility into all work statuses, and a 35%improvement in productivity. To achieve their goal, Irish Lifeincluded the process participants and stakeholders in the improvementinitiative. By focusing on the user, Irish Life changed how their workgets done. In effect, they improved the workers experience, rather thanmerely speeding old and potentially ineffective ways of working. Froma people perspective the system has made a huge impact.While theenvironment is more controlled than before, employees recognize theimprovements in the way they work and the results of that work are beingdriven by the BPM solution. A key example is how they deal with‘problem cases’. The teams now have the correct information and thenecessary time to process the cases within the SLAs, which is clearly asource of satisfaction for the workers. In fact, with the improvedvisibility at an executive, management, and team level, it is notunusual to find employees now being proactive; asking questions like‘can we also do this with the system?’ With improvements implementedthroughout the business, Irish Life’s motto is now ‘today’s work donetoday.’ The Irish Life success is all about driving adoption rates andenthusiasm from the grass roots as well as top down. Evidence the CEO’scomment, “It’s been the best thing IT has ever done for the business.” Thelesson learned is that in order to drive operational efficiency andproductivity improvements, we need to focus our efforts to consider howpeople will embrace, accept and adopt change resulting from thoseefforts. Being user-centric and attuned to your stakeholder motivationsand solution needs will enable faster time to business value with changethat is also sustainable. If you are looking for more information about how to succeed with BPM and case management, I recommendthe “7 Steps to Process Mastery” eBook series as a good read for those just starting on the journey and a useful reference for those who are well on their way. References:¹ Forrester Blog Posted by Clay Richardson on March 21, 2010² Published by Meghan-Kiffer Press ISBN 0-929652-44-4³ What successful transformations share, a McKinsey Global survey, January 2010

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Make Your Faxes Mobile

The use of mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets is becoming increasingly popular in everyday business. Mobile devices are used in virtually every industry and have become an integral element of core business processes. Let’s look at the three major ways in which mobilitytrends impact organizations: 1. Mobile devices use a wide range of differing operating systems 2. Employees are bringing their owndevices into the workplace, driving the need for enterprise-grade Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD) strategies 3. Consumer applications are mobile, and employees expect business apps to follow Gartner predicts that by 2014, 90 percent of organizations will support corporate applications on personal mobile devices . In line withthese trends, the need for mobile access to RightFax has become apriority. To this end, OpenText teamed up with Cortado, a leading provider of virtual desktop technology. Cortado Corporate Server Integrating mobile devices into corporate IT structures poses a challenge to administrators because of the wide variety of devices and their varying operating systems and security features. Cortado CorporateServer provides users with the solution to accommodating differentmobile platforms: it gives employees with smartphones and tablet PCssecure access to corporate network resources and allows them to usetraditional desktop functions while on the go, just as if they were attheir workstation in the office. Users can access files and informationon the corporate network at any time with their mobile devices, andeither print directly to the nearest printer or send documents via fax.On the backend, the Cortado Corporate Server acts as a mobile devicemanagement system and allows secure management of users, profiles, andpolicies. Cortado Connector for RightFax The Cortado Connector for RightFax simply integrates RightFax with theCortado Corporate Server. This module is the interface between CortadoCorporate Server and RightFax. Utilizing the Cortado software, themodule will pick up the Cortado application output files and send themout through the RightFax server. Most common file formats in Windowsenvironments are supported. Fax status reports must be configured withinRightFax and can be sent to the fax sender’s mailbox. Description of the RightFax – Cortado Integration Cortado Corporate Server’s integration with RightFax allows users with amobile device or tablet to send documents via fax either from withinthe office environment or remotely. Cortado enables those documents tobe retrieved from a file-share on the organization’s local network orfrom the local device itself. This overcomes security and complianceissues customers face when they are, for example, out of the office andtrying to send a document via fax, but are unable to use theorganization’s central RightFax server. The Result Cortado Corporate Server and RightFax work together to offer customers numerous benefits: • Fax documents from a mobile device with ease • Send any document as a fax – whetherfrom the corporate network, local directories on the device, or as anattachment from an email program • Trigger and fax up-to-date database reports • Reduce data traffic by eliminating download of centrally-stored files • Create fax documents on the fly on your smartphone or tablet PC • Receive fax status notifications on the device For organizations, the result of the RightFax and Cortado Corporate Server integration is a solution that brings a reduction in cost and ITadministration, while simultaneously increasing productivity, security,and compliance. RightFax & Cortado: The right fax solution for every BYOD strategy! Martin van Ginkel Strategic Alliances Manager EMEA OpenText Corporation

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Exposing the value of BPM

Submitted by: Process Matters Blogger on: February 20, 2012 Inefficientprocesses can make or break your organizations ability to succeed. Eachyear organizations dish out hundreds, even millions, of dollarsleveraging the wrong resources to try and improve ineffective businessprocesses. Companies that are unable to adapt to new industryregulations, changing business models and competitor innovation arefacing the reality of failure. The bar is set high and now more thanever, consumers expect (and often demand) more from organizations. Asbusiness leaders look past slow-to-change packaged applications andtowards new ways to improve mission-critical processes, manyorganizations have started to embrace business process management (BPM)technologies. While the adoption of BPM suites increases each year, manyorganizations have yet to realize the rich benefits they can achieve byextending their BPM implementation beyond its traditional cost-cuttingfocus. Not surprising, Clay Richardson, senior analyst at Forrester refers to some of the major benefits of process automation as low-hanging fruit – whichincludes for example, the elimination of bottlenecks – such as dataentry duplication – to increase operational efficiency. Other benefitsinclude the ability to quickly and effectively respond to compliance andprocess change, improve worker productivity, and increase collaborationbetween business and IT.¹ However, as an organization’s understanding,awareness and use of BPM matures, many key stakeholders begin to realizethey can leverage these tools to continuously improve and transformtheir business. BPM has the potential to deliver significant ROIand transform your organization. According to Forrester Research, manyorganizations who have achieved significant success have shifted theirBPM priorities from reducing costs to improving customer experience andincreasing value innovation. These companies see a tremendous return oninvestment in the form of increased competitiveness, customer growth,accelerated time to market, and improved operating model flexibility. Organizationshave the ability to continuously improve and change the way theyoperate by using BPM. With the right information, resources and team,businesses can achieve a strategic advantage over the competition. Ifyou’re interested in learning more about identifying and measuring theROI your organization can achieve from BPM, I encourage you to join ClayRichardson, Nathaniel Palmer, and Donna Tellam on Tuesday, February21st at 11:00 AM EST for a free webinar on Unlocking the Secrets of BPM ROI. You may also click here to access a free copy of Forrester’s ROI of BPM Suites report. ¹Forrester Research, “The ROI of BPM Suites” by Clay Richardson, August 22, 2011.

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SWIFT Faces Tough Predicament as EU and US Pressure to Suspend Iranian Banks Rises

B2B Integration Networks are making the front pages of the newspaper again today as SWIFT faces growing pressure to block Iranian banks from using its network.  An article from the Associate Press this morning provides a full background on the story stating “The United States and Europe are considering unprecedented punishment against Iran that could immediately cripple the country’s financial lifeline.”  SWIFT was also mentioned in the front page headline story of today’s Wall Street Journal.

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Gamification is Central to Social

Submitted by: Derek Weeks on: February 14, 2012 Years ago when I was in school, I asked my business professor toshare a bit of advice that he had found invaluable throughout the years. He offered me a simple quote, “Keeping score, improves the score.” I cannot count the number of times I’ve been reminded of that bit ofadvice. The idea of knowing what you are doing, how well you are doing,and how well others are doing the same thing, touches on both ourbusiness and our personal lives. Anyone making an effort to be morecompetitive, more productive, or more efficient can benefit from “thescore. Aswe all saw in the recent Super Bowl, the score was motivating actionsof all-star players until the very last seconds of their performance.But the players were not the only ones motivated.The score alsomotivated the coaches to architect new plays and game-winningstrategies. The fans were motivated to cheer on their favorite players,encouraging them to improve the score. For everyone at the game, knowingthe score helped them improve the fight, strategize, or cheer toimprove the score. There is no doubt that Football is a ”social” gamewhere the interactions of many can change the outcome. Now, let’s turn to business. One of our account executives in theUK frequently tells a storyabout one of ourlarge insurance clients. The client installed wide screen displays in all of their offices — notto watch the latest football matches – but to keep score within theirbusiness so that every day they would know: How many transactions that day required processing How many transactions were in progress How many transactions hadbeen completed How many transitions were at risk of being late These monitors were showing everyone “the score” of the day’sactivities.The data reflecting the current state of the business wasnot shared by a select few, but by the masses. Having that informationavailable helped motivate people to work not only faster, but smarter.If a deadline was at risk, the team huddled to figure out the best wayto mitigate the delay. If the team was exceeding performanceexpectations, people could feel the buzz of excitement in the office. Thisis just one way business process performance metrics of our solutionsare being used in a social sense to motivate actions and interactions.It is a simple example of how gamification is being introduced in thework place. This leads me to think about some of the great new social businessprocess management (BPM) technologies OpenText is rolling out. Recentattendees at the OpenText BPM Summit last fall and those planning toattend our spring events (e.g., regional BPS Live! meetings andGartner’s BPM Summit) saw or will see our new social server technology.This technology allows people to interact with one another in new,non-programmatic ways around a process and its outcome. The premise ofthe technology is simple in that “none of us is as smart as all of us.” Usingthe technology in the context of business process management will allowour clients to interact with their colleagues as well as partners,customers, or constituents to speed and improve the outcome of aneffort. Coupling the social server technology with the performancemetrics above moves us another step closer to bringing gamificationconcepts into our business process solutions. By knowing the score,participants will seek to improve the score. By seeking to improve thescore, participants will encourage the talent, experience and know-howof others to influence outcomes for their business. If you would like to read more about gamification entering the worldof business applications, I encourage you to read the recent article inForbes by Haydn Shaughnessy, called “The Day I Knew Gamification Would be a Winner.” I would also encourage you to share your thoughts in the comments areabelow about how gamification of business process solutions could changeyour business’ score.

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Must-See Live Webinars for February

Submitted by: Process Matters Blogger on: February 7, 2012 Februarymight be the shortest month of the year, but that’s not holding usback. Our calendar this month is jam-packed with informative webinars ona variety of topics around business process management (BPM) andenterprise architecture (EA). Check out the list below to see what wehave to offer and be sure to register! Communicating in the Language of BusinessThursday, February 9, 201211:00AM-12:00PM EST It’sno secret that companies are looking to their enterprise architectureteams to increase business agility, cut costs, streamline operations andimprove customer service. In this webinar, Sandra Moran, Director,Product Marketing for OpenText BPS will illustrate how enterprisearchitects can leverage customizable business performance intelligencedashboards to better demonstrate to both business and IT leaders thedeeper value you can achieve from your EA investments. For more detailsand to register, click here. Financial Services Webinar Series: Paperless FundingWednesday, February 15, 201211:00AM-12:00PM EST Inthis 30 minute demo Brett Kovach, Senior Solution Consultant forOpenText BPS will show you how banks and major automotive and equipmentfinancing organizations improved their lease and loan origination withthree simple best practices for BPM. For more details and to register,click here. Unlock the Secrets of BPM ROI: Insightful Study from Forrester ResearchTuesday, February 21, 201211:00AM-12:00PM EST In the third installment of our Getting Started with BPM series, Clay Richardson, Senior Analyst, Forrester Research, Nathaniel Palmer,Editor-in-Chief of BPM.com, and Donna Tellam, BPM Solutions Director,User Experience Specialist, OpenText BPS will share proven strategiesfor BPM success. Learn from real-world examples of the challengesorganizations face with BPM and how they’ve managed to overcome them. Weencourage you to watch the first two installments, Practical Approach to Get Started with Process Improvement and Building the Right Team to Drive Process Improvement. For more details and to register, click here. New Matter Intake Meets the iPhoneWednesday, February 22, 201211:00AM-12:00PM EST Goneare the days of being chained to your desk! Today, law firms canleverage mobile BPM capabilities — on the go — to expedite criticalprocesses – such as new matter intake.Mobile BPM keeps processesmoving, regardless of the lawyer’s location. Join Keith Levin, LegalSales Manager for OpenText BPS and Kristian Uggla, Legal SolutionsEngineer for OpenText BPS, as they explain how OpenText’s new mobile BPMcapabilities can increase your agility and reduce your time to value.For more details and to register, click here. Ifyou can’t make it to one of these webinars, don’t worry! We’ll have therecording onDemand so that you can watch it whenever you have the time. You can access the recordings, here.

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Governance: It Doesn’t Matter What, It Really Matters Who

As I just got back fromLegalTech NY, where I spent many hours speaking with General Counsels and IT Directors about their business requirements, I wanted to share and repost a blog, which is relevant to those discussions. The following is a guest post by Dave Martin Originally posted on Dave Martin’sblog on SharePointProMagazine. Read the other posts in this series here. Over the years one of the many things I’ve been involved with is governance.To most the word governance is synonymous with compliance, which is then in turn synonymous with records management.After that the focus becomes very specific.What I recommend people do when trying to understand how they should approach governance is to approach it as a strategy and make sure that strategy involves and intertwines three things: people, process and technology. If this sounds familiar it was an integral part the first post I wrote in this series around understanding SharePoint from a big picture perspective.When it comes to governance specifically there is a certain part of this triumvirate that stands out: the people.We often run headstrong into governance deployments without really understanding who needs to be involved before the code hits the servers and processes are under way. The very first step organizations need to take is defining that small group, who will steer the solution to and through implementation.Obviously IT pops up first as we look to define this working group, and they are unquestionably a very big part as they will be responsible for the technology doing what it needs to do.Another group that should also be considered a bit of a no-brainer is the group or department, or in many cases, the individual responsible for records.This person may be by title the compliance officer, records manager, IT security or legal counsel, regardless they are responsible for the information policy management of the organization.And lastly, but certainly not least we must include someone, or some group that represents the line of business worker, or end-user. Surprisingly, I have seen this last group consistently excluded from the planning process.Not because they are a problem or difficult to work with, but because the people that are actually going to use the solution are often an afterthought, or as IT would consider them: the customer.DO NOT forget to include this group!At the end of the day they will literally make or break the deployment’s success causing problems for both those other groups at the table as they won’t understand the technology (frustrating IT) or they don’t execute according to policy (putting the company at risk). Once we have the right contributors at the table we can start to define the governance strategy.When people are defining their governance strategy I always promote that they ask themselves a few key questions to help better understand what they want to do, who it will affect and what they need to do it.Once these questions have been answered a plan can be more easily defined. The first question is: do you understand your content?This is very important and can also be made as a statement: know your content!We have content broadly spread across our environment, not just in SharePoint.If we are planning to move large portions of that content into SharePoint – file share replacement is one of the top uses of SharePoint – think about what you are moving over.Is this relevant data? Is this data that must live under compliance?Is this duplicate data?Is this active data? This last question is an important one to consider in terms of SharePoint.SharePoint is an active content solution, and a relatively costly place to store content.If you are moving massive volumes of data into SharePoint it just does not make sense to move old, inactive content into SharePoint from a cost perspective.This content should move directly into an archive that lives on a lower and cheaper tier of storage. Once again we must consider “the who” for a second here.Even though we are moving content out of SharePoint and into a more cost effective compliant place we cannot forget that users should be able to access it or restore it (permissions pending) directly from SharePoint. My next question is: what are your specific compliance requirements?This varies widely from company to company and industry to industry – every company has corporate policies specific to their internal requirements, and many companies have to adhere to industry regulations.SharePoint does a great job of managing the content in SharePoint as records, but does an even better job when supported by partners.As broad as SharePoint’s records capabilities are when it comes to supporting industry regulations and government guidelines like the Department of Defense 5015.2 (DoD 5015.2), physical records and records living outside of SharePoint’s native repositories a third-party add-on solution is a requirement. And for my last question, we go back to “the who” again: How will we govern the people?Again, for most, information governance has to do with the information, but we must also be sure to govern the people if we are going to be successful.This question relates to how we are enabling people to leverage the core strengths of SharePoint, and this all starts with the creation of Sites and filling them with content.Organizations have to have a Site provisioning plan in place or they risk putting the organization as a whole at risk.Site sprawl is not just a myth, it is a reality, but it doesn’t have to be feared.Attaching a lifecycle and policies to a Site at the point of creation will ensure that Sites are connected to the data center and can be managed under the watchful eye of IT.Not only this, but we can now monitor those same sites and move them to the appropriate tier of storage once they have become dormant or inactive.Site provisioning allows organizations to permit the creation of as many or as few sites required all in a controlled fashion. As you can see, understanding “the who” when defining your governance strategy for SharePoint is a pretty big deal.Not to downplay the value of process or technology, but to use an analogy: it is the person that drives the car down the right road, and it really helps when that person knows where they’re going.Just like a good governance plan for SharePoint, people who drive cars will get to their destination faster if they have good maps. To find out more, join me on February 21st at noon EST where I’ll be participating in the webinar Extending SharePoint Across Your Information Infrastructure. You’ll learn key concepts required to turn SharePoint into a multifaceted, stable, and powerful IT tool set.

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Could Anyone Else Use an Extra $600,000?

Submitted by: Process Matters Blogger on: February 6, 2012 I am supplementing my Q&A series on the Value of EA & BPA with a wonderful article published on January 30th about one our customers, Chubb Insurance, written by Madeline Weiss, Society for Information Management’s Advanced Practices Council. Thereis nothing like a great story toillustrate some of the waysenterprise architecture initiatives are demonstrating value to thebusiness. I hope you’ll take a few minutes to read the article becauseit highlights some of the specific ways Chubb has organized its team aswell asthe company’s commitment to make architecture less about theprocess and more about adding value to actual business. The result? A comprehensive partnership between IT and the lines of business that supports more effective decision making; Faster time to market; The ability to leverage sharable components, practices, technologies, and process across their federated organization. Throughthis process they achieved real savings – like the $600,000 in 2010just by identifying and then redistributing unused software licenses. Notcovered in this story is Chubb’s use of both enterprise architecturetools and business process management technology to support theoperationalization of the gaps in business performance that can beautomated and improved with business process management. You can readmore about EA and BPM working together by downloading this Gartner Whitepaper. I’llbe back soon with more on the how the evolution of EA and BPA areimpacting the tools provided to address the needs of architects.

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5 Tax-Compliance Questions You Should Include in Any e-Invoicing RFP

e-Invoicing promises significant benefits.  But, if you deal with suppliers or customers in countries that collect Value-Added Taxes (VAT) you must be certain that your e-invoicing solution enables you to easily comply with the varying country-specific e-invoicing regulations.  Otherwise, you could be subject to sanctions, including fines and the possibility of having to repay already-deducted VAT amounts, which averages 20 percent of transaction values. So, be sure to include the following five questions in your e-invoicing RFP to ensure you end up with a long-term, sustainable solution that meets your needs. 1.      Data Requirements – Does the solution support varying country-specific data requirements? If so, which ones, and how are they implemented? Countries vary in their requirements for the data content of electronic invoices. For example, a UK invoice is required to display the place of legal seat but not the legal form of the company, while a French invoice is required to display both.  Australia requires little information about the company itself to be on the invoice, but requires transactional details such as item quantities, item prices, VAT rates, and VAT amounts. Mexico and Brazil require invoices to be dynamically registered in tax authority systems and information provided by these authorities must be included on invoices. Your solution must include the data required by the laws of each government in addition to those of the buyer and supplier. 2.      Authenticity and Integrity – Does the solution support varying country-specific requirements for guaranteeing the authenticity and integrity of electronic invoices?  If so, which ones, and how are they implemented? Different countries allow different methods for ensuring the authenticity and integrity of electronic invoices. These include digitally signed EDI invoices, digitally signed PDF invoices and non-signed EDI invoices. When using digital signatures for signed EDI or signed PDFs in the European Union, some member states require software-based electronic signatures – called “advanced” electronic signatures– while others require one of a variety of hardware-based electronic signatures – called “qualified” electronic signatures. In other member states, digital signatures are an option rather than mandatory, but your trading partner may still insist on their use. For example, in Spain it is a common business practice to digitally sign EDI invoices even though digital signatures are not mandated by law. Most countries permit EDI invoices without the addition of digital signatures as described above as the official legal invoice for tax audit purposes. This is sometimes referred to as “non-signed” or “un-signed EDI.” Electronic data interchange (EDI) has been a popular method of exchanging electronic invoices for more than 20 years and, when the invoices are exchanged within a secure network, the authenticity of their origin and the integrity of the content is ensured. However, some countries may still require additional compliance documentation. For example, France requires a comprehensive trading partner list and a daily, automatically generated invoice summary report to be available during an audit in addition to the legal invoice.  In many countries, tax auditors will also request human readable copies of your EDI invoices.  Your e-invoicing solution must be able to provide such additional compliance documentation as required on a country-by-country basis. If your company deals with suppliers or customers in different countries your solution must be able to automatically identify the appropriate rules to apply and support all the variations. 3.      Archiving – How does the solution provide invoice archiving? One of the major components of the country-by-country e-invoicing regulations is the requirement that both buyer and supplier archive the legal invoice—the digitally signed PDF, the digitally signed EDI document, or the non-signed EDI document. In the case of digitally signed documents, the electronic-signature certificate proving the integrity of the invoice must be stored as well. All archived invoices must be rendered in a human-readable format upon request of the tax auditor. In the case of non-signed EDI, some countries such as France also require the archival of additional compliance documentation, such as the comprehensive trading partner list and daily invoice summary, including invoice number, amount due and an electronic audit trail to provide validation that an invoice was indeed processed and delivered without any modification. All data must be stored in accordance with the local data protection laws. Many countries require the archival of digital invoices for extended time frames, which may be as long as 11 years. Furthermore, some regulate the location of the archive — within a country or a region. Your e-invoicing solution must allow for these data storage requirements in a secure environment, while providing an audit trail of all transactions. 4.      How does the solution speed compliance with auditor requests? Government authorities frequently conduct audits to ensure compliance with all necessary regulations. These audits can be extremely time-consuming and resource-intensive. Time spent gathering and providing information to the auditor is time that these resources are not working on their normal activities and projects.  Furthermore, you must be able to provide the auditors with your legal invoices in human-readable format upon request.  If your legal invoices are signed or non-signed EDI invoices, they must be quickly and easily converted as needed.   Your solution should enable you and/or the tax auditor to easily search the electronic archive for any and all invoices in question with minimal effort. 5.      How does the solution keep up with frequently changing tax regulations? e-Invoicing regulations around the world are changing regularly. As these changes occur, they may require updates to your solution to ensure that it remains compliant with local laws and that it fulfils the requirements of local tax authorities. The e-invoicing solution should include a facility to ensure that the system is always updated to reflect the latest changes in the regulations.

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