Compliance

Document Accessibility Expertise: The Power of (the Right) Collaboration

When Actuate started developing their high-volume PDF Document Accessibility Solution, they knew they needed to collaborate with the right organization: The American Foundation for the Blind (AFB), an industry expert with a proven track record of helping organizations achieve compliance and deliver content that is truly accessible to individuals with disabilities. A national non-profit group, the American Foundation for the Blind is well known for its work with the visually impaired community; activist Helen Keller spent over 40 years working with them. Among its goals, AFB aims to broaden access to technology and promote independent and healthy living for people with vision loss. “We are pleased to be teaming with Actuate to ensure that the process of PDF remediation runs as smoothly and as quickly as possible,” says Paul Schroeder, Vice President, Programs and Policy Group at the AFB. “We are confident this collaboration will support our goal of generating equal opportunities for the millions of people with vision loss.” “We are eager to help the AFB spread awareness regarding the importance of providing readily accessible electronic content to those with vision loss,” adds Shannon Kelly, Accessibility Expert and Evangelist for the Content Services Group at Actuate. This collaboration has helped Actuate develop and test their PDF Accessibility Solution, ensuring that they meet the commitment to making online documents accessible and keep up with two main goals: Creating a technology that would fill a void in the marketplace by offering users with disabilities, including the visually impaired, an opportunity to interact with their transactional data online and on-demand. This technology would also enable customer-facing organizations to deliver a barrier-free experience to all. Offering a solution that would allow organizations to provide high-volume documents in an accessible, fast and easy way. This solution would automate the creation of accessible PDF documents, seamlessly integrate with the processes that are already in place, and ensure compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Section 508 of the US Rehabilitation Act, WCAG 2.0 and other standards and regulations. Actuate wanted to do all of that while also considering current trends within the blind and reading-disabled community. For instance, one U.S.-based study found that only 10% of visually impaired children are learning Braille today and, among adults, less than 10% know Braille. It is clear that organizations such as banks or healthcare groups need alternative ways to communicate with their visually impaired customers. For more information on the Actuate/AFB collaboration, read the recent press release announcing the news. Document Accessibility Best Practices As part of the collaboration, Actuate and AFB will continue to help organizations understand the legal requirements and needs of the reading-impaired community to build successful strategies for compliance and providing universal access to electronic content for all. To support this initiative, Actuate and AFB have recently co-authored a white paper, PDF Document Accessibility: Regulations, Risks and Solutions for Compliance. Read the Introduction below and download the full white paper here. “This paper discusses best practices for banks and other financial institutions, insurance, healthcare, and a myriad of other institutions wishing to accommodate their customers who are blind or visually impaired regarding access to account statements and other financial and personal information in electronic formats. It will detail applicable federal laws/regulations requiring financial and other institutions to provide information in accessible formats and outline traditional problems related to meeting those requirements. Finally, this paper will focus on a solution for overcoming the problems and meeting the requirements while delivering a quality customer experience”.

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Santa Deploys the ‘Internet of Things’ Across his North Pole Operations

Over the past five years I have been providing updates on one of our more secretive customers based out of a large factory in the North Pole. Nearly all of our B2B solutions have been implemented across the supply chain and distribution network of the big man himself, Santa Claus. I have listed five years worth of project updates below, simply click on the web links to learn how cloud B2B integration helps Santa with his operations. 2008 – GXS Managed Services chosen to support Santa’s new B2B hub, GXS Intelligent Web Forms deployed to create SantaNet 2009 – Santa completes deployment of GXS Managed Services and begins to embrace social media tools 2010 – Santa evaluates how cloud computing and mobile devices could improve North Pole operations 2011 – GXS Active Community (formerly RollStream) gets rolled out across Santa’s trading partner community to improve day to day collaboration across his Present Delivery Network and he also gets nominated for B2B Hero award by GXS 2012 – Santa begins to evaluate the information flowing across SantaNet and implements a Big Data strategy Five years on from the initial discussions with Santa’s IT team I have just returned from a three day trip to the North Pole. Getting an audience with Santa has always been difficult, especially this time of year, and it was whilst I was returning from a business trip to Amsterdam that I received an email from one of his many assistants. “Please can you come up to Santa’s factory in the North Pole as he would like to update you on how we have expanded our Present Delivery Network Hub during 2013. A seat has been reserved for you on ELF001 which will be leaving from Schipol Airport at 21:00hrs” I cancelled my flight home and boarded ELF001, a 747 ‘DreamLifter’ up to the North Pole International Airport. I showed a picture of one of these aircraft in last year’s update and it always amazes me how much you can fit into one of these aircraft, Santa leases several of these aircraft each year to help with the distribution of over 520million presents to his global network of Present Distribution Hubs. When I arrived at Santa HQ I was whisked through the fast track security channel, (security is normally tighter here than any TSA check point found at North American airports) I was taken straight to the ‘Project Dasher’ war room where the global deployment of GXS Managed Services was initially masterminded from. In the corner of the room was Santa, sitting by the fire reading a copy of our new EDI Basics book (download a copy HERE). One thing you quickly learn about Santa, probably due to the nature of his job, is that he knows most of the IT and technology trends that have made news in recent years. Santa always looks for ways to continuously improve his operations and during 2013 he has been implementing a new project relating to the ‘Internet of Things’. The Internet of Things basically relies on machine to machine connectivity via the internet to exchange real time information from one device to another. ‘The Internet of Santa’s Things’ (IoST) has now been deployed across his entire operation. Santa already had good visibility across his operations but the connected nature of the Internet of Things has meant that he has been able to take enterprise wide visibility to an entirely new level. Santa already had his trading partners connected to his Present Delivery Network Hub and last year he spent a lot of time implementing a Big Data strategy to analyse information flowing across this platform. Santa quickly realised that if he could somehow connect his digital and physical supply chains together then he would obtain even greater operational efficiencies. However there was one major stumbling block to deploying IoST, he had to connect every machine or piece of equipment to the internet. Santa decided to extend this still further by connecting every employee and reindeer to IoST as well, but more on this later. Santa had to sign partnership agreements with numerous network and industrial automation providers as well as one of the world’s largest mobile network companies to allow all aspects of his operation to connect with IoST. Every piece of equipment that needed to be connected to IoST had to have a WiFi card connected to the machine or equipment’s main control board. The extended real time connectivity that IoST now provides allows Santa to obtain some interesting insights into his operation. Here are just a few examples of how IoST is beginning to help Santa’s operation. Every piece of warehouse and logistics equipment within Santa’s global network of Present Distribution Hubs is now connected to the Internet. Increased connectivity across his distribution network has helped to remove traditional blind spots where inventory levels had previously been difficult to monitor. Every stock movement via ‘internet connected’ machines such as fork lift trucks and pallet movers can now be accounted for and this provides a more accurate view of inventory levels. Given the tight schedule that Santa has over the Christmas period, every second saved through improved visibility helps to improve the overall service to his customers, the children of the world. Closed loop processes were implemented to allow the automatic ordering of toy parts. As soon as the level of parts inventory fell below a certain level, sensors in the storage bins sent a message to the order management system and electronic orders for new parts would be sent directly to the supplier with no elf intervention at all. This closed loop ordering process has helped to significantly reduce buffer stocks of toy parts which are now ordered on demand, as they are required. Santa’s army of warehouse associates, elves, work in warehouses ten times the size of Amazon’s largest warehouse in the world. To improve elf productivity it is important for presents to be located quickly in their respective storage locations within the warehouse. In order to maximise efficiency, each elf has been issued with Google Glass which helps to locate specific presents in the warehouse and provide instant access to product information. The extensive network of sensors and other connected devices transmit a constant stream of information across the warehouse and factory locations. Google Glass provides one of many visual ‘entry points’ into information flowing across Santa’s Present Distribution Network. The North Pole Union of Elves (NPUE) has been keeping a close eye on the working environment of Santa’s elves in recent years. The elves work tirelessly during the Christmas period to fulfil ‘orders’ from the little children of the world and to protect the health of the elves, they have been issued with a slightly modified Jawbone device which they can wear on their wrists during the working day. The Jawbone device helps to monitor the work, health and sleep patterns of each elf. As each elf clocks out at the end of each day, information from their Jawbone device is uploaded to a central database and the health of each elf is analysed overnight to ensure they are working within the union’s guidelines. So as well as machines being connected to IoST, every one of the 10,567 elves are connected to IoST as well. Santa started to implement a Big Data strategy in late 2012 but now with every machine and elf connected to IoST, Santa has a huge amount of data available to him which helps to make improved and better informed management decisions. Santa heard from one of the leading industry analysts that Big Data Analytics was going to become a more important area in coming years and this is why Santa has now decided to sponsor a degree at a local Elf University which will help elves analyse these rich data sets and essentially become world leading information scientists. The scale of Santa’s operation is huge and so are his energy bills to run his numerous factories and distribution facilities. Santa’s business is at the heart of an area often depicted in news reports relating to global warming and for this reason Santa has an added interest in preserving the environment. The Internet of Things presented Santa with an opportunity to monitor energy levels across his facilities and take corrective action to improve the energy efficiency of these operations. Over the past year Santa has built up a global network of technology partners, one example was Google discussed earlier and another is NEST, a producer of leading edge thermostats and smoke detection systems. These devices are installed in every major work area of Santa’s operation and each device is connected to IoST. They allow Santa to remotely monitor and control the temperature to ensure his elves have an optimum environment to work in. Santa also worked with local water supply and electricity companies to find ways of monitoring energy usage. Power for his factories and warehouses can be supplied from either water based power generation equipment located under the Arctic ice flows or the giant solar panels and wind turbines that have been installed across the North Pole. Santa takes great pride in the operational efficiency of his elves on the production lines as they are assembling toys. To improve his levels of factory automation, Santa has also worked with leading industrial automation companies to install automatic assembly and packaging machines. Needless to say these pieces of production equipment have also been connected to IoST. In fact since connecting to IoST the production line has experienced virtually zero downtime. This is due to the ‘predictive maintenance’ processes that have been put in place. In the old days Santa’s maintenance elves would carry out preventative maintenance on production equipment but with the introduction of IoST, Santa decided to implement a predictive maintenance process that would harness the information being transmitted from each machine and allow them to make decisions on whether parts needed replacing. This process has been so successful that even Santa’s contract manufacturers have connected their production equipment to IoST so that they can leverage the benefits of predictive maintenance. Some people think that Santa’s reindeer have some form of nuclear power source as they are able to go around the world in a matter of hours. In fact following the elves adoption of Jawbone devices, Santa thought it was only fair to ensure the well-being of the other key members of his extended staff, his herd of reindeer. Santa had read in a recent edition of Wired magazine that some scientists had experimented with health monitoring chips embedded under the skin to monitor key functions of the body. Santa worked with one of the world’s leading universities conducting research into improving animal health, to see if a chip could be embedded under the skin of a reindeer. This would allow the reindeer’s health to be monitored remotely 24/7. The chip monitors nearly a dozen key body functions and this information is transmitted back to Santa HQ via IoST every minute so that if necessary Santa can replace a reindeer as and when required and thus ensure that the herd of reindeers are working to their optimal performance. Santa’s sleigh contains nearly as many sensors as a Formula One race car. The 150 sensors placed at strategic points on the sleigh monitor everything from speed, sleigh distortion, temperature, weight and on board inventory levels. The information from ‘Sleigh Force One’ is transmitted to Santa HQ via IoST. The burst of information, nearly 2Gb worth of data, is transmitted every five minutes and is archived on a bank of storage devices within Santa’s newly upgraded data centre. Remember those barges mysteriously floating off the California coast recently? Google said that they were going to become facilities for show casing new products. In fact one of the barges is actually a new data centre that was recently towed up to the Arctic Circle. This data centre is at the hub of Santa’s IoST infrastructure. A team of elves located in the Mission Control facility at Santa’s HQ are constantly monitoring the sleigh to make sure it is perfectly balanced and optimised during its journey through some of the harshest weather conditions around the world. Santa’s sleigh also contains a temperature controlled locker and sensors placed on presents stored in this locker ensure that the temperature is maintained to a specific level. The one other area where IoST has been applied is with the presents themselves. Whilst on the sleigh, sensors monitor the condition and temperature of the presents. However when they are dropped down a chimney the sensors switch mode and start transmitting information about its condition after being delivered. As presents are sent out from Santa HQ, two identifying labels are automatically applied to each present. One label has an embedded RFID device which is directly linked up to IoST and the second label is essentially a QR code. This QR code is applied for the purposes of the children’s parents. The QR code once scanned, takes you to a website which not only shows what the present is, but includes downloadable instructions etc, more importantly it describes how the packaging should be recycled or disposed of. This initiative alone has helped boost Santa’s green credentials and as the information is transmitted across IoST it has helped Santa achieve REACH and RoHS compliance to ensure materials are disposed of safely. Following the implementation of IoST, Santa also upgraded SantaPAD, a mobile app that was developed last year to help him keep track of his operations whilst he was delivering presents around the world. SantaPAD v2.1 now provides details of every device connected to IoST, through a machine to machine equivalent of Facebook, and this means that Santa can effectively monitor the ‘pulse’ of his operations from anywhere in the world by simply using his iPad app. So it has been quite a year for Santa, each time I visit he manages to extend the functionality of his IT infrastructure in a different way. Santa’s Internet of Things strategy has been his most ambitious project to date and it seems to have stretched into every area of his operations. I think it certainly provides a great case study in terms of how other companies could deploy the Internet of Things across their own production and logistics operations and I am sure Santa will be open to showing companies around his new and fully connected operation. 2014 will see many companies start to embrace the Internet of Things and Santa’s big bang approach to rolling out IoST across his operations has worked out well but not every company will want to take this approach. Providing an update on Santa’s B2B platform traditionally means that this is one of my last blogs of the year and so with this in mind I just wanted to offer season’s greetings and best wishes for 2014, See you next year !  

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Common Ground: A Roundtable Discussion on the Future of Connectivity

During a recent roundtable discussion, GXS and its financial services clients held a rousing discussion about key trends affecting the Future of Connectivity and the complexity faced in serving corporate clients. With representatives from North American and European financial institutions, the discussion aimed to provide thought leadership on key trends affecting financial services innovation. Prior to the financial services roundtable, the participants received “Your Solution to Pain-Free Corporate-to-Bank Connectivity”, a white paper commissioned by GXS from industry analyst Jeanne Capachin, formerly of IDC Financial Insights and Meridian Research. Jeanne’s white paper served as a jumping off point for the roundtable discussion. Jeanne moderated a discussion of the key trends affecting innovation across financial services segments: Improving the Client Connectivity Customer Experience The roundtable participants are dealing with a complex set of connectivity solutions that they are maintaining on behalf of their key customers. Complexity arises from diverse formats, protocols, handshakes and standards. This complexity is driving financial services firms to outsource to third party integration providers to avoid further investment in disparate, one-off solutions. Firms are also looking to experts in client onboarding to quickly get clients enrolled in products and services, accelerating “time to revenue.” Ever-Growing Regulatory Compliance Regulatory changes around the global are impacting financial institutions’ ability to invest scarce technology resources in new product development and innovation. Firms in North America and Europe are deep in the thick of meeting the requirements of Dodd-Frank and the Payment Services Directive, respectively. Evolving industry standards As regulations are ever-growing, industry standards are ever-evolving. Evolving industry standards can be viewed as an expensive burden or an opportunity to drive innovative change. But in the meantime, financial institutions must support both legacy and next generation industry standards for file formats. This is especially true for banks implementing SEPA, who face a looming February 2014 deadline. Conclusion The most important message from the event was this: By working together and finding common ground, banks and vendors can help to take the lead in customer experience, standards development and regulatory change – ensuring that as an industry we deploy technology effectively and manage change at a safe, but aggressive pace. Click here to read a full synopsis of the roundtable discussion, titled “Common Ground: GXS and Financial Services Firms Discuss the Future of Connectivity.” And to find out how GXS Managed Services can help you manage complex client connectivity requirements, click here.

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Top Ten Trends that will Impact Automotive Supply Chains in 2014

I recently published my thoughts on some of the key high tech related industry trends for 2014, so now I thought I would follow up this blog with my predictions on what could happen across the automotive industry in 2014. The industry is going through an exciting period of change with significant global expansion, introduction of new technologies and a global desire to introduce greener vehicles. So let me now outline some of the key supply chain and B2B related trends that are likely to impact the global automotive industry in 2014: Increased adoption of global vehicle platforms will simplify and consolidate supply chains – companies such as VW Group have proven that if implemented correctly, global car platforms can bring significant benefits to an automotive manufacturer. Despite the initial high investment, consolidated suppliers/parts/sub systems, simplified production systems and logistics flows all contribute to justify the investment. With the trend for global expansion growing, especially by Far Eastern automotive companies at the moment, I would expect more automotive manufacturers to start rolling out global car platforms or vehicle architectures during 2014. ‘Internet of Automotive Things’ becomes more deeply embedded within both vehicle and production environments – 2013 saw the ‘Internet of Things’ go mainstream. 2014 will see all participants in the automotive supply chain working to get their ‘machines’ connected to the internet. Production equipment, logistics networks, and aftermarket service infrastructures will become connected to a common enterprise platform to allow information flows to be analysed and acted upon. Every car manufacturer will begin to offer a ‘connected car’ within their respective range of vehicles. Automotive OEMs follow Tesla and BMWs lead by developing dedicated electric vehicle brands – exponential growth in sales of Tesla and BMW i-Series electric vehicles in 2014 will see many other vehicle manufacturers introduce dedicated platforms and sub brands for their electric vehicles. So far many car manufacturers have decided to enter the electric vehicle market by ‘electrifying’ existing vehicle platforms. From a packaging point of view many of these vehicles are not suitable for housing large battery packs or electric motors. To be successful in 2014, vehicle manufacturers will have to follow Tesla and BMW’s lead by developing dedicated, lightweight and ‘connected’ vehicle platforms China accelerates global expansion plans with acquisition of key suppliers and struggling western OEMs – China has so far failed to set the world alight with some of their own car brands. Lack of quality, limited brand awareness and having to compete against strong western brands has all contributed towards China’s limited global expansion of its domestic automotive industry. Increasing wealth in China will see a continued stream of western companies being acquired by Chinese manufacturers, the acquisition of Volvo Cars by Geely has shown how successful this can be. What if Chinese domestic OEMs could sign agreements in 2014 to use under-utilised production facilities in Europe and North America? This would serve to increase production levels globally, China would get a foothold in other markets and the whole supply base becomes rejuvenated. Adoption of Cloud B2B platforms accelerates due to continued consolidation of global ERP and legacy B2B environments – The continued globalisation of the automotive industry in 2014 will see stronger efforts to upgrade old legacy B2B environments. Continued expansion into the ‘2nd wave’ of emerging markets in 2014 will require an extension of IT infrastructures into North Africa, Vietnam and Thailand. Limited IT skills in these countries will see cloud based solution being deployed to allow all suppliers to be connected to a centralised B2B hub. The introduction of ‘connected plants’ to support strategies relating to the Internet of Things will see increased levels of consolidation amongst ERP instances to provide a single view of ERP information across multiple automotive plants. Automotive OEMs form alliance to lobby regional governments to invest in electric charging infrastructures – range anxiety is the number one barrier to electric vehicle adoption and the automotive industry is going to need the help of regional governments if they are to overcome this barrier. Cities such as Amsterdam have successfully implemented charging networks and even manufacturers such as Tesla have decided to fund the development of their own charging infrastructure to help drive electric vehicle adoption in the market. However if automotive companies are going to meet stringent government set emissions targets by 2020 then the government should be investing in regional charging infrastructure investment policies to provide an incentive for consumers to make the switch to electric vehicles. 3D printing technology matures and moves from conceptual design applications to limited use in production environments – this technology has been around for more than twenty years but in 2013 it was introduced to the general consumer. Automotive companies have been using 3D printing technologies for rapid prototyping at the concept design stage of a vehicle’s development for many years. Increased awareness of this technology will now see it begin to be deployed in certain production and aftermarket service situations where parts can be manufactured at a production or service centre location. Production of castings and housings will be one of the initial beneficiaries of this particular technology in 2014. More countries adopt global B2B communication and message standards to support international operations – increased globalisation of production has complicated logistics flows and supplier on-boarding initiatives. We are already seeing ERP and B2B platforms being consolidated to support these global operations. In 2014 we will see an increased interest in adopting global standards such as OFTP2 for communications and the soon to be introduced global message set being developed by the German automotive industry. In 2014 I would expect to see more regions follow Germany’s lead in using global standards. I would also expect regional industry associations such as AIAG in North America and JAMA in Japan to take a close look at the EDIFACT based global message set (which is being developed by manufacturers such as VW Group, BMW, Hella and Bosch) to see how they can be applied in their own countries. Strategic partnerships announced between high tech and automotive OEMs – Over the past few years we have seen a number of strategic partnerships being announced between for example Panasonic and Toyota, Ford and Microsoft. In 2014 I would expect to see a new generation of partnerships emerging thanks to the increased interest from consumers to connect their electronic devices to in-car entertainment systems. To date we have seen traditional consumer electronics vendors form partnerships with the automotive industry, moving forwards I would expect to see Google, Apple and other consumer centric high tech brands develop stronger relationships with the automotive industry. Will downloadable apps become common place in 2014?, will wearable devices interact with vehicles?, will Google’s Android and Apple’s IOS platform form the basis of future in car software platforms? Europe and other regions follow North America in rolling out regulations to minimise use of conflict minerals – North America is one of the first countries to try and significantly reduce the amount of conflict minerals flowing across supply chains. New regulations being introduced in 2014 by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) in North America will require companies to demonstrate that they are not using conflict minerals as part of their supply chain operations. In 2014 I would expect Europe, Japan and other key industrialised regions to begin evaluating the implementation of their own conflict minerals reporting laws. AIAG in North America has already been working extensively with the automotive industry in North America, I would expect them to work closely with other industry associations such as Odette in Europe and JAMA in Japan to share key learnings and best practices. This will help to develop a unified approach to the removal of conflict minerals from global automotive supply chains during 2014.

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Financial Services Blogs: Top 10 for 2013

As the year draws to a close, the GXS Financial Services team looks back at our Top 10 for 2013 blogs. These posts encompass developments across the financial supply chain including international expansion, transaction banking, corporate treasury, and e-invoicing. These blogs were chosen based on their Google Analytics ranking, newsletter readership and my personal views. 1. Jerome Tillier in Banking on B2B: A Guide to SEPA Penalties and the True Costs of Failed Transactions “What happens if a Bank, Corporate or Payment Services Supplier (PSP) fails to comply with PSD and SEPA rules by February 1st 2014? What penalties are applicable if the wrong file format or bank identifiers are used? What deadlines and penalties has each Euro-area country implemented? …” 2. Jerome Tillier in Banking on B2B: The Entire Population of Malta could be Vice Presidents of Banks “As a child, I often played with my father’s Rolodex; flicking business cards around the rotary as fast as possible, then getting told off and asked to put back any pages that had fallen off in alphabetical order. Today, I’m the only person in the office who still uses a Rolodex filled with business cards. I sometimes give it a fast spin and let the odds decide who I should catch up with next…” 3. Patty Hines in Banking on the Cloud: Clear Out the Clutter: Modernize Your International Payment Communications “Are you in the process of upgrading your Treasury Management System (TMS)? So are many other Global 1000 organizations. At GXS, we work with dozens of multi-national corporations each year embarking on treasury transformation projects. Some are seeking better information about offshore cash…” 4. Jerome Tillier in Banking on B2B: Securities-Collateral for Dummies, Damage Free – Parts 1, Part 2 & Part 3 This three part series discusses “The world of collateral for securities and funds services. Collateral shortage, collateral management and systemic risk are three topics covered on a weekly basis by the financial media. In a series of short blogs, I will share with you the broader picture of what collateral is all about…” 5. Patty Hines in Banking on the Cloud: Focus on Regional Banking: Meeting the Needs of Increasingly Sophisticated Commercial Clients “Regional banks attract small and mid-sized businesses who want a more personalized approach or who want to reduce their reliance on the big banks for credit lines. In serving middle-market commercial customers, regional banks serve a profitable niche sometimes overlooked by the global banks…” 6. Jerome Tillier in Bank on B2B: Transaction Banking, a Game of Thrones – How to gain more share of the wallet “I’d like you to think about what your answer would be to the following question. Apart from chasing new customer acquisition and maximising customer retention, do you have a consistent strategy that you are executing with your key clients in order to increase your share of wallet over time?…” 7. Patty Hines in Banking on the Cloud: B2B Managed Services for Financial Services “When I joined GXS almost three years ago, I attended training on our core offering, GXS Managed Services. But as a veteran of the banking industry that term wasn’t familiar to me and I had a hard time understanding how B2B managed services was relevant to our financial services clients…” 8. Patty Hines in Banking on the Cloud: International Expansion in Financial Services “The topic of high frequency trading has been on the front page of newspapers throughout the year. Regulators are concerned that an elite group of hedge funds and algorithmic traders with these low latency trading capabilities threaten the stability and integrity of the markets. But while you hear a lot…” 9. Patty Hines in Banking on the Cloud: Financial Services International Expansion: Using Global Expertise to Meet Local Needs “It seems to me that there isn’t a single day that passes by without a market announcement, conference or opinion expressed about SEPA. Official implementation guidelines, rule books and even the official local language lexicon have existed for years through the European Payments Council…” 10. Denise Oakley in B2B Roundtable: Supply Chain Finance Market Growth “There are many reasons to be cautious when talking about trade finance growth in 2013. Back in January last year both the International Chambers of Commerce and International Monetary Fund predicted a dip in the demand for trade finance products. Many cited the lack of credit and liquidity for banks…” Stay tuned for our 2014 predictions as well as blog posts on corporate-to-bank networks, securities trends, regulatory compliance impacts, and more.

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The Need for Modern Electronic Archiving Solutions

With the increasing prevalence of smart devices in this fast-moving digital world, customers demand all information available whenever and wherever they choose. Whether it’s a credit card or savings account statement, pension or insurance documents, they want it at their fingertips Today, companies are looking for cost-effective repository solutions which can store virtually all document types and make them available to customers electronically with strict security and audit measures. These solutions will store documents only once and retrieve them in multiple formats (e.g. AFP for printing, PDF/Accessible PDF for e-presentment). Organizations also want a modern repository that is easy to deploy with minimum production in order to achieve maximum ROI in less time. Moreover, many companies are looking for an archiving solution which can replace their existing legacy ECM system or work in conjunction with their existing archiving systems to fulfill their new requirements. It is clear, that, when evaluating repository solutions, organizations take into account many factors, including business requirements, cost, and expected ROI, but technical characteristics of the solution and its performance remain the key for decision makers. Below are questions that Enterprise IT Managers often ask when assessing the capabilities of the Repository solution. These questions should be considered when comparing solutions, as they provide insight into how well the repository will perform and suit modern needs. Q. Can the Repository store print streams like AFP and Metacode? A repository must have the capability to store any print stream documents, including AFP, Metacode, PCL, TIFF, PDF, PDF/A and Accessible PDF formats. Additionally, the repository must have the capability to reduce storage requirements of PDF documents by using Document Storage Reduction technology. Q. Can the Repository be installed on Mainframe? What other platforms should it support? A modern repository can be installed on Mainframe and supports all major platforms like Windows, UNIX, AIX and all the flavors of Linux. Q. Can the Repository be deployed on the Cloud? The repository must have the capability to be deployed on any Cloud infrastructure. Q. Can the Repository store MS Office documents like Word, Excel, or Powerpoint? Can it also store other document types like HTML, or XML? A modern repository must support storage of virtually any document type (see Figure 1, demonstrating a common Repository interface screen). For commonly used formats like MS Office Word, Excel, Powerpoint, XML and others, it must have the capability to parse the document to extract metadata and use it as index values for the respective documents (Figure 2). Q. Can the Repository store customer emails? Can you analyze the emails in the Repository? A modern repository solution can store emails in their original format. The repository should also have the capability to parse emails for basic information like email address, subject, from, to, CC and other fields. In addition, the repository also needs to include an Analytics plugin to analyze emails and enable targeted marketing messages to customers. Q. Can I index the documents when loading into the Repository? Is there a facility to edit the index details later? A modern repository can index the documents either using metadata of the document or by extracting the main attributes (like account number, customer id, credit card number, etc.) in the content (Figure 3) and using them as index values. It also allows editing indexes after the loading process has been completed (Figure 4). Q. Can I search for the documents in the Repository? Yes, the repository must provide multiple interfaces to search documents in various application groups. This provides the capability to search on all index fields. It also enables customers to use plain SQL type operators like (=) equals, (>) greater than, (<) less than, and percent (%) (Figure 6). Q. Is it possible to access documents from legacy archives? Can I have a federated search from multiple ECM instances? A modern repository provides multiple connectors for major ECM providers like IBM CMOD, IBM File Net P8, EMC Documentum, IBM File Net Image Services, and Microsoft SharePoint (Figure 7). It must also connect to any ECM system (as long as it supports CMIS framework) using CMIS (Content Management Interoperability Service) Adapter. The repository can also create a federated layer to search documents from multiple ECM instances. Q. Are there any restrictions on volumes or number of documents to be stored? Can the Repository support billions of documents? A modern repository must be tailored to support high volume transactional output (HVTO). The solution should not only store high volume documents, but also process high volume transactions with ease. Q. Does the Repository support COLD archiving? What other storage technologies does it support? The repository must support COLD archiving. It provides a logical physical layer for storage and it is also agnostic of the storage medium used. With just a couple of configuration changes (Figure 8), it is possible to switch from one storage medium to another. The Repository supports multiple storage mediums like Hadoop , Centera etc. Q. Does the Repository convert print stream documents to PDF? Yes, the repository must have the capability to transform print stream documents to PDF on-the-fly whenever customers want to view the documents. Q. Does the Repository support Accessible PDF documents which would be suitable for individuals with disabilities, including the visually impaired? Does it comply with accessibility regulations? Yes. A modern repository must have the capability to to convert print stream documents or existing PDFs into Accessible PDF documents (Figure 9). Look for vendors that partner with multiple industry organizations in different regions across the globe to ensure that all Accessibility requirements are met. If you would like to learn more about Actuate’s Repository solution, download the Repository Datasheet or contact Actuate.

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OpenText Introduces Exceptional Fax Solution for Small-Medium Businesses

Today OpenText announced RightFax Express, an all-in-one fax solution that allows users to conveniently and cost-effectively fax from their desktop, email, back-end applications and Multi-Function Printer (MFP) devices. Simple to deploy and easy to integrate, RightFax Express offers a broad range of deployment options including appliance, on-premises fax server, or hybrid faxing. Small and medium-sized businesses face many of the same challenges as larger organizations when dealing with Information Exchange via fax. Security, cost and the ability to boost productivity are top of mind in evaluating a suitable solution. With laws increasingly mandating information governance and compliance, it is essential that businesses ensure confidential information remains safe and secure at all times. In addition, standalone fax machines represent costly investments when the efficiency of all employees who fax is taken into consideration. Gary Weiss, our senior vice-president Information Exchange and Cloud describes it this way: “OpenText RightFax Express provides a best-in-class fax solution for small and medium-sized businesses – it’s easy to implement and manage, efficient and versatile. In addition to the convenience factor, embedded security features such as direct delivery to a user’s inbox, automatic notifications, and tracking and reporting capabilities for auditing readiness, make RightFax Express an attractive one-stop shop for SMBs looking to reduce the costs and hassle of information exchange while increasing the productivity and efficiency of their organization.” OpenText RightFax Express offers the following key features: Quick, easy and secure information exchange – users can send and receive faxes right from their desk via email application, a web client or print-to-fax driver. Integration with email, MFPs, and desktop and back-end applications empower employees to fax from their preferred applications. Simplified administration – easily manage all users, devices, printers, cover sheets, reports, and system configuration with a user-friendly web-based interface regardless of deployment model. Comprehensive tracking and reporting – receive printed or emailed notifications of transmission status, track and manage failed faxes, and provide an electronic audit trail of all fax transmissions. The introduction of RightFax Express follows the introduction in November of this year of a fax solution serving large enterprises and mid-sized companies. That product offering, RightFax 10.6, is a new version of OpenText’s flagship on-premises fax solution best suited to larger organizations with strong integration requirements and high fax traffic, and having more complex deployment requirements. Further information on RightFax Express introduced today can be found here: www.opentext.com/rightfaxexpress and information on RightFax 10.6 can be found here: http://faxsolutions.opentext.com/rightfax-whats-new.aspx OpenText RightFax Express is one of the many offerings from the OpenText Information Exchange Suite of products, one of the five key pillars of the OpenText EIM strategy. OpenText’s Information Exchange Suite provides market-leading document exchange, messaging, and notification services for businesses ranging from the smallest offices to the largest enterprises. It can help deliver even the largest files swiftly, securely and reliably in the user’s preferred format, on-premises, or in the cloud. Availability OpenText RightFax Express is available worldwide with software supporting fifteen languages. For more information, please visit: www.opentext.com/rightfaxexpress

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EDI will Support Japan’s Implementation of the WCO SAFE Framework for Imported Goods

In June 2005 the World Customs Organisation (WCO) council adopted the SAFE Framework. This is a globally agreed set of standards to secure and facilitate global trade that acts as a deterrent to international terrorism, secures revenue collections and promotes trade facilitation worldwide. The facilitation of trade has been highlighted by many industry analysts as one of the key benefits as the framework provides a much higher level of visibility into activities across a global supply chain. Many countries have introduced their own variant of the SAFE framework, in the European Union, the European Summary Declaration (ENS) was introduced by the 27 member countries for all modes of transport. Mexico, Australia and Brazil have their own rules in place to support the framework and China is currently working on their own version of the rule. North America was one of the first to implement the ruling, partly to help minimise terror related activities and in early 2010 it extended the rule by introducing the ‘10+2’ compliance initiative. Under the 10+2 compliance ruling, before merchandise arrives in the United States, importers, customs brokers or freight forwarders must submit certain information, 10 data elements, namely the first eight no later than 24 hours before the cargo is loaded on its U.S bound vessel and then submit the last two no later than 24 hours prior to the ship’s arrival at a U.S port. Logistics Carriers must also submit two pieces of information, hence the name 10+2. In March 2014, Japan will become the latest country to adopt the SAFE Framework with the introduction of their Advanced Filing Requirement (AFR). The AFR goes into effect on 1st March 2014 and the penalty phase will apply ten days later on 10th March 2014. The Japan AFR requires all logistics companies to submit electronic shipping details 24 hours prior to the vessel’s departure for all Bill of Lading covering any goods that are intended to land in Japan. Japan will be getting tough on companies that do not submit information electronically with a potential $5,000 fine or a year in jail. A more serious option could be the Japanese Customs Agency refusing to issue a permit to discharge the cargo. To ensure compliance many companies have been collaborating with Nippon Automated Cargo and Port Consolidated System (NACCS), the private sector IT division of Japan Customs. NACCS has been working tirelessly over the past 12 months to try and educate the market on what is required to be sent to Japan Customs ahead of the shipment leaving its port of origin. NACCS requires nearly thirty pieces of information to be submitted and the exact data fields required can be found HERE The introduction of the WCO SAFE Framework has helped global customs and border control agencies to significantly improve the way in which they process inbound shipments and remove significant paperwork from their processes. It has also allowed Customs to modernise their IT infrastructures to support global carriers in a more efficient way. Improved visibility of information relating to inbound shipments has not only helped to minimise terror related activities but has also contributed towards a reduction in the amount of counterfeit goods or parts entering today’s global supply chains. As with other countries, Japan has decided that information to support AFR should be sent electronically via EDI, which is the global ‘language’ of today’s B2B activities across trading partner communities. Businesses today face an increasing amount of regulatory compliance and EDI adoption is helping companies adhere to these new regulations and ensure that the wheels of global trade continue turning.

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Daegis Streamlines Archive Collections for eDiscovery

Daegis AXS-One archive now delivers eDiscovery-ready custodian-level collections.  New functionality in the Daegis AXS-One Case Manager module enables organizations to more quickly and easily identify and collect archive data responsive to litigation or investigations. Using powerful search tools built into the archive user interface, clients can find, tag and collect data subject to a hold order. At the time of extraction, the archive collects and packages this data by custodian for loading into the hosted eDiscovery platform, Daegis Edge, without requiring further manipulation of the data. Using a hosted review platform for eDiscovery frees organizations from maintaining in-house software while giving them complete control of the review and production processes and of their data. Daegis streamlines the process of identifying responsive data in the archive and makes it readily available for eDiscovery without extra steps or moving the data through various software tools before it can be reviewed. Organizations have complete control of the discovery process from start to finish using the sophisticated case management tools built into the AXS-One archive, releasing only the data that is needed for a matter or investigation. The combination of the Daegis AXS-One Archive and the Daegis Edge eDiscovery platform provides organizations with purpose-built tools that safeguard their data in order to effectively manage information and respond to investigations and/or litigation.  

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Embracing Accessible PDF Documents: Key Learnings from the Accessibility Seminar in Toronto

First published on ECM Trends from the Field. We were joined by approximately 15 people in the Ontario Accessibility community earlier this autumn at an exclusive seminar we hosted at the Renaissance Hotel in Downtown Toronto. The presenters were Thomas Logan, Senior Accessibility Consultant from SSB Bart Group, Shannon Kelly – Accessibility SME from Actuate, Lou Fioritto, CEO of Braille Works International, as well as Jeff Williams, Director of Product Management, and Will Davis, Manager NA Presales, of Actuate. The presentations provided in-depth insight into the document accessibility problems facing organizations in Ontario in particular. We got some great content, which is, of course, tagged for accessibility. All presentations from the Seminar are available here. A few ideas really crystallized for us in this session. Shannon Kelly’s presentation – co-presented with Lou Fioritto, who is himself blind since birth – delivered a real-life experience using AT or Assistive Technology. Lou was able to give us a side-by-side narrative of using both incorrectly and correctly tagged PDF files. It was a real ear-opener! People with impairments use a screen reader such as JAWS to deftly navigate websites and PDF files and Lou showed how utterly frustrating it can be to attempt to work through a PDF bank statement with no headers, vaguely tagged graphics and tables with column headers but no row headers. Lou even commented that as a user, if you had to endure this, you’d just give up and get your information from another source! Shannon Kelly Accessibility SME Actuate Lou Fioritto Co-owner and Vice-President BrailleWorks This begs the question about the perception of PDF files within the visually/cognitively impaired community. Correctly tagged PDF files can now be created at their source and remediated with automation at high speed (see Figure 1 below). However, do decades of bad PDF with errant or no tags spoil it for today’s better PDFs? We suspect this will be debated in the coming months, but we are struck that HVTO (High Volume Transaction Output) content and the visually impaired community are just now beginning to intersect, some would say collide, at high speed. What’s compelling about PDF in HVTO is that it is a correct snapshot of a transaction oriented document with all the elements that accompanied that snapshot when it was created (i.e. logos, offers, signatures). PDF has become a de facto checkbox for those needing to comply with regulations that mandate multi-year retention of exact replica artifacts that can be produced in court. Ever hear of an insurance company coming to court with HTML representations of an insured’s date-stamped renewal notice? Nope, it’s all about PDF when the lawyers are involved. So, the thinking goes: “PDFs are not going away, so why not work with PDFs rather than other, less-structured, less-accepted formats?” Another idea that kind of blew us away was the immediacy of impending legal mandates, and for this we have to thank SSB Bart and some attendees from a top Canadian Financial Institution. First, in the US, both Title III of the ADA AND Section 508 are expected to be updated. Title III may be explicitly calling out websites as places of accommodation. Section 508 will likely point to and embrace WCAG 2.0. Both of these changes are expected by Spring 2014. In Ontario, the AODA states that if you host content on your website, the content must be accessible by January 2014, four short weeks from now. We’d like to thank our presenters and attendees. As usual, I think we learned as much at our seminar from the attendees as the other way around. It was an impressive show of community-smarts, and we were glad just to be associated. It was so successful, Actuate has decided to take the show on the road. The next installment will be held in Charlotte, NC on January 23, 2014 – check out the agenda and let us know if you are interested in taking part!

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How Does the Automotive Industry Plan to Embrace the New Dodd-Frank Conflict Minerals Law?

In an earlier blog entry I discussed how a new ruling being introduced in North America is likely to impact manufacturing supply chains around the world. The ruling will essentially make companies more accountable for where they source certain materials that go into their products. The Dodd-Frank Law relating to conflict minerals usage has been introduced to try and kerb the funding of rebel groups in the Democratic Republic of Congo and its immediate neighbouring countries. There are four key minerals, Tin, Tungsten, Tantalum and Gold, (collectively known as the 3TG minerals) that will be impacted by this ruling. For a more general introduction to 3TG minerals and how the Dodd-Frank law will impact their sourcing, please see my previous blog on this subject area, Click Here. The manufacturing industry is probably going to be the hardest hit by this new ruling as every manufacturer must be able to demonstrate what minerals are in their products, and more importantly where they were sourced from. The high tech and automotive industries are going to be severely affected by this ruling and in my previous blog I discussed what steps the high tech industry was taking to address this issue. This blog will briefly review how this new ruling will impact the automotive industry. The image below shows just a small selection of parts within a vehicle that are likely to use 3TG minerals in some shape or form. Tantalum is probably the more widely used mineral and is used in many different areas of a vehicle. Given a car may contain over three thousand individual components you can just imagine the huge task facing the OEMs to try and identify not just which components are using 3TG minerals, but the likely quantity as well. It has been estimated that just adhering to this new law will cost the automotive industry between $3 billion to $4 billion. With the reporting period underway already in North America and reports due to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) by 31stMay 2014, there is a growing sense of urgency amongst automotive companies to introduce compliance procedures for their supply chains. In April 2011, six manufacturers, Chrysler, Ford, General Motors, Honda, Nissan and Toyota issued a joint letter to their respective suppliers informing them of the new reporting requirements and requesting their cooperation in terms of identifying which parts may contain 3TG minerals. The six companies outlined three basic steps: Determine which parts/assemblies incorporate one or more of the identified conflict minerals or their derivatives Assess the supply chains associated with those parts/assemblies Engage with suppliers to identify the smelters used in a supply chain to process the conflict minerals or validate the origin of the conflict minerals as recycled/scrap In August 2012, the SEC finalised the rule for complying with conflict minerals provision of the Dodd-Frank Law. These rules, especially given the global nature of the automotive industry, have major implications for nearly every automotive company, not just in North America. Even companies headquartered outside of the US and those which do not report to the SEC, may be subjected to conflict minerals requests from customers who do report to the SEC or are in the supply chain of these companies or their tier suppliers. One of the key ways that companies make sure they achieve compliance is by ensuring that the internal organisation is aligned and the purchasing department will typically take the lead on this initiative. After all, the purchasing department is responsible for the day to day communications with the supply chain and they manage all communications and interactions. When you consider that there are over 190,000 automotive manufacturers and suppliers in the industry that are potentially involved, the route to compliance could potentially be a long and complex one. It will require significant resources to ensure compliance and make sure that filings are submitted to the SEC on time. The Automotive Industry Action Group (AIAG) has been working tirelessly to educate the industry over the last couple of years, on what they need to do to ensure compliance. They have taken the Electronic Industry Citizenship Coalition (EICC) conflict minerals reporting template and created their own web based version of the reporting tool to help companies survey their trading partner communities. A recent study by the analyst firm PwC, referenced in the chart below, highlighted some of the key challenges faced by the automotive industry with ensuring compliance across their supply chains. The biggest challenge highlighted by respondents to the survey said that getting accurate and complete information from relevant suppliers was going to be their biggest challenge. In fact 31% of respondents agreed that this would be the greatest challenge in terms of the conflict minerals compliance process. Being able to identify which companies across the automotive supply chain may be unknowingly supplying parts containing 3TG minerals is one challenge but then being able to reach out to them efficiently is another challenge altogether. One of the key challenges faced by many companies today is that contact information is potentially held within many different back end business systems and ensuring this data is up to date is an ongoing challenge. GXS Active Community is an enterprise wide collaboration platform that could potentially help to address this particular issue. By providing a web based collaboration platform that allows suppliers to update their own contact information as and when required helps to ensure that you can reach out to your supplier community in a more efficient manner. At the end of the day if a supplier wishes to do business with a prospective customer then it is in their own interest to at least make sure they are contactable. Active Community not only allows companies to keep up to date information about each and every supplier, it also provides a platform to send out regular communication to a trading partner community. Ensuring that suppliers adhere to various compliance procedures is becoming a key part of the trading partner management process today and Active Community can provide various tools to allow regular assessments to be sent out for completion by a supply base. For example the EICC reporting template could easily be replicated within Active Community, an example of which is shown below, and a supplier community would be able to use this platform to ensure that they meet the compliance requirements of the conflict minerals reporting law. As discussed earlier, it is not just companies in North America that will need to submit evidence to the SEC that their supply chains do not contain conflict minerals. The European Union completed a public consultation in June 2013 and a recommendation on necessary steps to be taken by European member countries will be announced by the end of 2013. The European Commissioner for Trade recently gave a speech on responsible sourcing of conflict minerals and his speech can be read here It is widely expected that the European Union will embrace the OECD framework highlighted in my earlier blog on this subject and it is expected that other regions will also embrace the framework moving forwards. Given that three Japanese OEMs were involved with the initial communication to their supply base in North America it is expected that Japan’s government will be taking a closer look at this initiative in the near future as well. The automotive industry is fortunate to have a proactive group of industry bodies, namely AIAG in North America, Odette in Europe and JAMA in Japan that are/will be willing to work closely with the regional suppliers to ensure that they meet the various compliance initiatives. Odette and JAMA will hopefully be able to utilise much of the initial work undertaken by AIAG to support their own conflict minerals reporting initiatives. I recently recorded a webinar relating to the area of conflict minerals and how GXS Active Community could be used as a potential reporting platform. GXS will make this webinar available shortly, so please feel free to register to learn more about the new conflict minerals law and how GXS can help ensure compliance across your supply chain.

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Introducing xECM for Oracle E-Business Suite

What an exciting week at Enterprise World as we announce so many new innovations! One of the great new ECM focused product offerings being announced is OpenText Extended ECM for Oracle® E-Business Suite. This new product brings together OpenText industry leading ECM with Oracle’s best-selling ERP system, E-Business Suite to drive productivity and governance within critical ERP-driven business processes. What does it do? Within Oracle E-business Suite, users work on business activities – processes driven by their ERP system. Some of the information they need lives outside the ERP environment – things like documents, spreadsheets, and mail are all information the ERP users need to complete their work. Extended ECM for Oracle® E-Business Suite (xECM for Oracle) creates a connection between the ERP system and the ECM system within the organization so that relevant content in the OpenText Content Suite can be viewed and worked on within the familiar E-Business Suite interfaces in the context of the process. This makes work easier, faster and more accurate for the E-Business users. Some of the people that work with ERP business processes are only occasional Oracle users. These people spend most of their day in their Office applications, email or within other common ECM environments. xECM for Oracle makes it easy for them to work on ERP driven processes by bringing all of the objects, relationships, and content together within their familiar Content Suite interfaces such as MS office, Outlook, SharePoint, web, and mobile. Everything they need is at their fingertips without needing to learn a new system. Content both inside and outside the ERP system needs to be governed consistently, ensuring compliance to regulations, protecting the content, keeping it as required for compliance, ensuring it can be discovered during investigation, and deleting it when allowed or mandated to do so. Because xECM for Oracle is built on the foundation of OpenText Content Suite , this information governance and security is built in. Content such as HR documents, purchase agreements, and contracts are managed through their lifecycle with the same consistency and rigor as the associated email, documents, and CAD diagrams. Organizations can ensure their regulations and policies are adhered to regardless of the source of the information. Extended ECM for Oracle® E-Business Suite from OpenText How is it built? OpenText are experts at integration between ERP and ECM. Many organizations benefit from the depth and breadth of offerings we have that extend the ECM platform to provide integration and specific solutions with SAP systems. This experience has been used to create a similar foundational integration between Oracle E-Business Suite and OpenText Content Suite . Integration is built as core extensions to the Content Suite Platform, tied directly into the foundation of Content Server so that administration and configuration of the ECM system automatically applies to the E-Business Suite components. Within the Oracle system, standard E-Business APIs are used so that ECM components are natural extensions to the infrastructure and common UI’s. The beautiful thing about the way this application is designed is that it works for all Oracle E-Business Suite processes within the Oracle HTML and forms based interfaces, and within standard ECM interfaces such as MS Office, SharePoint, web, and mobile. Let’s take the example of a project so we can walk through how the integration works. When the project is created in E-Business Suite, xECM for Oracle creates a workspace for the business objects within the project. The workspace shows the folders, structure, and relationships between objects. It reflects the users that have access, the metadata associated with the project and the content. This business workspace is made available to users within both the ERP and ECM systems. Transactional content is added within the Oracle system, unstructured content is added within the ECM system. All content is visible to users in their environment so they can work where they are comfortable. When users are given access to objects within the process, they are automatically given access to the workspace. Metadata and classifications associated with the project are automatically applied to all the related content. Information governance is provided on all of the content from both systems ensuring compliance and risk reduction for the organization without adding extra work for users. Costs are kept down due to archiving of content into the OpenText archive where content is compressed, de-duplicated and stored on appropriate media on premise, in the cloud or both. What are the key benefits? · Productivity gains through users getting consolidated access to ALL information surrounding the transaction · Increased user adoption as users work where they are comfortable · Increased accuracy because there is no lookup and manual copying of information from one system to another · Cost and risk reduction through information governance and archival · Compliance with regulation and corporate policy What is next? Extended ECM for Oracle® E-business Suite officially releases in March 2014. Expect to see future releases of this product with added functionality, solution blueprints, and perhaps packaged applications for critical processes such as project management. In future there may be similar integrations to other Oracle ERP systems. Learn more! There is more to see and learn about this exciting new offering from OpenText. Visit www.opentext.com/oracle for further information. To learn more about the release of Content Suite, visit www.opentext.com/content . Follow and join in our Twitter traffic this week with hashtags #OTEW2013 and #OracleECM.

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Clear Out the Clutter: Modernize Your International Payment Communications

Are you ready for the dawn of a new era for corporate-to-bank communications? Dr. Leo Lipis of Lipis & Lipis GmBH recently asked that question in a GXS webinar titled “Clear Out the Clutter: Modernize Your International Payment Communications.” The focus of the webinar is the need for streamlined payment solutions as international business speeds up. The session also includes a discussion of multi-platform, cross-channel corporate-to-business communication platforms such as EBICS and the use of SWIFT CGI messaging standards. Dr. Lipis laid out a number of business and technology drivers affecting payment communications for consumers, corporates, and banks both inside and outside of the euro area. Business Drivers Developments in the corporate to bank communication space are changing global commerce. SEPA and PSD2 will directly affect consumers, corporates, and banks Competition Consumer protection and choice Transparency Changes in Europe are significant for non-EU corporates and banks too … Although European banks and technology providers mitigate these challenges SAAS and cloud computing are enabling new operational and service models Technology Drivers Communication is changing to match the demands of modern payment methods Legacy standards appear to be in their last technology cycle Numerous initiatives are looking to help banks and corporates bridge the gap to ISO 20022 Protocols are undergoing similar changes Large corporates are being courted aggressively by SWIFT Many corporates also wish to use communication standards such as EBICS The variety is overwhelming SEPA, PSD2, EBICS and ISO 20022 The session outlined the challenges with SEPA compliance, particularly for small-to-medium enterprises (SMEs). Dr. Lipis quoted a survey that found that “46% of companies will have cash flow problems within 2 weeks” if there are unable to use direct debits. In addition to SEPA, another regulatory effort that will impact communications is the revised Payment Services Directive (PSD2) published on 24 July 2013. The PSD2 covers new services such as mobile payments and B2B transfers, and providers such as third-party payment initiation services. Other drivers such as the pan-European adoption of the EBICS communications protocol and the expansion of ISO 20022 XML corporate-to-bank initiatives are increasing the “clutter” that corporate treasurers and financial services firms must deal within in the near-term. For Dr. Lipis’s suggested solutions to clearing out the clutter and real-world examples of how institutions have simplified their payment communications, check out the recorded webinar and download the presentation slides here (registration required).

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Email Compliance Made Easy

Email Compliance Made Easy Secure email has a bad reputation for being a complicated and difficult undertaking. But when you stop and consider that 35 percent of all data loss incidents within enterprises come from email, it’s a compliance risk you need to gain control over right away. You have to be smart and make a plan for securing your organization. There’s no magic wand to instantly make your email compliant, but there are some important steps you can take to get started on the path to secure messaging. Get Smart about Regulations You can’t determine your compliance without knowing what you’re on the hook for first. Do you know which regulations apply to you and what they entail? What are you already doing to meet them? Do any of them overlap or contradict each other? Once you have a clear idea of what you’re responsible for, you can then determine how many compliance policies you require and what they need to include to put together a comprehensive plan. Know Your Data Is the data you’re sharing via email confidential? If you’re sharing personally identifiable information, the likelihood is that you are sharing information that is subject to regulation. Once you identify what it is, stop and ask, “Who really needs to have access to this?” and include appropriate access levels in your policies. That way when it comes time to integrate an email solution, you can put the proper protocols in place. Identify How Data is Leaking Out While you’re tracking your data, you may discover that your biggest fear has come true – you already have data leaking out from inside the organization. Before you can plug the leaks, you have to determine how and why they occurred so you can include the necessary precautions in your policies to prevent them moving forward. Find Solutions to Implement Your Policies Once your policies are in place, it’s time to identify the right set of solutions to help you achieve your compliancy goals. Having a solid security plan is important, but without the right systems to help you enforce them, your policies will be for naught. When looking for secure messaging, make sure that it incorporates end-to-end encryption, data leakage prevention, archiving, and antivirus solutions to help you address technical security safeguards. Choose Solutions that Integrate into Your Workflows You can create an intricate compliance policy and purchase secure email solutions, but your organization will still be at risk unless your solutions integrate into your existing workflows. If the solution interrupts your workflows or is so complicated your business users dread it, they won’t use it. You will end up being just as at risk for noncompliance as you were before this exercise, because users will find unsecure workarounds. Find the right solution and educate your users – secure email doesn’t have to be difficult. Want to learn more about secure email options and download the full whitepaper: 5 Steps to Improve Email Compliance? Visit our OpenText Secure Mail page and discover what simplified and integrated secure email in the cloud can do for you.

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A Guide to SEPA Penalties and the True Costs of Failed Transactions

What happens if a Bank, Corporate or Payment Services Supplier (PSP) fails to comply with PSD and SEPA rules by February 1st 2014? What penalties are applicable if the wrong file format or bank identifiers are used? What deadlines and penalties has each Euro-area country implemented? It is becoming increasingly important to be able to answer these questions because there are growing concerns about potential market disruption if businesses or banks are technically unable to send or receive payments. In a recent webinar, Dr Leo Lipis presented key findings, one of which is he estimates that 46% of European companies will have cash flow problems within 2 weeks (1), because they will be unable to use SCT/SDD, or because their clients and trading partners won’t be ready. To really frame the size of this issue at a country level, of the 736 businesses that responded to the Irish Small & Medium Enterprises (ISME) survey in May 2013 (2), 63% were unaware of the compliance date while 71% of businesses had not started the process of becoming SEPA compliant. Hard rejection of payment remittances and direct debit submissions may be the first wake-up call for many mid-market businesses across Europe. So, it’s now time for a quick reality check: what direct and indirect costs are involved and what do the domestic regulators have in store in terms of penalties or flexibility? Direct and Indirect costs of failed transactions Manual Repair is often a chargeable service that banks offer to their clients, however SEPA and the PSD prohibit much of what a Bank or PSP is allowed to “modify” in a client’s submission. Manual repair on the corporate side is the most likely scenario after a rejection; however this could be an intensive, error-prone and costly exercise. Think of the picture: duplicate rejections, fixing submission dates and manual reconciliations. The main cost here is the full time employee’s efforts… I forecast busy nights ahead for them! Interest on missed payments could result in suppliers facing disruption as delayed payments impact their working capital. Trade and Supply Chain Finance include highly time-sensitive processes such as early payment programmes, dynamic discounting, factoring and reverse factoring. Late payment penalties will be the biggest risk factor for buyers. Penalties for non-compliance to SEPA, country-by-country The European Payments Council is maintaining a summary of domestic laws and local regulator’s decisions regarding penalties, exceptions to the scheme or delayed “full compliance” for some elements until 2016. I compiled the table below based on the information available as of November 2013. Unfortunately very few countries differentiate between what is applicable to the Payments Services Providers, versus what is strictly applicable to businesses. Some of them have a clear stance on the penalties, others simply point to older domestic laws written in local language. (Please note the table below only covers countries in the Euro currency area) According to the European Payments Council, SEPA credit transfers still remain at 56.3% of total transactions, while SEPA direct debits are as low as 6.8% of total transactions (September 2013). In summary, there is an awful lot of ground to cover between now and next February if we are to avoid the disruptions and costs outlined above. (1): source: ibi research: SEPA Umsetzung in Deutschland (2): source: ISMA May 2013

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ABA Convention 2013: Banks Bounce Back and Look for Ways to Improve Customer Experience

First published on ECM Trends from the Field. The 2013 American Bankers Association (ABA) Annual Convention in New Orleans has just drawn to a close. Banks are bouncing back! Actuate Content Services Group attended the ABA Convention to greet C-Level bank executives from all over the US. We also held a Power Breakfast Session to exchange ideas on how modern banks use analytics to improve customer experience. But first let’s talk about the Convention experience and at the end – about the feedback we received from the Power Breakfast Session attendees. Most of the ABA Convention attendees were C-Level executives from small, community banks with assets of <$1B and they were mostly from the Southeast given that the venue was New Orleans this year. We talked to many banks, and received great insight into some of the things that are important to them. Dodd-Frank is in the midst of being fully implemented with tighter lending guidelines for QM or Qualified Mortgages hitting in Jan 2014, however, the head of the CFPB stated that there would be a gradual easing-in of the guidelines with little to no litigation in the first few months. The bottom line for the small banks was that if they have a traditionally good track record making loans in their markets with acceptable loss rates, this new legislation should have little or no impact. The reaction of the CEO’s ranged however from activist “we should show up with thousands to march on Washington” to more resigned “let’s not dwell on the regulation but focus on our business.” The attitudes of the CEO’s matched almost exactly the geographies from which they hail. The West Coast CEO focusing on a vibrant, young work force, the East Coast bank implementing new technology but only to the extent that it would pay off with its specific customer profile. The CEO from a deep south bank explained how his bank’s branches had been “slabbed” during Katrina, a verb meaning completely demolished save the cement slab upon which the building used to sit. But the employees were at work the next day at fold-out tables doing business, ultimately handing out up to $100M total in cash to bank customers needing money to evacuate immediately. I’m not sure what was more moving – the image of employees at those tables in front of their erstwhile branches, or the news that the bank experienced less than 1% loss from this cash handout despite the complete lack of ID validation. “How can you force someone to produce ID, when you can plainly see that they ‘swam’ out of their house this morning.” This, said the CEO, is proof positive that we are still a nation of trustworthy individuals. This particular bank has expanded rapidly since Katrina, capturing a double digit increase in market share right after the storm. How’s that for a positive customer experience? The best part of Actuate’s presentation to the ABA attendees during the Power Breakfast Session on 10/22 was not the presentation itself but the really good questions that followed. Doug Koppenhofer, Regional VP, delivered the presentation and answered the questions: Q: Is it possible to do Communication Management completely independent of Analytics? We answered that yes, one could definitely find low hanging fruit in the customer communication area especially in correspondence, without having to tie in analytics. We explained that many banks in particular are getting a better handle on the way they manage the correspondence with their clients to ensure that they leverage their brand, manage message consistency and even compliance. We mentioned the example of the bank we met at the Customer Experience Exchange who found countless examples of letters to customers stating that they “did not meet their standards.” We do believe that analytics helps you embed much more personalization and power into your messaging and that most banks will at some point couple analytics to their communication hubs. Q: Can you elaborate on what impact privacy laws might have on using publicly available social media and other content as your source for customer messaging? My only answer to that was that we are not the compliance or bank law experts. In talking with a compliance vendor later, he saw no issue with this because as individuals we opt in to disclosing all manner of personal information to Google, Facebook, etc. Bottom line: if the banks decide not to take advantage of this publicly available information, somebody else may do so instead. Q: Any ideas on how to know the identity of clicks to specific ads you would embed? That’s a darn good question, and I wonder if there is any way the e-Ad could somehow capture session information. The question was posed by an SVP of Marketing of a 20 branch bank who is doing very well with embedding ads in their real estate channel that should drive sales to their lending channel and they are getting a lot of good clicks but, how could they ever tell who it is that they need to follow up with. More to follow as we could not come up with a complete answer to this very good question. This Q & A session was first published on ECM Trends from the Field Blog by Doug Koppenhofer. You can find the Power Breakfast Session presentation here.

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EIM Success Stories: Turning Information into Innovation

A major natural gas company is experiencing a higher level of internal control over its procure-to-pay process and an 85 percent success rate for vendor compliance of invoice requirements, enabling them to comply with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. One of the largest financial services institutions in the U.K. has reduced their cash transfer time from 21 to 15 days, secured a 25% share of the ISA market, and eliminated 8 million pieces of paper for savings on associated IT and infrastructure costs. A municipality released a new website that has become the Number 1 information source for its citizens, delivering an enhanced visitor experience and giving constituents immediate access to accurate, real-time information and the services they need. A leading research institution has increased the quality and output of its research by giving students and researchers improved, remote access to modeling applications and visualizations tools with three dimensional representations of large datasets. A national newspaper is delivering rich, relevant, and contextualized content experiences on its website for improved customer satisfaction and higher revenues based on increased click-through rates. What do all these organizations have in common? They have all turned their information into innovation using Enterprise Information Management (EIM). EIM: Using Social Media to Support Multilingual Dialogue As the set of technologies and practices that maximize the value of information while minimizing its risks, EIM provides control for the information enterprise, creating the opportunity for unlimited growth and responsiveness. It builds information confidence through security, insight, governance, and agile processes from a set of comprehensive capabilities that lay clear the path to innovation and growth. As a suite, EIM assembles information flows and expands them beyond single tasks to help drive value as information moves through the enterprise. At every touch or click or process, opportunities for efficiency and innovation are created. I invite you read the next installment in my white paper series, EIM Customer Case Studies: Turning Information into Innovation. This paper paints a portrait of the information enterprise through a collection of stories about organizations that have embraced EIM to address the challenges of their information and capitalize on its potential. Read the white paper.

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How the ‘Internet of Things’ will Impact B2B and Global Supply Chains

Over the past few months CIOs and executives around the world have been trying to embrace a new set of IT related buzzwords, namely The Internet of Things (IoT), The Internet of Everything and the Industrial Internet. All three terms are essentially used to describe machine to machine (M2M) connectivity across the internet. The IoT relies on any machine or device being connected, via fixed wire or wireless communications links to the internet and then being able to transmit information in one form or another. There are countless research articles that have been published on the internet describing these three terms and I do not want to spend too much time discussing these in detail, instead I will discuss how they relate to B2B and the Supply Chain and how they are going to change the way in which companies work with each other in the future. The IoT has provided a much needed boost to the high tech and manufacturing sectors, but the technology being deployed is usable across virtually any industry sector and there lies the business opportunity. The most widely published figure estimating the market size for IoT was produced by Cisco who believes the market will be worth $14.4 trillion by 2020. Cisco has taken the lead in terms of developing thought leadership in this area, their recent Internet of Everything study provided some interested insights including the benefits chart shown below. IDC estimates an IoT market size of $9 trillion by 2020. Either of these estimates are very big numbers which is why IBM, GE, Infineon, Qualcomm and many other companies are investing significant amounts of money on IoT based technologies and services. IDC suggests there are three enablers driving the IoT, namely: On-going development of smart cities, cars and houses Enhanced connectivity infrastructure An increasingly connected culture where everyone wants to be connected to the internet at home, at work or in the car IDC goes on to predict that there will 212 billion ‘things’ connected to the internet by 2020. It is important to stress that the IoT is in its infancy but wired connected devices have been in use for many years. The idea of the IoT initially became popular through the Auto-ID Center, a non-profit collaboration of private companies and academic institutions that pioneered the development of a web-like infrastructure for tracking shipments around the world through the use of RFID tags carrying electronic product codes. The IoT relies on web-enabling virtually any type of product or piece of equipment so that data about the object can be captured and communicated. Once captured, the information would be transferred from the remote device and then processed via some form of middleware to an integration platform. Ideally from a business point of view, all connected devices would be connected to the same integration platform to allow them to work seamlessly with back office business environments such as supply chain management and ERP platforms. McKinsey & Company recently said in a report that the manufacturing sector is likely to see the most benefits from the IoT and they went on to predict that we are about to enter the fourth industrial revolution, or Industry 4.0. The industrial internet will see the world of manufacturing become more and more networked until everything is interlinked with everything else. GE sees so much potential in the industrial internet that they have setup a software division, called GE Software, based in California to look at how they can exploit this across the various products and services that they offer. McKinsey also believes that the IoT will lead to an exponential growth in data flowing across the extended enterprise and companies will have to acquire personnel with the necessary data analysis experience to be able to process this information. These people will have to design robust algorithms for processing IoT related information and then translate what happens in the physical world into a format that can be handled in the digital world. This requires mathematical, domain, market and context know-how. In the connected world, the physical world should be integrated with business processes, including delivering data, sending events and processing rules. The area of Big Data may just be starting to gain acceptance across different industry sectors, but the IoT will see interest in Big Data Analytics grow exponentially over the coming years. With a piece of integration software or middleware acting as the interface between the physical and digital supply chains, how can companies leverage this connection and more importantly how could it help to streamline supply chain processes across the extended enterprise? There are a number of ways in which the IoT could add value to supply chain strategies, not just in manufacturing, but in other sectors such as retail as well. We are at the very early stages of understanding how the IoT will impact the enterprise, but from a supply chain management point of view here are three initial areas where the IoT could impact global supply chains: Pervasive Visibility – relates to the way in which shipments are tracked at every stage of their journey from their point of manufacture to their point of delivery. The IoT not only provides ‘information everywhere’ but will offer ‘visibility everywhere’ as well. RFID is one such technology that was introduced to provide improved visibility of shipments, but has sometimes struggled to offer full end to end visibility across a supply chain due to the fact that the infrastructure to track RFID tags has not existed on a truly widespread, end to end basis. As more pieces of equipment, infrastructure and vehicles are connected to the internet, it means that traditional ‘black spots’ or visibility gaps across a supply chain where shipment visibility is limited will begin to disappear. Connected devices or infrastructure will help to plug these visibility gaps and allow shipments to be tracked end to end across a supply chain. The IoT will also allow companies to have two way communications with their shipments at each stage of its journey across the supply chain. For example a piece of equipment could be remotely contacted and instructed to go into an ‘installation mode’ before it arrives at the site where it will be delivered. Proactive Replenishment – efficient inventory management has always been a challenge across the retail industry, especially when one considers the various channels that consumers can purchase goods today. Whether buying online, or through traditional brick and mortar stores, managing inventory levels and being able to replenish stocks efficiently is a constant challenge. It is not just the retail outlets, keeping vending machines stocked up is another area that could be considerably improved. Many vending machines are typically in remote locations and the only way a company gets to monitor stock levels is to physically visit the vending machine and replenish the stock as required. What if the vending machine could be connected to the IoT and when the vending machine detects low stock for a particular item it is able to automatically place an order for new stock which can then be delivered before it runs out. What if this was expanded to normal retail outlets and low stock signals from a sensor fitted to shelving in the stores triggers the ordering of new stock. In France many supermarkets have RFID based price tags to allow pricing information to be updated centrally, extending this capability to check for stock levels will change the way in which retail outlets manage their inventory levels. Predictive Maintenance – In an earlier blog I highlighted a case for how the IoT could support the replacement of parts in serviceable products such as industrial equipment and office equipment for example. If a piece of equipment is able to self-diagnose a potential problem and then place an order for a replacement part, then it can be fitted before the part fails. I used an example of a car engine detecting reduced flow rates across a water pump. A seal on the water pump could be leaking, causing inefficient operation of the cooling system. Before the water pump completely fails, the car’s ECU sends information via the internet to a local service centre about a potential problem and at the same time places an order for a new seal to be delivered directly to the car owner’s normal location where they get their vehicle serviced. The service centre then automatically checks the service schedule and emails the owner of the car to notify them of an impending issue with their car. This scenario could be applied to an aircraft, a piece of construction equipment or even a fax machine in an office, any serviceable equipment will be connected to the IoT to help detect potential problems and get them resolved ASAP. Direct integration with a B2B platform allows all ordering and shipment related documents to be created and tracked automatically so that service centres know exactly when the replacement parts will be delivered. Key to all three of these areas is the ability to integrate the physical and digital supply chains. Companies will need access to a cloud based integration platform that can integrate to a wide variety of connected devices, equipment and services. An M2M API or middleware that sits between the piece of equipment and the supply chain management environment will be key to providing the link between physical and digital supply chains. Therefore common standards will have to be developed to achieve this seamlessly and IBM has started the ball rolling by proposing their MQTT standard as the basis of how machines will communicate with each other across the internet. But this is only one part of the equation, as document/file standards and ways to process the information being transmitted between these devices must also be developed. The key challenge to widespread adoption of the IoT relates to achieving seamless interoperability and common standards that need to be developed to allow machines to be able to communicate at a technical level and across different borders and cultures as well. In North America an alliance of ten companies including Cisco and GE are working to lobby the US government on the importance of developing open standards that will encourage broad adoption of the IoT. The alliance is aiming to address the following IoT related issues: Co-engineering cyber and physical systems Identifying cyber-security issues and solutions Addressing concerns about interoperability Identifying ways to maintain robust wireless connections Setting standards for real-time data collection and analytics It is not just in North America where IoT related standards are being discussed. The European Research Cluster on the Internet of Things has undertaken some interesting research over the past couple of years, one of the more interesting reports tried to define all the areas that had to be addressed to develop an IoT related platform. In China the government sees the IoT as being able to offer a key competitive advantage in the global economy. So as not to miss out on the next big internet revolution they have instructed numerous government departments to come up with policies for how the IoT can be deployed across China. Pervasive, Proactive and Preventative, three words that begin to define the benefits of the IoT, especially from a supply chain perspective. The IoT will allow the seamless exchange of information in real time between a shipment, its surroundings and a common, cloud based, integration platform that is used to connect all trading partners across the extended enterprise. I have not had time to discuss other areas such as Smart Grids and how for example the IoT will impact the Electric Vehicle industry, I will expand on these in future blogs. I am fortunate to be attending the Internet of Things World Forum in Barcelona in two weeks’ time and I will provide an update on the latest IoT related trends when I get back from this conference. In the meantime have you given any thought as to how your business could benefit or embrace the IoT?

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Data Center for EasyLink Fax Services Recieves PCI-DSS Certification

OpenText has received compliancecertification at our Ashburn, VA data center with the Payment CardIndustry (PCI) Data Security Standard (DSS). This certification by anindependent auditor confirms the care we take to protect customer data –specifically it ensures our processes around transmitting faxes withcredit card data in them are complaint with the PCI-DSS standardsrequiring that payment card data be kept private.. Many times neither organizations, nor their customers, realize thatfaxes contain payment card information. In true credit card fashion itwould benefit them to “read the fine print” and understand that if abreach occurred they’d experience significant losses – including damagedbrand reputation, loss of sales, and payment card issuer fines of$5,000 to $100,000. Even if organizations are suspected of a breach, thePCI-DSS folks can levy additional “fees” in the form of forensicexaminers rigorously inspecting everyone involved, including theircustomers and vendors. OpenText’s compliance with PCI-DSS certifies our ability to protect against the risks above by offering: encrypted transmission security encryption of data at rest immediate fax document deletion no archiving of fax data controls preventing OpenText personnel from accessing customer fax data Ultimately, more than anything else, meeting this standard furthersour pledge to continue implementing the policies, procedures andtechnology necessary to keep our customers’ fax data protected and ourtransmission network secure.

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Ignoring Privacy Compliance can Trigger a Public Problem

The paperless office inches closer every day. Nosurprise there. It has long been heralded as the promised land oforganizational operations for its efficiencies, cost savings andproductivity increases for both public and private entities. Andever-improving technologies such as the OpenText ECM platform have made the collection, management, and application of digital data effortless. That’s all well and good, but what fascinates me is how the digital information landscape offers intriguing data sharing possibilities. And that, of course, opens the door to a host of operational and compliance quandaries in the process. Let’s dig in. Here’sa theoretical example: National government agency “A” makes theinvestment and converts a previously physical data collection process todigital. It works great, reams of paper disappear along with the laborrequired to manage it all. Records are instantly retrievable by agencystaff and can be trusted for accuracy and timeliness. The world is awonderful place. However, with all thisconstituent-related content now condensed down to an electronic stream,opportunities for information sharing are hard to ignore: Theconstituents themselves have long complained that they have poor accessto information collected by the agency. Hmmm, a simple query-driveninternet portal wouldn’t hurt, would it? Otherfederal government departments, both within this agency and others,could certainly benefit from seeing this data. Why not develop a simplereporting function that draws from the database and allows them togenerate a more complete constituent profile? Similargovernment bodies from regional, municipal and even foreignjurisdictions would find value in the data. No harm in taking requeststo pass on data sets, is there? Thesame scenario can also be applied to the private sector, as well. Justsubstitute a multi-national financial institution and its relatedcontemporaries into the equation above. The intentions driving thesehypothetical situations‑everything from increasing case-management efficiency to furthering public relations to improving decision-making accuracy‑maybe admirable, but there are a number of data management factors thatmust be considered and implemented first. Together, they form elementsof a comprehensive information governance program that will reduce risk, improve effectiveness, and instill institutional confidence in the whole process. Legacy SystemsFormany organizations, years of mergers, acquisitions and siloeddevelopment have resulted in a convoluted web of marginallyinterconnected data collection tools and repositories. The good news isthat a best-in-class ECM solution can be configured to work within this environment, but job #1 requires stakeholders to get a handle on what’s where and why. Data Classification and RetentionWhichinformation to keep? Where? For how long? And then what? With theamount of information flowing into and out of organizations growing atexponential rates, simply defaulting to archiving it all forever is nolonger an option. Incorporating the best practices of records managementis a great place to start, allowing organizations to clearly classifyall forms of structured and unstructured information and definecollection, access, archiving, and disposition parameters. Privacy ComplianceThisis the big one. Every organization is subject to corporate, industryand government regulations defining in the simplest terms who can accesswhich pieces of accumulated information and what they can use it for.Attaining compliance may involve addressing everything from geographicalstorage locations to security framework to auditable data trails. Form aworking committee, incorporate an appropriate privacy policy, andsource an optimal content management solution. Your brand credibility,operational efficiency, and legal fees depend on it. Withouta comprehensive information governance policy encompassing the pointsabove, there’s a very real possibility that instituting any level ofinformation sharing will have serious operational, legal, or integrityrepercussions. Non-compliant data sharing and privacy practices are oneof the few areas where there is virtually no margin for error in the public’s eyes. Fortunately, introducing a solution is not as overwhelming as you may think. Believeme, as part of the ECM team here at OpenText, we’ve more than likelydesigned, developed, and implemented a program very similar to one thatwill work for you. The exact level of secure, defensible compliance andtransparency you need is attainable. And it begins with educatingyourself. Start with an information governance whitepaper, case study, or eBook and then let’s talk.

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