Customer Experience Management

Everything You Wanted to Know about ECM at Enterprise World

This year’s OpenText Enterprise World conference is better than ever! I am looking forward to a great week ofcollaborating with customers and partners in Orlando. There is somuch going on that I wanted to highlight some of the ECM focused partsoftheevent. Training Sessions:Sunday through Tuesday offers over 30 ECM related training courses. Youcan sign up to learn more about key areas of the portfolio includingadministration, upgrading, records management, developing extensionswith WebReports and ActiveView, and more. Whatever your role or thestate of your ECM implementation, there are training sessions for you.Check out the schedule and register for session Partner Summit: Monday and Tuesday are partner days with keynotes from our executives and partner leadership team. Theykeynotes will be followed by ECM and Discovery breakout sessions thatwill zero in on the topics you have requested. ECM and Discoverystrategy and products, sales tips and resources will be the focus. We’relooking forward to discussions with individual partners on theirspecific issues and requests. Techie Tuesday: We’ve listened to your input! This day has been added to specifically address your requests for more in-depth technical sessions on key topics. These are 90-minute technical deep dives on key topicsthat will help both customers and partners enhance their current andfuture ECM implementations. Topics include: new ways to integrate withECM APIs and UI Widgets, Customizing ECM with WebReports and ActiveView,and advice on scaling and deploying large ECM projects in the cloud oron premise. There are also topics listedin other areas that could be of interest to ECM technical peopleincluding Discovery–Content Migration 101 and Building applications withInfoFusion, in addition to the AppWorks sessions. All these sessionsprovide a great opportunity for both customers and partners to learn andconnect with OpenText product team experts. Enterprise World Keynotes: Wednesday and Thursday morning will provide a set of entertaining and informative keynote presentations from Mark Barrenchea, Muhi Mahzoub, Kevin Cochrane, partners, customers and our very special guest speaker, William Shatner. They’ll be discussing the latest innovations…plus a whole lot more. I can’t give too much away, but I can tell you, you won’t want to miss these sessions! The ECM Track keynote promises to be exciting, educational, and enlightening. John Mancini, President of AIIM, will speak about Information Governance and why it’s imperative that you act now. Nic Carter, lead Product Manager for ECM, will detail key innovations within the ECM portfolio, and we will be joined by a customer and partner who will share their business challenges and how they addressed Information Governance with ECM. This keynote will set you up for the remainder of the sessions within the event, both from a business and technical viewpoint. ECM Breakouts: There are many ECM sessions on Wednesday afternoon in the ECM and Discovery tracks. ECM will also be highlighted and integrated within the IX, BPMand CEM tracks. Our most popular sessions are back Content Server, RM,Email Management, Workflow and Enterprise Connect. In addition, thereare panel sessions where customers share their insights and breakoutsthat help with building applications, integrating with ERP systems, andimplementing in the cloud. I strongly recommend you check out thebreakouts in all the tracks as you will find sessions that will help with both your ECM and Information Governance goals.Tech Talks:Do you want to spend time with our product experts, ask questions aboutyour implementation, and share feedback directly with them? These set of sessions are held in a less formal environment and are designed to let you dojust that. The Enterprise Connect team will be there, as well as theWebReports/ActiveView team, OTDS, Search, Security Clearance, Archive,and Content Server upgrade and deployment specialists. Innovation Sessions: If you are looking to discuss broader issues with your peers, you will love this track. These sessions take innovative approaches to understanding and brainstorming on business issues around the Information Enterprise. There are always surprises and great discussions in these sessions. Industry Breakouts: Thursday we focus on industry specific solutions and implementations.There are quite a few sessions that cover ECM implementations andproducts. Hear from customers and product teams about innovations andimplementations in Public Sector, Energy, Finance, Life Sciences andMedia/Entertainment. These breakouts are a great place to meet with andhear from your industry peers and share best practices. Expo: In the Expo area there will be pods staffed by product experts where you can see demos and ask specific questions. There will be an ECM lab where you can see an integrated demonstration featuring a number of new innovations. In addition, there are some fun games such as the WebReports and ActiveView team contest. If you are not in a session, the Expo is the place to be to get quality time with the product experts! Innovation Lab: Do you want to get hands on with innovations that aren’t yet released and be part of shaping their direction? Sign up early for a time at the Innovation Lab to spend time in the design process for planned innovations. We need your feedbackandyou’ll have some fun with it. Networking and meetings:This is some of the best time at Enterprise World. It’s your chance tomeet with the OpenText team, your peers and other similar organizations.Take advantage of every opportunity to meet with us. Whether you are acustomer, prospective customer, or partner, we look forward to thechance to meet with you at this event. We learn from every meeting andthis helps us to better understand your business. It’s going to be an educational, informative and fun week at Enterprise World this year. I can’t wait to see you there! Not registered yet? You don’t want to miss this event. Register now.

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This is a CMSWire cross-post. Duringa recent conversation with colleagues from the Financial Servicessector, one person challenged: “Is there really anything new andinnovative for banking technology, or have we already seen it all?” Thelively discussion led to a far more interesting and important question: “Where are banks finding the inspiration and tools to drive customer-focused innovation?” Hereare my thoughts on Financial Service Industry (FSI) innovation and howbankers are increasingly taking cues from consumer tech and smartretailers as they practice the art of banking. I see opportunity forbankers to capitalize on changing consumer views of risk and whatconstitutes a good customer experience. What’s New in Bank Technology?I’mhearing a lot lately about exciting new technologies driving innovationin banking. There are conferences dedicated to the topic, analystreports and whitepapers being published, webinar series and more. If youGoogle “technology innovation in the financial services industry,” youget more than 200 million results. A sampling of intriguing hits includes mobile technology that reportedly can save the banking industry US$ 1.5 billion annually, Digital Shadows footprint based cyber-attack protection technology, Virtual Piggy that can support gaming and other social micro-transactions, and my favorites (because they both include awesome dogs) are Simple.com with a cool and intuitive way to save and pay and FloatMoney that helps build interest free credit by shopping (okay, the shopping part is good too). I could go on and on with this list, but as readers of my CMSWire article seriesknow, I really do prefer to start with the customer motivation and letthe technology discussion drive from there. While it’s important toconsider new external technology forces impacting a market, I like tothink first about the desired customer impact, not the technology. Sowhat are banker customer concerns that present opportunities fortechnology response these days? Here’s my take on what a banker “bucketlist” might include: Deal with the loss of customer confidence that came with economic market upheaval Capture and retain clients who have changing attitudes and expectations for online and omni-channel communication Satisfy customers who come armed with their own new technology like mobile, BYOD and social apps Read on for some artful approaches banks are taking to “check off” the list. Banks are reimagining how to create and sustain customer relationshipsInorder to drive customer-focused innovation, banks are reimagining howto create effective customer relationships in today’s environment. Forthe mega banks, and the banks who inherited customer accounts from themduring the market turmoil, dealing with customer confidence meansrestoring positive experiences. These experiences in the past wereoften represented by personal relationships and interactions with keybank branch personnel. Now, innovative technology, much of it inspiredby consumer and retail examples, can be used to achieve theseobjectives. For example, case management technology is a perfect approach to preserve the personal servicethat attracted many bank customers in the first place and at the sametime bring down cost to serve. What was perhaps once performed by arepresentative with a personal relationship with the customer can now beassisted with case management apps that bridge channel, information andprocess gaps. With this assist applied to account opening andcustomer onboarding, it becomes possible to “know your customer” notonly for compliance but also to intelligently suggest appropriatelytargeted product options, much like consumer retailers do. This alsoreduces the transaction costs involved and saves the lost opportunitycost. Case management also enables knowledge workers to innovate, that is, to perform work in their own unique ways to best respond tomanaging error exceptions as well as unusual circumstances. This is oneof the distinctive elements of this technology — the concept that theprocess participants are at times involved in defining specific actionsfor a case and at other times involved in responding to actions taken ina case. Rather than modeling the entire business process ahead oftime, you have an environment that supports access to information andprogression through tasks as needed to achieve the goal. While this isnot the same as the unique personal interactions that banks once hadwith their customers, it does enable more personalized and personalservice to occur. The added advantage is that these interactions are nowless costly and more streamlined because they are no longer bogged downin a paper chase or manual efforts. Thus fees and rates can be morecompetitive without sacrificing profitability. Banks are creating value through online experienceChangingcustomer expectations for online banking require that customerexperience needs to be consistent and coordinated across channels andyet adapted to specific channel characteristics. It also means thatinternal processes and interactions must be enabled to support this newomni-channel world. One of the most impressive examples I am familiar with is Wells Fargowho has 275,000 team members using the latest in Web ExperienceManagement (WEM) technology with responsive design, enabling theenterprise to be agile and adaptive to the consumer at the moment theywant to engage. This is all about increased productivity and access toinformation that in turn improves the end customer experience. Anothercool example is what mBank is doing with Accenture. mBank is a Polishdirect bank that originally launched as a greenfield venture. mBank is trying something new that has foundations in gamification and clever deal offers that mimic the best of Groupon and Pinterest. “Bymaking the site, for lack of a better word, fun, mBank has changed therelationship between bank and customer. This is important in almost anyB2C environment and more important when the traditionalcustomer/business relationship in banking has always been vaguelyadversarial.” Banks are combining technology in new ways around the customer experienceBankshave always been concerned with how to satisfy their different customerdemographic segments. Today’s changing customer demographics meanincreased challenges to ensure a satisfying experience, and I’m seeingsome interesting responses. Social and mobile dynamics figure prominently in this. A recent CEB TowerGroup studyfound that 42% percent of banking executive respondents now believethat a key value driver of social technology is competitive advantageover others in their industry, while 25% of respondents also thinksocial offers important functionality. Further, 65% rank socialnetworking as a top technology for near-term investment, while 56% rankmobile banking as a key technology for investment. One of my favorite examples has banks innovating by combining new technology with existing technology; ATMs with human teller video chat. NBC news recently highlighted Interactive Teller technology from NCR that is being used to remotely control the ATM and all of its functions. What’sinteresting is that the machine can work like any other ATM unless thecustomer pushes a button to request a human teller. The customer can useall the self-serve menus as normal, but they have the option to callthe teller if needed. According to the NBC report, analysts believe it’scritical that customers decide when they want to do a totallyself-service transaction and when they want some help. Banks are also experimenting with integrating social and mobile applicationsand smartphones into the ATM experience. With this, a customerapproaches an ATM and launches the application. After the app loads, thecustomer enters the four digit PIN number tied to their bank account onthe smartphone touchscreen. Then once the pin is accepted, the appbrings up all bank accounts related to the customer’s account andtransactions can proceed. Which came first, the customer or the technology?It’sclear that banks are doing some interesting and artful things withtechnology these days, and to my mind the truly important “bucket list” innovations are focused around the customer and their experience. Early in my career there was a time when I worked closely with the GE Research & Development Centeraround new and exciting distributed data processing technologies forbanking and commercial industrial use. I was very proud of the work, butwhen friends would ask what I did at GE, I always said, “I do thequality check to make sure light bulbs really turn off when you closethe refrigerator door.” (Okay it seemed funnier back then.) My friendswould smile and change the subject, commenting that I must be doingbleeding edge innovative research that required secrecy. The truthwas I didn’t think my work would make any sense or be very interestingto them. In retrospect, I should have shared more; not about thetechnology itself, but about the intended applications and benefits formy business customers and their data-dependent consumers. Fastforward to today and I am much more likely to talk about what I do, butalways in the context of what I think it means to my customers. Sure Ido get the occasional blank stare and at times responses like, “Blah bahblah, that’s so boring…” but I also often hear, “That’s so cool andtell me more.” Of course maybe my circle of friends has changed.

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Future of Social Business is Paved with (Good) Intentions

This is a CMSWire cross-post. Social Business is an IntentionThere’sEnterprise 1.0 over there, and Enterprise 2.0 over there, and we’re allsomewhere between the two and some part of that is Social. Embarking onthe journey from here to there is to form an intention. This intentioncan be about the way we want to engage customers. It can be an intentionof creating a richly connected workforce so as to reap the rewards ofagility, resilience, problem solving and innovation that such aworkforce is capable of. It is about realizing that the power ofcommand and control is great, but limited, and we have reached thatlimit. It is about realizing that the capabilities, ambitions, insightsand preferences of people that have been largely ignored in the 20thcentury will not be ignored in the 21st, in part because technology hasredistributed a little power from corporations to consumers and theworkforce, and in part because you cannot command and control your waythrough the pace and complexity of 21st century business and society,and, to quote a beloved fictional character, “the only way out isthrough” (bonus marks if you leave a comment with his name). Intentions are different from goals or missionsJony Ives narrates this lovely little videoabout why the next iOS will be flat, not bubbly. This is not simply amatter of taste and sophistication. It is a matter of intention. Inthe video he says “Design defines so much of our experience. There is aprofound and enduring beauty in simplicity and clarity and efficiency …its about bringing order to complexity.” What Jony is saying, is thatthey did not set out to “change” the UI. They set out to bring order tocomplexity, while honoring simplicity. The difference between goal andintention is subtle but important. Intention is a permanent state ofseeking, it is never achieved, but always honored. A goal says — Iwant a new UI, or I want to solve a problem, or I want something thatwill make it clear that this iOS is really different an innovative. Agoal has an end state. Goals are good, but they are not intentions, and, unlike Social Business, they can be achieved. Intention says — Ido not know what my journey is going to look like, but I have certainqualities and ideals in mind. Intention puts your focus on the outcome,not the method, or really the goal. Do you play tennis? If youremember learning to play, then you know that if you try to hit the ball—connect the racquet with the ball — you whiff, but if you put a laserfocus on the ball and you swing your arm, somehow that ball gets hit.This is the power of intention. It lets the right things happen withoutexamining them overly. (It’s an act of faith that is reinforced by thedelight in seeing the shock in your husband’s eyes as his ball comesback to him with equal power. But I digress.) Actually this themeof faith comes back again and again when we’re talking about complexity, emergence and social. That is because we can’t explain it — at leastnot in rational, reductionist, cause and effect terms. We can only knowit. This is an excruciating state of being for biz and science types,but is a leap that must be leapt. This is both why we crave and why wecan’t have the ROI calculations we seek. We can only look forcorrelations between social-ness and top line performance. We can’t findcause and effect. We are epidemiologists, not chemists. (Ok, really,now I’m done with this. For now.) Intention means that every stepis both unrestricted but well informed by the truths you can find — thatgood products are better than bad products. That good products are theresult of knowing customer needs and applying talent against them. Thatrespecting the voice and convenience of the customer is a goodinvestment. That there is no executive in your organization that is onefraction as smart as the rest of the org combined. Perhaps my favorite exposition of intention is an old ad about a faucet. Yes, Kohler did a double bluff on the theme on pretentious design aficionadoswho come to a pretentious architect and say “design a house aroundthis” — evoking the idea that they so admire the tacit design principlesin the faucet that they want a house that embodies those same qualities— some of which are nearly impossible to articulate. So they can’t begoals. They are intentions. Intention is a very long view approached by a series of very short stepsIfyour intention is to be a social business, and you have a vague notion —and it can only be vague — that a social business will be moreprofitable, more resilient, more interesting — over the next 50 years,and that your customers will love you better, and your employees willlove you better and magical emergent innovation will fall from the sky,and you will, finally, get Lew Platt’s wish of knowing what we know — orat least being able to benefit from what we know, even if we neveractually know it. If you’re lucky, you were “born social” Wehave been through frameworks, processes and models. We have beenthrough half a dozen years of theories, pontificating, genius andfoolishness. We have platitudes, and attitudes, (both entirelyskippable. 140 char has its dark side). Many of them have merit andapplication in certain circumstances, but as a whole they build aholistic and visceral understanding of the intention, if not thedefinition of Social Business. We have learned a few tangible-ishthings, however. The first is that while some companies are bornsocial, it is very hard to become social — but it does happen over time. We see this in narrative-lead consumer companies, like Nike and Levi’s, and in (some) places where knowledge and collaboration are fundamental(but not Law. Social and seven-minute accounting don’t seem to mesh). Theway they get there is by taking a zillion little steps towardsomething. The something they are moving toward is a little hard toexplain. They hire the right people. They make decisions in slightlydifferent ways. They try stuff knowing that whether it works or not, ithas taught them something, in some form of David Snowden’s multiple parallel safe to fail experiments. Manysuccessful CEOs declare that they believe social is a better way to dobusiness, and they summon the courage to go there and figure it out ontheir way. Some businesses — like John Stepper’s Deutche Bank — findpockets of value in social technology, that enable certain departmentsto thrive, without necessarily becoming a social business, at least notyet. IBM has been on its journey longer and larger, and it may have moremomentum than many. How do businesses become social, really? In 2001, Jim Collins wrote in his book “Good to Great”that good businesses do not make the leap to great all of the sudden.It is not a strategy or a project or an investment or an initiative thatdoes it, but rather an aggregation of steps in the right direction. Hemakes this analogy, and, in truth it’s the main thing that really stuckwith me from the book: Picture a huge, heavy flywheel. It’s amassive, metal disk mounted horizontally on an axle. It’s about 100 feetin diameter, 10 feet thick, and it weighs about 25 tons. That flywheelis your company. Your job is to get that flywheel to move as fast aspossible, because momentum — mass times velocity — is what will generatesuperior economic results over time. Right now, the flywheel isat a standstill. To get it moving, you make a tremendous effort. Youpush with all your might, and finally you get the flywheel to inchforward. After two or three days of sustained effort, you get theflywheel to complete one entire turn. You keep pushing, and the flywheelbegins to move a bit faster. It takes a lot of work, but at last theflywheel makes a second rotation. You keep pushing steadily. It makesthree turns, four turns, five, six. With each turn, it moves faster, andthen — at some point, you can’’t say exactly when — you break through.The momentum of the heavy wheel kicks in your favor. It spins faster andfaster, with its own weight propelling it. You aren’t pushing anyharder, but the flywheel is accelerating, its momentum building, itsspeed increasing.My point here should be clear — a social businessis one that has set a social intention and takes many, many steps,which, when properly aligned and examined, lead inexorably to a “SocialBusiness” that is able to enjoy a more humanistic, sustainable,profitable, innovative, emergent form of business. On the one hand this is simple aggregation of effort. Every positive step is amplified by the next one.Buton the other hand, with another invaluable William Gibson quote — thefuture is here it’s just not evenly distributed — is WHY this works. Tounderstand this, you must realize that there is not ONE future that ishere, but an infinity of them. Each step opens up a new possible futureif it works, if it takes, and sets off a chain of events that leadsomewhere. Our goal is to make as many “intentional” possible futures aswe can. We cannot know in advance which of them will take root and takeover, but we can ensure that they are imbued with desirable qualities,that they are taken with the right intentions. A don’t be evil type ofintention (that is reexamined often.). The Best argument yet for Social/2.0 connected businessSocial Business = Intention = Seeking = Networking = Innovation Ifyou are still casting about for reasons as to why connected companiesare more valuable than unconnected companies, you need to watch RicardoHausman’s lecture on person-bytes, which he applies to countries, butyou will be wise to think of in terms of enterprises. And you willquickly realize that 1.0 leadership is leaving too much opportunity onthe table because the number of person-bytes — the breadth andcomplexity of capability the enterprise can address — accessible by 1.0Enterprise is far less than what Enterprise 2.0 can leverage. Letme say that again, because I think its pretty big and you might havemissed it. Enterprise 1.0, with command and control, is limited in itscapability by the intelligence and capability of the Executive team. Theexecutive team has most of the accessible person bytes in the company —though they can use others in simplistic ways. In 1.0 enterprises, theworkforce is there to amplify the capabilities of the executives. Lookedat another way, Executives are the constraint. After a certain point,it is the executives that restrain growth and capability because theorganization cannot amplify what the executive can’t see. InEnterprise 2.0 power and capability flows the other way — from thenetwork to the leadership. In Enterprise 2.0, executives (leaders)inquire and align collective intelligence and capability. They canaccess the collective capabilities, resources and observations of theworkforce and beyond. They can build businesses with greater person-bytepotential. Hausmann showsthat not only are those products that require more person-bytes morerare and valuable, but they lead to richer adjacent opportunities.Person-bytes aggregate via proximity and connection. You don’t have onekind of expertise — say in manufacturing phones — and then suddenly havea totally different kind of expertise in oil exploration — unlessyou’ve discovered some link between the too. Social, networkedcompanies can build more complex — more person-byte — products, and growexpertise and advantage more reliably than those that can’t. Hausmann’sdata is based on national economies, but if you look at it theconnection will be instantly clear. The Road to Social Business is Paved with Intentions. Make them good.We are all somewhere between the two — between a 1.0 business over there — and a 2.0 business over there. Justremember this. A framework is an invitation to think, not an excuse notto. It’s a way to organize your thoughts. None of us will travelexactly the same path to a new business paradigm, in the same way thatnone of us have traveled the same path to profitability and success.There is no path, there is only intention. In a world where notions ofbusiness, privacy, identity, civil rights, labor, morality, war andpeace are all disrupted, let us please make them good intentions. The best is yet to come.

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Mobile is Over, Pervasive is Here. What About Privacy?

This is a CMSWire cross-post. Youmay have already noticed that the mobility issue is over and done. Infact, mobile, social, wearable and the internet of things haveconverged. What remains is to understand what it all means — what justhappened to us? I was sitting in Starbucks a few months ago withmy 8-year old daughter playing 20 questions. She chose an oddly specificcreature, a black and white warbler, but she had a spotty knowledge ofits habits. Turns out she was doing a little research project on thebird. She knew its song and its size, but not its habitat. So with myiPhone and Starbucks’ free WiFi, we Googled the bird, and were able tofind facts, images and even hear its song. Mobile can be beautiful. Super Powers and Artificial SensesYouriPhone, or Android, or whatever, may be in your hand more than your carkeys, your silverware and your loved ones combined. It gives yousuperpowers. You have in your hand a super-human sense of everythingfrom location and speed to radiation, food freshness, proximity, bloodpressure and much more. It also gives you constant access to our“continually improving, communal, prosthetic memory” (thank you,Gibson), known as the internet (I have always found the capitalizationof internet disturbing. Don’t do it. Just live with the greenunderlining). Your phone also gives you, should you choose toaccept it, a constant awareness of the world around you — whether it’stelling us about the latest sports hero or dictatorship to go down,Bezos buying the Washington Post, or the earthquake you’re about to berattled by. We have constant contact with our kith and kin. It gives youprotection in uncertain circumstances and aid in emergencies. It givesyou freedom. Certainly it gives my kids theirs — I’d never let them roamuntethered. We have seen phones, connected to social networks,catalyze the fall of tyrannical regimes, and coordinate aid indisasters. We’ve seen them both record and create historic events. Themedium is indeed the message. [McLuhan understood so very deeply, soearly. Of course he was also witnessing a social revolution. The 1960sand 70s reexamination of social mores hardly compares with therevolution we are seeing today, but today’s social refactoring will playout over a longer time horizon. Maybe.] A Third Way – Neither Animate nor InanimateThere is no longer a simple dichotomy between animate and inanimate objects. Thereis a new class of objects. I’ll call them signalers. They are objectsthat send signals. These include your phone of course, along with manyother things. Soon to be a nearly infinite number of things. Yourthermostat, for example, always was a sensor. It sensed temperature, andturned your furnace on or off accordingly. Your Nest, however, doesmore. It monitors and adjusts, but also attempts to record patterns andadjust according to those patterns, which is interesting, but still notthe point. The point is that Nest knows when you are likely to be homeand your temperature preferences and it is iPhone app controllable,which means that data is stored in someone’s cloud. Not your cloud. Thisis true also of your GPS. Your box of cornflakes is not asignaler, but a signal. When you buy your cereal, it is scanned. Theprice is displayed and added to your grocery bill. It is also loggedwith the grocery store inventory processes, and their marketingdatabase. Because the supermarkets now give very large discountsfor joining their clubs, along with gas discounts and others — few of usare radical enough to resist joining. Not to mention the fact that thissame information is also registered with your financial institutionbecause you probably paid with another signaler — a bank card or creditcard. This began decades ago, but back then they were collecting datawith little ability to do much with it. Well big data has come a ratherlong way — and now Target can detect your unwed teenage daughter’s pregnancy before you can. Now Objects can See You BackWe are used to being anonymous in an inanimate world. No longer. Yourobjects are pumping you information at the same time they are pumpingit back to some central location. Who’s watching and why? The governmentis watching some of it, and you can be certain that the company whosells or services your object/service is also watching — probably tomaximize their profits, and sometimes to also maximize your enjoyment.Apple wants to know what you listen to so that they can sell you more.Target and Safeway want your information so that they can sell you more. The government wants your information to track down bad guys, orpossibly for other reasons such as public health or protection of civilrights (rather than, we hope, the suppression of them). In 1995 Iwas working for a now-defunct startup where I played with complexitytheory. FedEx hired us to do a tiny project for them. They wereexploring smart packaging. If packages were imbued with certain kinds ofintelligence, would they be able to smartly route themselves along themost efficient route? Routing millions of packages globally throughoutthe world is a very hard problem. Optimizing the routes is extremelydifficult — especially when you need to deal with things like schedulingchanges, weather events, natural disasters and so forth. So FedEx wasexploring the notion that the best possible solution to routeoptimization is to allow the packages themselves to detect and connectto their local environment and make their own routing decisions locally. Mysimulation, of course, showed packages routing themselves around theworld very efficiently, gracefully rerouting themselves around obstaclesand dramatically reducing overall transit time for the system comparedwith the traditional centralized, predetermined routing system. Thosepackages were not exactly inanimate. They were smarter than your box ofcornflakes. They were like robots in that they could detect and react,and they can phone home. For now, FedEx puts barcodes on every package. They are — like your box of cornflakes — just signals (for now). The Pervasive Internet of Things. Privacy, Prism and a Very Big QuestionButjust like in the grocery store, the benefits have a quid pro quo — theGPS means I’m rarely lost anymore, but it also means that someone canknow where I am — at all times. So does the phone company, and possiblythe NSA. So we have a new, urgent and mind-blowing privacy debate to have. Here’sthe truth. If you are storing information anywhere but within theconfines of your house, you can be certain that someone other thanyourself can see it. This means your cable box, your social mediaaccounts, your Nest thermostat, your phone are conduits for others tosee the most intimate details of your life. Have we technologiedourselves out of privacy? Is the only truly private person acash-wielding, non-cellphone, no-club card, AAA map-folder? Ananachronism? Turning on your car or your kitchen lights with your iPhoneis very cool, extremely convenient, but also logged in someone’sdatabase. Is there a right to privacy? If so, are privatecompanies restricted in the same way as governments? The bill of rights, read a certain way, is a list of curbs on governmental powers, but theyalso dictate the rules of society and commerce. Should there bewarnings on your credit card and GPS that explicitly say what data iscollected and to what purpose? Should this sort of thing be allowed atall? If it is unacceptable for our government to monitor ourcommunications and movements and finances for the purposes of nationalsecurity, is it tolerable for AT&T and Wells Fargo to do the samefor purposes of revenue? The right to privacy is not listed in theU.S. constitution. It was brought into the public debate in the Roe vWade decision in 1973. We have many rights that come at a very highcost. Free speech for example. Miranda. We have anti-slavery laws(including, most importantly, modern minimum wage and worker safetylaws). I came across this legal brief by two Supreme Court judges: “Recentinventions and business methods call attention to the next step whichmust be taken for the protection of the person, and for securing to theindividual what Judge Cooley calls the right ‘to be let alone.'[10] Instantaneous photographs and newspaper enterprise have invadedthe sacred precincts of private and domestic life; and numerousmechanical devices threaten to make good the prediction that ‘what iswhispered in the closet shall be proclaimed from the house-tops.'” Would you be surprised to learn that this was written in 1890 by Judges Warren and Brandeis? Publicdata can aid in public health, democracy, safety and our understandingand access to the world. Jennifer Pahlka gave a talk that showed how public data is, in fact, the basis of American Democracy, and that it is essential that we grow and protect its integrity. It canbring critical resources to those in need. It might build a more justand civil society. It might also shift power — that is to sayinformation and knowledge — into another resource like money, thatgovernments and phone companies have in abundance, and citizens havelittle, and little hope of achieving. We’re going to have todecide how we want this to go, and start experimenting with the rulesand regulations we’ll need to get us there. Where will we compromise? And so we get back to intention. Is society’s intention to maximize profit or to maximize prosperity —life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness? What unimagined extensionsto human capability and prosperity will pervasive computing bring us? Inwhat ways will it refactor our expectations of society and our rolewithin it as individuals? The best is yet to come.

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We Love IT!

“Ilove these guys because they really care. Their dedication to the 4C’s–Capability, Commitment, Chemistry, Customers–amazes me every day.I’m so proud to be associated with them.” – Pat Harper, CIO, OpenText We Love IT! You know it. Weknow it. In the corporate world, IT simply hasn’t gotten the love itdeserves. Too often, they’re treated as a support service, excluded fromstrategic discussions, and tasked with the impossible. That’s all aboutto change, though. The emergence of the Information Enterpriseis gathering momentum. New relationships and collaborative models areneeded to manage, understand and extract value from the massive volumesof information organizations are accumulating. And a healthy, reciprocalpartnership with IT will be an integral element in it all. That’s the focus of this year’s Enterprise Worldconference: OpenText is bringing business and IT together to explorethe incredible possibilities of this new paradigm, help establish theworking relationships, and forge a holistic path to success througheffective information management. Here’s Your Chance to Share Some IT Love Yes,the tech nerds are about to become everyone’s best friend, and we hereat OpenText couldn’t be happier. After all, we were founded by techgeniuses and, to this day, remain immensely proud of our relationshipswith the IT infrastructure at every one of our customers around theworld. To kick-off this impending step-change in corporate dynamics, wethought we’d have a little fun by shining a well-deserved spotlight onthe unsung heroes that make up IT departments. It’s a contestwe’re calling “We Love IT!” and it’s your chance to share how great yourIT team is. Simply gather your team (or as many members as you can),take a picture, add a sentence or two telling us why they’re so great,and tweet it including the hashtags #WeLoveIT and #OTEW2013 by September27. We’ll get the ball rolling with a photo of our very favoriteIT team (ours!) and some kind words from OpenText CIO Pat Harper(above). Over the next few weeks, we’ll compile all of the submissions on our Facebook page and randomly draw one winner. The prize? Five free passes for your IT team to experience the new world of thinking at Enterprise World 2013. Complete rules can be found here.

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Supply Chain Symphony: Three Trends, One Prediction

This is a CMSWire cross-post. Eachyear at this time, supply chain geeks (and I use this term with greatregard and affection) eagerly await publication of the annual Top 25list. I have been following this list since its inception in 2004 by AMRResearch, now Gartner, and along the way have drawn some conclusionsabout the processes and technologies it takes to be the best inorchestrating the supply chain. Here is my take on key trends asinspired by this year’s leaders, plus one emerging strategy I predict isthe new “must have.” Let’s see if you agree. Best Practices for Orchestrating the Supply ChainWhenGartner releases its annual Supply Chain list, it is always interestingand fun to see who made the leaders cut on this part achievement, partpopularity contest that is the Top 25. I have written about the list in the past in my CMSWire article series and shared my observations about companies competing on the basis of their supply chain. Asa technologist and a business process improvement practitioner, I amfascinated by the value that a best in class supply chain can deliver toa company and in awe of the Chief Supply Chain Officer (CSCO) and teamof people who can make that happen. In case you are not familiarwith the Top 25, Gartner uses a 50/50 overall weighting for an opinioncomponent and a financial component of the ranking, with the financialsfocused on three metrics: ROA, inventory turns and revenue growth. Whilethe methodology and the Top 25 list itself have changed over the years, it has always been about sharing best practices that have honed theleaders’ supply chains. Of course best practices by their very nature evolve over the years. There was a time when we talked about managingthe supply chain. The CSCO worried about streamlining their supplychain, reducing the number of strategic partners and driving results forthe business by taking costs out of the supply chain. Top of mind wereshrinking inventories, offshoring and outsourcing. While much ofthat is still important, companies are now facing increased complexityand risk in the supply chain, as well as heightened expectations forsupply chain contribution to top line growth. So today’s supply chainleaders find themselves caring more about orchestrating the supply chain, listening and collaborating with partners and customers, while at thesame time finding innovative ways to increase both revenue andsustainability, with engaged and talented teams. This is reflected inthe best practices I see as trending from this year’s Top 25: High performing supply chains collaborate in new ways Leading supply chains pursue performance with purpose Supply chain leaders partner to drive innovation Ithink all three of these must be present to be a Top 25 in the future,just as all parts of a symphony orchestra must be present, workingharmoniously to create the best sound. Trend 1: High performing supply chains collaborate in new waysCollaborationis certainly a strong underlying Top 25 theme. I am excited bycompanies who are looking to collaborate in new ways, especially usingsocial techniques. Using our supply chain symphony analogy, socialcollaboration can be likened to that of the percussion section as ittaps into the pulse of the people, amplifying the beat to create aunified sound. Including these social elements means new ways of sensing and acting upon your supply chain data. Aresponsive supply chain is all about sensing and being demand driven,and supply chain leaders are learning to do this in harmony with the new dynamicsof customer engagement. According to the 2013 Financial PerformanceReport by the GMA and PwC US, “leading CPG companies and retailersbenefit from responding to the speed of the connected digital consumer;top-performing companies see success by engaging with their customers,using digital channels, mobile and direct-to-consumer approaches.” One stand out in the Top 25 is McDonald’s, with “a recent re-emphasis on a strong customer experience, advanceddemand sensing and forecasting capabilities across geographies, and animpressive supplier collaboration framework.” Ray Kroc’s philosophy was, “None of us is as good as all of us.” These days, crowdsourcingand social media are a way to better sense and understand customersthroughout their journey, and these conversations need to be included inthe collaboration for a complete view of your supply chain. Companiesknow they must gain visibility at the boundaries and touch points of thesupply chain flow, and not only in their transaction stream, but alsoin the conversation stream that surrounds these activities. Supply chain teams were some of the first to realize that it was timeto stop talking to employees, partners and customers and instead startlistening to and collaborating with them. The earliest teams found thatthe technology to help them do this was lagging, but that has begun tochange. This year’s number four on the Top 25, Unilever, has undertaken some forward-looking initiatives with crowdsourcing andcollaboration. Crowdsourcing enables a company to broadcast an issue to adiverse audience and ask them to contribute ideas to solve the problem:”The idea is not just to create better solutions but to driveconcerted, cross-sector change.” Unilever adopted a crowdsourcingapproach, inviting all stakeholders to take part in the effort to findways to meet its goals, and unveiled a new Open Innovation websiteplatform to gather and assess ideas from external resources, inviting“anyone who has a fresh, serious approach to new thinking” to pitch in. Aberdeentells us that increasing information visibility is a critical strategyfor complex and multi-tiered global supply-demand networks. They foundthat companies have turned to social listening tools to uncovermeaningful insights hidden among the noise of the social sphere. Infact, data from Aberdeen Group’s Omni-Channel Customer Experience surveysuggests that 48% of companies have deployed social media monitoringand that an additional 38% plan to implement these tools. With the helpof this technology, companies can use the voice of the customer to makecritical adjustments and find issues related to inventory allocation,order management, returns management, cost, overall service satisfactionand beyond. At the same time companies are suffering from information overload. So while effective listening is the first step in a new way to drivevisibility, the next step must be to integrate and synthesize thatinformation with other data and put the results to work in context forthe business. Here too technology has advanced to enable orchestrationcapabilities that include social. The enterprise informationmanagement (EIM) technologies that I work with provide web, social,sharing and integration capabilities to include collaborativeinformation from conversations, emails, social discussions andcrowdsourcing in the discussion that surrounds supply chain processes,partners and customers. Perhaps most importantly they also provide theenterprise content management and case management construct to applythis information to the case or activity at hand, while capturing it forregulatory and audit compliance and for archiving governance. Trend 2: Leading supply chains pursue performance with purposePerhapsthe single strongest theme in the Top 25 narrative this year issustainability. It appears in almost every company ranking description,but quite interestingly not in a vacuum but rather combined with thepursuit of performance excellence across the board. Here again I thinkmy symphony analogy applies well. Just as trumpets and clarinetsmust be blended with the strings in an orchestra to help create theproper sound, so can the pursuit of supply chain operational efficiencybe combined with sustainability to create value for the company. To dothis effectively though, the elements must be carefully orchestrated, asin these examples from Nike, PepsiCo and Chiquita. Nike is citedby Gartner on the Top 25 list for investment in platforms and tools forits suppliers, contract manufacturers and logistics providers, includingsupplier assessment tools that incorporate sustainability-relatedmetrics. Nikehas focused on a number of aspects of sustainability for a decade ormore. Like many leading companies, Nike’s earliest response tosustainability included “going green,” removing paper to improveperformance, and achieving greater straight-through processing in thecase of their financial supply chain. I am familiar with andimpressed by Nike’s case study on using BPM (Business ProcessManagement) apps to improve processes and reduce paper in pursuit of“perfect order” performance — orders delivered in full, on time, everytime — and for improved exception handling when inevitably ordersencounter errors. Paper remains to this day a significant challenge inthe supply chain and finance cash-to-cash cycle, and removing paper isone way to not only improve productivity but also serve sustainabilityobjectives. On the list every year since the Top 25 ranking started, PepsiCois noted this year by Gartner for strengths that include“route-to-market capabilities, strong consumer insights linked to itssupply chain capabilities and an open innovation platform.” Gartner alsohighlights PepsiCo as an early mover in sustainability. I had a front row seat to see the beginnings of the current sustainability trend when I participated in the Supply Leadersin Action (SCLA) council several years ago. Top 25 companies likePepsiCo who are on the council were already showing the way, leveragingtheir supply chain for profitable growth. And that’s not all they weredoing. PepsiCo among others on the SCLA were combining efficiency withgrowth AND sustainability initiatives. PepsiCo coined the phrase“performance with purpose,” which promotes finding innovative ways toreduce the use of energy, water and packaging, and more. They won anSCLA award in 2011 for work in this area. While not on the Top 25 list, Chiquita Brandsreceived their SCLA award in 2009 for excellence in global supply chainmanagement and carbon foot-printing. Earlier this year, one of theirdivisions Chiquita Fruit Solutions demonstrated how they combine acontinuing commitment to sustainability with finding new innovativegrowth applications. Fruit Solutions began as a waste managementstream for bananas that lacked retail-ready appeal. They traditionallymade banana puree but found they couldn’t use the peel and some of thefibrous material left over. They used to just dispose of it by movingthe sludge off-site but then asked themselves, “What else can we do withthat?” The question presented an opportunity to enhance the company’ssustainability efforts. Chiquita began using the material to generateelectricity in another one of its plants. Maurice Morange, their generalmanager, highlights, “With the pressure on the world for carbon releasein the environment, we see this as another way that Chiquita willcontribute and take a leadership role not only in terms of the cost todeliver to consumers but the mechanism and manner in which we operateour facilities day in and day out.” Now a recent new product ideais resulting from that same Fruit Solutions initiative, a ready-to-eatsnack product for retail, crunchy banana, pineapple and mango chipsproduced with patent-pending technology that involves no added sugar,oil or preservatives. In my view, both PepsiCo and Chiquita aregreat examples of bringing a brand to life in meaningful new ways. AsGartner recommends in their Top 25 report for companies, they “setaspirational goals and connect the dots between the work people do everyday in supply chain and its contribution to the societies within whichthey live, building engaged supply chain talent that can lead businessgrowth.” Trend 3: Supply chain leaders partner to drive innovationEveryorchestra needs its conductor and that is the role that the best of thebest Chief Supply Chain Officers play in our supply chain symphony. Butincreasingly they are working in concert with a new set of marketingrock stars to partner on a new product idea-to-launch. Starbucks is a perfect example on the Top 25. Gartnernotes that Starbucks “puts the notion of an outside-in orientation intopractice, measuring the success of its supply chain from the storeback. Its focus on strong integration between supply chain and newproduct launch is evidenced by the success of the Starbucks K-Cup, citedas one of the top 10 food and beverage launches in 2012.” I think it is very telling that one of the most impressive, market oriented and innovative supply chain leaders that I met at the SCLA from Chiquita is now joining Starbucks to head up their global supply chain initiatives. PwC’sAnnual Global CEO Survey found that CEOs see innovation as the vehiclebest suited to put them on the road for growth. In the survey, 79% ofCEOs expect their innovation developments will drive efficiencies andcreate competitive advantages, alongside the 78% who expect innovationto generate significant new sources of revenue over the next threeyears. “Part of [being smarter] about growth is partnership across thebusiness. Leading high-tech and CP companies, for instance, areapproaching new markets with cross-functional teams that include sales,marketing, operations and IT to holistically design a synchronized entrystrategy — starting with the customer and designing the right product,pricing, margin targets, service levels, and supply chain network designand trade-offs that will all work together to achieve the goal.” The best companies in the world have customer-centric supply chainsTheTop 25 remind us that the best companies in the world have highperforming customer-oriented supply chains and supply chain teams. Wealso see that the best companies are increasingly finding new ways tocompete by leveraging innovations that are informed by new customerdata, which is being collected in new ways, and in turn made possibleand practical by their high performing supply chains. Here then is boththe opportunity and the danger ahead. The voice of the customerhas been around for quite some time, Multiple functions including thesupply-chain have paid close attention to the value of activities thatcan amplify and clarify through that voice. Today though there are newways of reaching out to customers, partners, and employees. Marketinghas been first to experiment with and understand both the technology andthe results of outreach activities like crowdsourcing for the business. In his recent Forbes article, Dan Woods discusses how the rise in CMO led technology investments is creating a siloof potentially valuable information and points to the importance of theCIO in implementing a platform to share and integrate this kind of datathroughout the business. Dan notes that the signals found in socialmedia and other marketing analysis can contain valuable information thatcan be used by many different parts of the company. While he doesn’tspecifically call out the supply chain, I will. We know thatcompanies have traditionally employed sales and operations planning(S&OP) to achieve focus, alignment and synchronization across theorganization. Done well, the S&OP process can help enable highlyeffective supply chain management. Sales integration has long been afocus for demand driven supply chains. But disconnected S&OP, ERP,CRM, and home grown systems are not well designed to withstand changingproducts, supplier costs and pressures, regulations and customer demandsthat exist today. Now there is a whole new set of data criticalto both innovation and a responsive supply chain that is being generatedlargely through marketing-led efforts. The CIO needs to ensure that aplatform, like the enterprise information management technology that Iwork with, is implemented across the enterprise so that the supply chaincan take both the structured systems data and the unstructured datagenerated around the customer social profile, integrate it and mostimportantly use it in context for their critical business decisions. Tome, it has become very clear that both the oldest and the newestorchestration challenge for the supply chain is to work in partnershipwith an outside-in customer centric approach. That is why I believe thatmarketing is going to be the supply chain leader’s new best friendforever. What differentiates the best supply chain companies from therest is an unwavering focus across the business on the customer and, forthe future, the technology to be able to integrate and leverage thatfocus. So I predict that supply chain and marketing leaders willindeed become #BFFs, and they are going to need their CIO to make theintroductions!

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Dear Anonymous Viewers on LinkedIn: Why?

I’ve been dabbling in LinkedIn recently and have noticed that there have been a number of “Anonymous” or “Pseudo-Anonymous” viewers looking at my profile. I’ve been trying to come up with a reason that someone would either block themselves completely or only show me what company they’re currently employed at and here are a few theories. Theory 1 – Total Privacy As most other public facing social networks don’t tell you who viewed your profile, some people see an inherent need to protect their identity. I can understand this concern but here’s the kicker; you’re on here to virtually network with people you may have worked with in the past and I don’t know about you but sometimes I remember people who don’t remember me or vice versa and isn’t establishing a network all about reconnecting? You’re not going to end up being very successful at doing that if you’re hiding in the proverbial LinkedIn bushes! Theory 2 – The Memory Game When people allow you to see who they work for, along with a list of people who work at that company in a similar role, identifying your contact can involve some flexing of the memory muscle. I’m exceedingly good with names so I really enjoy this part, but I doubt this is fun for most people. Going back to the idea of reconnecting and building your network, this makes things increasingly difficult if someone with this setting has moved jobs a few times since you’ve last worked with them. Theory 3 – Paranoia I saw an experiment on my LinkedIn account where someone had asked people to like a status they made in order to see how far the extended connections they had could reach. At last count it was somewhere over 400,000 likes. The point I’m getting at with this is that it proves how interconnected we are. It might be fair to assume that some people choose to protect their identity as they don’t want the person they’re viewing to mention something to their mutual connections. In the end It all comes down to your level of comfort, but you could be smart about the whole thing and when you’re network building let your whole self shine through, and if you’re in job search mode and are trying to be stealthy, switch back to one of the anonymous options. Why do you use the option you’re currently using or do you switch your privacy settings at all?

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Customer Experience Management: Art vs. Science

This is a CMSWire cross-post. There is a long-standing debate as to how much of customer experience management is science and how much is art. Asyou decide where you weigh in on the question, here are two customerexperiences for your consideration. While one experience is a customersatisfaction triumph and a pleasure to share, the other tells acautionary tale. They both illustrate the critically important roletechnology can play, blending science and art to create positiveimpressions and continuing customer loyalty. Customer Experience Management is PersonalAs followers of my CMSWire article seriesknow, I often write about how technology properly applied can changehow we do business for the better. Customer experience management livesin the oceans of data being generated every day in ever increasingamounts. This Big Data offers competitive opportunities, givingcompanies new ways to listen, learn and respond to their customers’needs. The technology I work with plays an important role in allowingcompanies to extract and apply value from Big Data. The results areespecially powerful when connected with the customer experience. Thegoal is to forge relevant interactions that are both efficient for thebusiness to deliver and at the same time personalized for the customer.And sometimes it gets VERY personal, because after all, we are allconsumers. Here is a look at two of my recent customer experiences. Youmay conclude, as I did, that it’s not a question of art vs. science increating extraordinary experiences, but rather how well you combine thetwo. Customer Experience 1: Web to Store to #DelightSaturdaymorning and I’m searching the web for of all things a replacement for adoor threshold. Our kitchen walk-in cupboard threshold had splinteredover the years and we decided we would replace it ourselves. This seemeda simple task, though in the spirit of full disclosure we are not a DIYfamily by any means. My web search for thresholds immediatelyreveals well-recognized possibilities from two of the leaders in homeimprovement. I begin to explore both and come to the realization that Iam not only viewing this customer experience from my homeowner personabut also from my “day job” persona. I am indeed part of the trend formore business happening online and product research increasingly movingto online as the first destination. I notice that both online sites aredoing a good job of organizing and presenting the product informationand images, and also providing relevant do-it-yourself video options. Then, I realize I’m late for errands we have scheduled, so I abandon mylaptop, head for the car, and continue my research on my iPhone in route(I am passenger not driver). Whether on my laptop or on myiPhone, the respective web experiences are quite good. Clearly thesecompanies use customer experience management technologies to create arich and consistent digital presence across channels. Both have whatappear to be responsive designs and good in-context channel features.Both web customer experiences immediately identify where My Store wouldbe — one got it right on the money but both are easy to adjust. Bothoffer some form of free shipping too, probably a nod to the online-onlytop competitor, whose advantage is most often fast shipping and low(er)pricing. Both companies seem to have what we need at a comparableprice, but we are not really certain we have found the right item, andwe wonder what we would need to do to “install it.” Since we are outdoing errands anyway, we decide to stop by the local Home Depot store. Thestore has the item its website displayed and at the promised price. Inperson, it doesn’t look quite like the shape of the splintered one wehad brought with us for comparison. Enter customer experience rock starCharlie, who leads the lumber department at the store. Charlie notonly assures us that we have the right item, but he also offers to trimand notch the piece based on the old one so it will be simple toreplace. But it turns out the notches need a saw they don’t have at thestore, so Charlie TAKES THE PIECE HOME TO HIS WORKSHOP, cuts it andbrings it back the next day, leaving me a message confirming that it isready to pick up. I go on the Home Depot FB to tell them about my bestcustomer experience EVER and hear right back from them thanking ME. Idon’t know if this is an isolated incident, but I do know Home Depot isdoing something right these days. They have shown the strength of theirbrand and their channel management in the last three months, withoverall sales up 13.9% and same-store sales up 7 percent. There was noextra charge for my Home Depot customer experience, though we certainlywould have paid. The result for Home Depot is that they not only wonthis small transaction but now also have a customer for life. #DELIGHT Customer Experience 2: Store to Mobile to #FailCustomerexperience management isn’t just for traditional retailers. Banking isincreasingly coming to terms with the importance of coordinatingchannels to attract and retain their retail customer business.Multi-channel is certainly necessary, but is no longer sufficient forsuccess. Now omni-channel has hit the financial services world as amajor factor in customer experience management. Cisco® refers tothis new reality as the “Era of Omni-channel Banking,” explaining thatit moves beyond the current approach, in which banks encourage customersto use the least expensive channel, to delivering a consistent andseamless customer experience across channels. The intent is to bring theindustry closer to the promise of true contextual banking in whichfinancial services become seamlessly embedded into the lives ofindividual and business customers. Creating a positive end-to-endcustomer experience is at the heart of this approach and banks aremoving toward secure integrated architectures to enable theirchannel-ready infrastructure. This future sounds great, but we stillhave a lot to learn in the here and now about holistic customerexperience management. Case in point is my own customer experience thatoccurred on the very same day that Home Depot had so delighted me. Iam shopping for pet food at a store we often frequent, and am at thecheck-out with a large order when my credit card transaction is deniedby the system. I immediately receive a message on my mobile phone tocall my bank security with a return number to call. Okay … thissounds very omni-channel and actually quite responsive and responsible.I’m a bit annoyed that my transaction was rejected, but somewhatmollified by the notion that my bank is being circumspect. This bank hasa fabulous website in my opinion and a pretty good IVR system as well,and I viewed them as advanced in their approach to customer experience.So I return the call and provide the usual account and securityinformation to the IVR system. A human voice then comes on the line,clearly reading from a script, asking me for the same information I hadjust entered PLUS additional security information. I provide it. Iam told my account is flagged and I’ll be transferred to a securityspecialist to ensure it is properly unblocked, and thanks for mypatience. I am not particularly known for my patience, but had come thisfar and would see it through since we had two very hungry goldenretrievers waiting at home. I am put on hold for a couple ofminutes and then another human voice clearly following a script asks meAGAIN for the SAME INFORMATION I had just provided. I ask why since (1)they had called me originally and told me to call them; (2) they hadthen transferred me; and (3) I had already given them the informationtwice so surely they already knew it. I am told if I do not want toprovide the information my account would remain blocked. Seriously? So, Icomplete the discussion, providing once again all and more of theinformation they asked for, and my account is unblocked. Perhapsthe worst of all in this experience was that the bank representativecould not (or would not) provide a clear reason why they had determinedto block my card at that moment, and they also left me with the warningthat it might happen again. I quickly run my card and successfullycomplete the transaction before another random event, perhaps sunshowers or gamma rays on the moon might trigger a similar block. #FAIL Perfecting the Science, Enabling the Art of Customer ExperienceIspend a great deal of my professional time helping companies gainbenefit from enterprise information management, the discipline ofdiscovering, managing, extracting value from and building applicationson top of unstructured enterprise information. EIM can bring togethercore technologies and applications within defined practices likeCustomer Experience Management. I have come to understand that totranslate information-based capabilities into value for the enterpriserequires the right technology tool set and approach that changes how theorganization accomplishes work. When this is combined with behavioralscience and artfully applied to the customer experience, it offers asimple, powerful route to improved customer satisfaction. McKinseywrites about “Using behavioral science to improve the customerexperience” noting that companies who care deeply about the quality ofcustomer interactions invest heavily in responsive websites and insimplified call centers that enable customer choice. Yet many companiesignore what makes people tick. Banks, for example, often disturb thecustomer experience through poor menus on ATMs or ill-advised and everchanging interactive-voice-response (IVR) systems. Other companies placetoo much emphasis on average handling times at call centers and notenough on the quality of the interaction. It doesn’t have to be thatway. Academics, such as Professor Richard Chase at the Universityof Southern California’s Marshall School of Business, have used researchon how people form opinions about their experiences to design actualservices. Chase and his team set forth principles to consider whendesigning any customer interaction; including: Get bad experiences over early, so customers focus more on positive subsequent elements of the interaction. Break-uppleasure, but combine pain for your customers, so that pleasant partsof the interaction form a stronger part of their recollections. Finish strong, as the final elements of the interaction will stick in the customers’ memory. Iventure to say that each of these scientific principles was violated inmy recent bank credit card interaction, and exceeded in my DIYexperience. Customer experience then is certainly partscience, part art, part technology and part human. And effectivecustomer experience management is a competitive weapon, especially inindustries where product differentiation is difficult, if notimpossible. For example, my door threshold and my credit card productsare fairly comparable across their respective vendors; thedifferentiation happens through the customer experience that isprovided. The moral of my two tales is to ensure customerexperience management capability is organized and implemented to becustomer-centric and applied in the moment to optimize the “personal”customer experience. In fact, recent Aberdeen Group research on “NextGeneration Customer Experience Management” shows that Best-in Classcompanies: Invest in CEM-related technology tools and solutions Create a unified view of customer data across the organization, and Personalize product and service offerings based on customer data Anew set of priorities and technologies are necessary to orchestratewhat is required for more effective customer experience management, andwe need to include all touch points, including the experience a customerhas with company representatives. This is true for my consumerexperiences and true in turn for the customers I serve, who aretypically large firms that operate in multinational environments withmultiple languages, and want to reach their customers through amultitude of channels. To succeed, these companies will use aholistic technology and business approach that includes customerexperience, information and communication management, as well as aninformation flow or case management paradigm that ensures the customeris the organizing principal. They will leverage technology to blend thebest of art and science with the customer in mind. At the sametime, encouraging employees to be motivated, customer-orientedrepresentatives of the company, and giving them the power to #delightcustomers wouldn’t hurt either! Editor’s Note: To read more of Deb’s thoughts on Customer Experience, see her Oz the Great and Powerful: How ACM Transforms the Customer Experience

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Unveiling Brand Moments That Matter

I am very excited for the latest release of our Web Experience Management product – we are transforming organizations worldwide with powerful new capabilities we unveiled this week. Our launch themes are designed to empower marketers, customer service and every line of business to engage the new digital consumer in this age of experience. Organizations must rethink how they can deliver branded moments that matter across different geographies, languages, social and media channels. We have enabled the enterprise to be truly responsive – agile and adaptive to the consumer at the moment they want to engage with you. It is imperative that every marketer worldwide reinvest in the web to deliver targeted experiences that flow across devices and screens. OpenText can enable an organization today to engage the new mobile consumer in a way that brings agility to digital marketing campaigns and at the same time engage the employee and embrace the partner channel all with the same CEM solution. It is no longer only about sharing information across multiple touch points. Organizations must map the individual’s journey with targeted omni-channel experiences across mobile, social and traditional www sites. It is one thing to be responsive but more importantly, organizations must deliver targeted moments that matter incorporating digital media from DAM to traditional print from CCM – nothing else is like it on the planet. Seeing is believing! This week,we showcased the new release of WEM at an event in San Francisco, California at the Exploratorium on Pier 15. We had guests from all across North America join us to see the product up close and hear first-hand, amazing stories from two of our customers – Wells Fargo and Taco Bell. Lori Robinson from Wells Fargo shared insights into how all 275,000 team members can use Web Experience Management to increase productivity and access information that in turn improves the end customer experience. With every percentage point of productivity and information access improvement comes thousands (if not millions) of dollars in revenue gains. Nicholas Tran from Taco Bell stated he has“the best job in the world” working with the website and social media to capture his customers’ experiences. His team helps build brand awareness by sharing stories, both humanitarian and fun, with others through WEM. If you missed it – check out www.opentext.com/wem.

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Journey to a New User Interface

Good User Interface Design is highlysubjective. It falls in the category of “I’ll know it when I see it.”Yet, it is a critical part of every development effort. I am workingwith several people on a project to come up with a new interface for ourDigital Asset Management product and I want to share this fascinatingjourney as a diary of how we get there. At OpenText we arefortunate to have some UI Design experts with a background in behavioralpsychology. They have been busy interviewing users to create detaileddossiers to help understand the “typical” user. These profiles, calledPersonas, are based on the various roles of people within anorganization who interact with the software. Our meeting discussedthe information gathered from interviews with users andcapturing thatin the personas. We then can start to map out the tasks, concerns, andpriorities for the persona; what they care about and what they need todo get the job done. We discussed “Barb” the job owner. She coordinatesprojects and campaigns making sure the work is assigned and completed ina timely manner. It was interesting how much information has beencaptured about Barb. In just looking how to initiate a new project thereare many steps. Barb interacts with people and the software-notifications and responses, automatically using templates to createproject and folder structures, and all the associated reporting anddashboards to allow her to track projects, assign tasks, and monitorprogress. Some of the questions are how does Barb prepare the campaignor project for different market segments and channels? Who needs thisinformation? How does she collaborate, review and approve created works? Thefirst stage of the journey is discovery, and a major part isinterviewing and understanding the users. There are many roles thatinteract with the software, with many different needs and differentpriorities. Digital Asset Management is used for creative workflows,campaigns and projects, distribution and delivery; it is an integralpart of the digital media supply chain. The next stage is creatingsome wire frames for the UI and drilling down on the technology for apresentation layer. I’m just a layman, I am not a user inteface expert.However, I do use lots of different UI’s and I know a good one when Isee it.

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Thoughts on “5 Reasons Why DAM is No Photoshop”

I saw this thought provoking article by David Diamond in CMS Wire, “5 Reasons Why DAM is No Photoshop” (read it here) and wanted to share some of my thoughts. We both agree that DAM is no Photoshop, and I am sure even more reasons could be listed. However, I am curious as to why the comparison of DAM to PhotoShop? Is it to show how DAM has missed the mainstream boat, why DAM has not evolved into “SharePoint for the masses”? (although Microsoft would like to see it that way…) I think there are many factors in play. PhotoShop is tool for creatives – highly flexible and complex, not intuitive, too many buried menus, hard to discover capabilities and a significant learning curve. And yet, as you point out it has become the leader. It also caters to a highly skilled professional market. Other Photoshop-like systems are out there to address the non-professionals, freeware like Paint.net, photo editing tools and even mobile apps. In the world of DAM there is not a professional community per se, few organizations have identified roles for DAM Managers and those who use DAM are frequently the casual user or consumer of content. And as you know DAM can mean anything and everything, the lack of or continually expanding definition has perplexed the industry for a while. That said, your points are valid. There is a bit of schizophrenia in DAM. On one side we work with the creatives managing assets, workflow, work-in-progress all those things that are not part of the core competency of tools such as Photoshop. On the other side are business, marketing, operations and delivery departments all interacting with digital assets and DAM. Digital assets are aggregated from other sources such as stock photos and agencies, requring usage and rights management. Assets are repurposed, refreshed and reused as they move through their lifecycle, prepped, formatted and conformed to the for delivery and distribution to a myriad of destinations, platforms and devices. How do vendors, even dinosaur vendors, drive innovation and communicate better? I think part of it is a focus on the core competency of what DAM offers with the added understanding that systems exist in an ecosystem. I see it as DAM providing that core infrastructure for an organization – multiple systems and people being able to securely access that body of well-organized, cataloged, indexed and findable content to serve any number of purposes. Our experience has been that innovation is happening in the organization in partnership with vendors. Clever developers working with open API’s and flexible platforms interfacing with business, and creative systems; integrating with software to streamline and automate on-line, mobile, video, print and other delivery. The goal is not a complex, monolithic application geared only for professionals – like Photoshop – but a platform or infrastructure allowing controlled, secure access to the digital assets – the IP of the organization, integrating workflows and applications to connect people, processes and technology. This is what will help organizations be more successful as the digital world continues to saturate everything an organization does.

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Is Video Social Media’s Next Frontier?

We all know that the last major disruptive media shift of ourlifetime was from print to video, but in the current climate of socialtechnologies we’ve moved back to empowering the written word and thatvalue and power is obviously now derived from the analysis of what wetype in public channels and how that data is mined to determine how totarget ads or content to us. Thetechnology has even progressed to a point where what we say can beanalyzed to determine the sentiment of our wording outside of sarcasmsince that’s a tough thing to crack using text alone. The latesttrend in social has manifested itself as a mixture of media types. Thismeans that people are now including pictures and video into theirupdates more frequently. Along this vein there have been severalexamples of companies who are video centric, trying to embed socialtechnologies alongside their service or content in order to associate orglean a measurable metric from it. A few established examples of this include CTV recently embedding a live chat alongside it’s live streaming of the Oscars,online video chat service TokBox providing the ability to inviteTwitter followers to an ongoing video chat, Google Hangouts on Airmixing G+ conversations and video content, and TWiT.TV using and sometimes including comments from a live IRC chat during their show tapings. Morerecently this phenomenon has moved into more specialized apps such asthe ever present Instagram that allows you to publically share photos,Snapchat which allows you to send time bombed pictures or video tospecific contacts, and Vine which allows you to share 6 seconds videoclips with your Twitter followers. What these apps andestablished companies have not managed to do is take the actual image orvideo and audio content they’re creating and analyze it for theinfinitely richer and thus more valuable information it contains. Ifthere was technology attached to these previously mentioned examplesthat could analyze the tone of what someone is saying, then the abilityto determine sentiment becomes a given, and sarcasm could also beanalyzed correctly. When it comes to video, body language and staticobjects could be analyzed with the audio to determine if they play afactor or are related. In a search to see who may have considered video and audio sentiment analysis, I’ve found a somewhat promising video specific project, an interesting audio paper from 1999 that talks about converting spoken word to text and using that for analysis, the usage of spectrograms in Shazam to create fingerprints for songs in its database, and also skimmed a couple of papers looking at text analysis which are at least 3 or more years old now. Allof this makes me wonder when we are going to start evolving andcombining some of these audio and video initiatives and begin analyzingwhere we’re obviously heading next? Can you imagine a YouTubevideo with a negative sentiment towards a product or service beingprefixed with an ad that is actually related and counteracts withpositive information to the content you’re about to watch?!

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Productive or Time Wasting – Can We Stop Asking the Question Now?

This image has been floating around Facebook for a few weeks now and it really struck a chord with me. The image made me ask myself a few questions such as; has social media really changed how I work; do I work better or are these pure distractions from the task at hand? I may be showing my age, but I started into the work force just as email was catching on and I remember asking a few of my co-workers whether or not I should even add my email address to my business card. Now I can’t imagine how I would do my job without it. The average person spends 13 hours per week processing email, but some weeks I feel as though email is all I do. Of course nowadays email is just a small part of the various channels of communication that I work with day to day. My day use to start and end in email but these days I typically start my day in Twitter, move back and forth from email to our own social collaboration tool, a few minutes on Facebook, possibly a quick peek into LinkedIn and then back to Twitter – and of course this is often done from a mix of my mobile and laptop. Has this new way of working across the “omni channel” made me more productive? I think the answer is yes! I am more connected, have a more transparent view of my organization and a wealth of experts at my fingertips. These new channels are not here to disrupt my style of work or displace my email. This is just the evolution of work as we know it. The importance is learning how to adopt these tools effectively and educating the workface on their importance in a way that showcases meaning and purpose in their use. As Jacob Morgan writes in a recent post; http://www.jmorganmarketing.com/enterprise-collaboration-replacing/ “….the notion of working 9-5 from an office is being replaced by the idea of being able to “connect to work;” an employee feeling like a cog is being replaced by the voice of the engaged employee; email and intranets are being replaced by networked and connected systems; yearly reviews are being replaced by real-time feedback; working in silos is being replaced by cross-boundary collaboration, and the traditional idea of what it means to be an organization is being replaced by evolving to a collaborative organization.” I see this as progress, do you?

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Maintaining employee engagement in social business software

When it comes to introducing anynew system into an organization the first thing that goes through mostemployees minds is usually ‘Oh great…*Another* system I’m going to beforced to use. Add it to the list!’ Whilethat sentiment is unavoidable the difference when it comes tosocialbusiness software is finding a way to implement it along with aculturethat supports the use of it and establishes a purpose. Some good examples of this include gathering feedback on an inclusive initiative, or establishing a company-wide community of people interested in a specific topic. This is not an easy task and ‘dropping’ the software into your organization isn’t going to be a magic pill that solves everything. If you want social software to succeed there are several things you could do as part of your rollout to establish and maintain theengagementlevel. Include champions in different sections of your organization as part of the project team deploying the solution This step is meant to ensure that you have a solid base ofpeople who are energized and interested in making use of the solution intheir own departments. The feedback gleaned could be invaluable and youthen have a dedicated group of testers to help you with yourimplementation. These people may eventually end up being CommunityManagers for their respective communities. Use the solution in a test or beta environment to solve a specific problem or achieve a goal Nothing reaffirms the value of something to people likecoming together to solve a common problem or achieve a goal. This isalso a good opportunity to test the implementation and see what parts ofthe software worked in which scenarios. It’s also a good way todetermine what areas need to be revisited. Havethe champions or Community Managers summarize important details of thecommunity they’re involved in into weekly updates to members that linkback to the community In general, when users join a community there is an initial spike in adoption followed by a gradual decline in engagement,with users complaining that social software is too overwhelming orconfusing. Providing weekly updates or summaries slowly makes theseusers check-in and enables them to engage on their own schedule. Enable email and/or RSS notifications Since the inception of email we’ve been conditioned to have conversations and collaborate on documents in long and unmanageable email threads.Fighting this urge is often futile and will likely only spur lessadoption. In a similar fashion to step 3, if you enable emailnotifications you’re slowly transitioning people from a long emailthread to using something such as a wiki to brainstorm or draft aspecific topic, document, or idea. Establish a publishing schedule for your community While this might be taking a page out of an external socialmedia strategy, the same principal of keeping customers engaged worksfor keeping your employees engaged. If a blog or social feed isn’tupdated, you’re not giving people a reason to interact. If you’relacking ideas (it happens to all of us) ensure you are following othercommunity managers or champions and share their content to keep yourcommunity active. Alternatively you can bring in ideas from externalsocial media channels that can also generate conversation. WhileI’ve touched on some things, this is by no means an exhaustive list nora roadmap or recipe for success. There are several other factors totake into account when you plan to deploy a social software solutioninto your organization. The following list of resources provides someguidance and insight on how to achieve a smooth implementation andincrease engagement: You want to be a social business? 9 boxes you need to check Work out Loud: Stop Knowledge Hoarding! Getting Real About Employee Engagement The Adoption Peak and why it’s not a good thing Could the Junk Drawer 1.0 become the Junk Drawer 2.0? It’s not the same thing – The 3 types of collaboration

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While reminiscing about a recent trip to London, England I was reminded of my travels on the Underground. With every step onto or off the commuter train I was instructed by the overhead loud speaker to pay close attention to the small opening in front of me. Any misstep could have caused harm or hindered my journey onward. There have been a number of conversations about the importance of marketing automation tools and WEM’s function in helping organizations elevate brand identity and distinguish themselves from all the noise and other distractions. A larger customer experience ecosystem begins to emerge where both technologies play critical roles in helping organizations understand a 3-D view of their customer and deliver optimized online experiences. As marketing programs and campaigns become more sophisticated, we need to be “mindful” of some of the hand-off points and gaps between these complimentary technologies. As with all hot new buzzwords “marketing automation” is not a new concept and has been around for some time. Marketing Automation is the process of creating and defining programs and campaigns that engage customers across multiple, interactive touch points. Following specific rules of engagement (e.g. scoring) the intent is to generate demand, nurture and convert only those leads that are qualified. Reporting and accountability are essential at every touch point and are used by marketing departments to justify each dollar spent. WEM solutions support all online marketing initiatives by providing marketers (such as content authors, web designers and graphic designers) with simplified tools for creating and managing all your corporate web properties. It delivers dynamic, interactive, personalized and contextualized web content to customers regardless of the channel they arrive from. Inherent in these tools are enterprise social capabilities that allow for ongoing collaborative discussions that facilitate expert communities of knowledge. Finally, web and social analytics tools collect and measure real-time, click stream data in the context of the published “live” site. What if you could have both technologies working together harmoniously? A fully integrated marketing platform that exchanged customer related information, supported all marketing related activities, and managed your corporate brand content from one central point of access? The goal of marketing automation and WEM is to integrate marketing processes that collect data and content from multiple locations toward developing meaningful customer relationships that begin and continue well after the initial sales cycle is complete. Consumers do not want to feel as though they are being marketed at — they want to feel the content they uncover is part of their organic efforts. Let’s look at some of the gaps between the two technologies: 1. The Focus on Content Marketing Sourced for the Web According to Forrester’s report “The Rise of Content Marketing: Invest In Content Development and Management for Success,” 58 percent of marketers consider their website to be the most important channel when creating interactive marketing content, second to social media (15%). Marketers will continue to evolve and enhance the online experience by creating great and meaningful content for their sites. It’s no surprise that companies that invest in WEM solutions report greater online success in delivering and managing all corporate content. Marketing automation solutions need to leverage not only the creation of new content for websites but all the other technical features in WEM. For example, WEM systems can determine how content is consumed and from what device; gather analytics on customer behavior, geo-location, previous interactions and social media participation. This type of data can be used by marketing automation solutions to influence how subsequent follow-up conversations get started and remain open. 2. CMO and CIO Alignment A consistent trend I’m seeing is how marketers are solving their own business problems with little or no IT intervention. End users are self-provisioning solutions, in the cloud or on premises, and using marketing spend to do so. WEM solutions traditionally owned, built and secured by IT are now sharing ownership with marketing. But a three dimensional view of the customer can only be achieved when information can be gathered from all corporate data stores — whether managed by IT or marketing. According the Aberdeen Group report “Enhancing Customer Experience through CIO and CMO Alignment,” companies with CIO and CMO alignment achieve a 10.1 percent higher annual year-over-year growth in ROMI, compared with 5.6 percent of their peers. “This shows that partnering with peers in IT helps marketers better analyze customer information and launch campaigns that deliver quantifiable results by addressing changing customer needs.” 3. Omni-Channel Consistency Marketers are faced with the challenge of providing a consistent online experience across all delivery touch points — namely mobile devices. The same challenge is replicated by a marketing automation tool that needs to maintain a dialogue via the same context of the interaction. WEM solutions offer native support to many social media features (e.g. blogs, wikis, discussion threads) and packaged integration into many social networking sites. Harnessing WEM’s targeted listening capabilities will enhance how marketing automation tools evaluate customer engagement and influence lead scoring. 4. Cross-enterprise Information Processing Customers are engaged with a number of different systems stored across the enterprise — ERP, CRM, e-Commerce, WEM and CMS. The proper application of a Business Process Management system can capture content and metadata from multiple corporate locations and help facilitate marketing automation systems to properly respond to customer inquiries. 5. Capturing Return on Marketing Investment (ROMI) Marketing wisdom tell us that if you cannot measure effectiveness, you cannot measure its change. Without a common set of metrics, as provided by both systems, all marketing efforts are at risk and offer no opportunity for correction and improvement. According to the Aberdeen report “CEM: Using the Power of Analytics to Optimize Customer Delight,” “analytical tools are a critical component for providing businesses with the intelligence that can be used to create both contextual and potential prospect / customer conversations.” One of the common questions I hear from customers is “how do we collect data from disparate systems, which utilize different metrics, and standardize it within one meaningful report?” Rather than selling products or services to your customers, ensure that both your WEM and marketing automation system’s primary goal is to help customers find the information they need. Identifying and addressing these gaps is the first step in achieving a complete customer view that elevates your brand to one that generates loyalty, advocacy and satisfaction. My advice — Don’t try and close all the gaps at once. Start small but think big. Start by integrating “progressive profiling” in your WEM system so that it passes information to your marketing automation tool. This will provide incremental insights into what prospects are looking to understand and qualify how likely they will be to purchase. Image courtesy of dutourdumonde (Shutterstock)

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The Human Enterprise: Progress or Perish

This is a CMSWire cross-post. Perhapsthe most welcome business innovation in the 21st century is therealization that the 1990’s CEO pablum, “People are our greatest asset”is actually true. This means that business must rebalance itsstructures and processes to support and enable people rather than tocontrol and contain them while they service the processes andinfrastructure. A flipped business if you will. A humanized rather than mechanized ideal of the perfectly efficient organization. Ithas finally been proved — what everyone already knew was true —employees who give a darn [sic] do better work, which makes their luckyemployers more successful. So we are thrilled that work willfinally evolve away from what has often been a negative experience, andstart becoming place where people thrive — along with the economy andsociety at large. It all sounds great. But it is an earth-shiftingchange that leaves many management teams uncertain and uncomfortableand many employees frustrated. A human-centric business questions someof the fundamental tenets of traditional enterprise design andoperation, and it will take some time to sort it out. Being human iscomplex and being a business is complicated and so growing together issure to be a precarious but altogether magnificent undertaking. As yet however, many of us are still in a hard place. Drivers of DisengagementThereare three ways that work becomes a soul-crushing, disengaging job thatleads to “it’s fine like that,” what-kind-of-shortcuts-can-i-take, andthe-least-I-can-get-away-with effort. 1. Work that asks people to do stupid stuffThiscan be menial work, in which the person doing the work has no stake orimpact on the outcome. Think fast food, factory work, mail delivery orother work that is heavily routinized and automated. A craft isdifferent, because it involves mastery — these jobs do not. This alsohappens when the policies or processes of work are flawed in ways thatare obvious to employees, but aren’t likely to change as a result. 2. Work that prevents people from doing good stuffManyknowledge workers suffer in this camp, though often craftsmen(builders, etc.) and service providers (nurses, consultants) do too. [Myhousekeeper quit her company for this reason and started her own, so myhouse is cleaner.] They have ideas, aspirations, curiosity, commitmentto quality, but their management is so focused on maintaining the statusquo that it is nearly impossible for these people to do any of the goodwork that they want to do. [This status-quo fetish is a frequent andsometimes unintended consequence of command and control hierarchies. Theantidote is leadership.] 3. Work that takes undeveloped souls and keeps them in the darkHirepeople to do something, and never invite or enable them to developtheir skills or to do more than they were hired for, and what you willget is glassy eyed mushrooms. These people disengage because they don’tknow anything better. There can be many causes of stagnation, but simplyaccepting it is a losing strategy. So how do we go fromunintentionally soul-crushing to the labor’s Valhalla we seek?(Intentional soul-crushing is another matter altogether.) Dan Pinkshowed us that intrinsic motivation is vastly superior to externalmotivation (do this, get that) to drive effort and outcomes for all butthe most mechanical of tasks. Pink’s model shows that people are engaged(intrinsically motivated) when their work has three elements: Mastery – the ability to demonstrate and constantly improve one’s craft Autonomy – the ability to solve problems and make decisions on their own Purpose – the idea that their work matters as part of a greater whole. (Click here If you haven’t seen his classic TED talk). Pinkfocuses on the individual, however, and what we need to understand hereis how to make that work for organizations. There are those that claimthe drivers of employee engagementare “Relationship with immediate supervisor, Belief in seniorleadership, Pride in working for the company.” But normal people willrecognize those as markers (KPIs), rather than drivers of engagement. Drivers of Engagement (The human enterprise) 1. PurposeIfI don’t believe that my company is valuable, then my work is notvaluable, and therefore I don’t value it, so I don’t invest in it — I amnot engaged. Duh. Purpose, however, is not limited to green andeleemosynary causes (thanks for tolerating my nerdy words, it meanscharitable). A corporate purpose is an understanding of the change youwant to make in the world — whether it is to make people happier,richer, more entertained, more constructive in their work, etc. Purpose must be deeply authentic, and not just a carefully crafted-by-committee Mission Statement. I talked more about why it matters here. In order to scale beyond small business size, purpose must be accompanied by narrative— that expresses that purpose to your customers, your market and youremployees. This gives everyone the ability to connect with, tell andbuild his or her own part of the story. 2. Transparency and ImpactYoumay find yourself with a purpose, and you may mean it, and you may findyourself with a marketing plan that expresses it and a roadmap thatbuilds it (congrats to you) (if you’re saying to yourself, this is notmy beautiful purpose, this is not my beautiful roadmap, then read on).But to make it work, to make it great, you need a team of people whohave full, mutual awareness of what they are doing and what theleadership is worried about. If people can’t see the drivers oftheir work (why) , and the impact of their work (how’d I do?), theycan’t be engaged. If R&D doesn’t know what marketing is pushing andmarketing doesn’t know about the latest innovation, and the plan tore-architect the customer support program, and the team in Europe’s newexperiment and the recent customer loss or win and the six majordecisions that the executive team is working through, then they areprobably not very engaged. When people don’t know what is goingon, they can not consciously affect its outcome. They are not engaged.Transparency is not just about soaking in each other’s intellectual andemotional effluence (though that has its advantages too), it’s aboutknowing what’s going on around you so that you can constantly align,connect, consider and matter. The flip side of transparency is“impact.” With the right kind of transparency, i can see what is goingon, and understand the impact that my best work makes. I can see who andhow I help. That matters. 3. Mutual DependenceWhenwe work together as a team, we help unpack each other’s intellectualboxes, we refine one another’s ideas and discover new ones. We improveeach other. We build a continually improving, communal memory,experience and insight (to riff on a William Gibson quote). Members ofsuch a team take ownership of their responsibilities seriously, butinvite and relish in the fact that they can rely on their colleagues tohelp them work through sticking points and make their best work better. Acollaborative environment helps sustain energy, focus, and purpose. Butto get here, you must be aligned, you must have a mutual respect thatleads to mutual compassion and curiosity that makes it fun to airchallenges, problems and failure and a joy to bash and hash it outtogether. If you do not have a “culture” of mutual dependence atwork, technology will not change that fact. Generally this is aboutaligning around common goals, and offering one another respect as aconduit to trust, which enables you to do what teams do best — amplifystrengths and minimize weaknesses. If you’ve ever been a part of thatteam, you know. 4. LeadershipSome socialmedia-ites believe that in the future, organizations will be purelyemergent and collaborative, with no leadership required. I am not ofthat school — though certainly the nature of leadership will change. Leadershipmatters, and there are two things that great leaders do 1) communicatewithout ceasing (leading to that transparency and inclusion thing) and2) listen without ceasing by asking lots of questions. Dear leader, ifyou aren’t both sharing your vision and listening to your workforce,then there is at least an organization’s worth of people who think youare a fool. This perpetual telling and listening looks like a subtle anddynamic balance between confidence and humility. There is a thirdthing, and that is that you must be authentic. The human nose candetect the scent of patronizing palaver in micro-parts per million.

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3 Perspectives on Leveraging DAM to Manage Work in Progress

See ConceptShare Blog. 3 Perspectives on Leveraging DAM to Manage Work in Progress ConceptSharehas worked with over 100 enterprise marketing and creative servicesteams. By peering over their shoulders we have acquired a deepunderstanding of their work in progress (WIP) process, which theydescribe as moving from “I need an asset” to “I have an asset.” WIP is aprocess with a broad range of stakeholders working together to route,review and make decisions on work in progress. Overthe past twenty-four months WIP has become top of mind for marketers,creative teams and Digital Asset Management (DAM) system owners.Marketers and creative teams are demanding a solution that is designed,developed and optimized for managing the WIP process. As a result, theyare asking, “Can our DAM system support the WIP process?” Whatorganizations have determined is that there is no single, perfectsolution to manage WIP. Instead, the solution is a moving target basedon an organization’s current goals with respect to workflow, availabletechnology and process maturity. Manyof the organizations we work with are what we refer to as DAM-centric,investing a significant amount of time and resources into a DAM system.The DAM system is often thought of as an enabling or foundationaltechnology that can and should support all phases of an asset’slifecycle. We have observedDAM-centric organizations work through three common options beforeselecting the option that will best support WIP. Below we have outlinedthe three options we most often see enterprises consider, how theoptions meet their requirements, and our observations on why they selectone option over the others. Option #1: Use a DAM System to Manage WIP Requirements We want a single system that manages the entire lifecycle of an asset Yes We want a system (with functionality, UI, UX) that is designed and optimized for WIP No We consider WIP to be a critical process requiring support and investment No We are committed to developing a strong WIP process No Our Observation Wesee organizations adopt this option when they already have a DAM systemin place. They want to leverage their investment to deliver support forWIP to benefit from having a single system for managing the entireasset lifecycle. Organizations that choose this option don’t deliverfunctionality that is becoming a standard expectation for users involvedin the WIP process, such as the ability to annotate an asset tocommunicate clear and actionable feedback. DAM systems also have a UI/UXthat was designed for storage and distribution. For the vast number ofnon-technical users involved in the WIP process, the DAM system’s UI/UXcan complicate and slow down the overall process. Option #2: Use Two Systems Operating Independently Requirements We want one system that manages the entire lifecycle of an asset No We want a system (with functionality, UI, UX) that is designed and optimized for WIP Yes We consider WIP to be a critical process requiring support and investment Yes We are committed to developing strong WIP processes Yes Our Observation Wesee organizations adopt this option when they are seeking to deploy a“best of breed” WIP solution. WIP solutions are designed, developed andoptimized for enterprise marketing departments and agency account teamsto route, review and approve WIP. These solutions are designed for teamsthat have a narrow window of time to capture stakeholder input, reactto change requests and deliver approved assets. The benefit of thisoption is that organizations deliver functionality that is becoming astandard expectation for users involved in WIP, such as the ability toannotate an asset to communicate clear and actionable feedback. Equallyimportant these systems have a UI/UX that was designed for WIP and thebroad range of users involved in this process. However, organizations give up the benefits of having a single system thatmanages the entire asset lifecycle. By using two stand-alone systems,organizations risk creating information silos and disconnectedworkflows. Based on our observations, these organizations usuallyresolve this issue by integrating their DAM and WIP systems. Option #3: Use Two Systems Operating Interdependently Requirements We want one system that manages the entire lifecycle of an asset Yes We want a system (with functionality, UI, UX) that is designed and optimized for WIP Yes We consider WIP to be a critical process requiring support and investment Yes We are committed to developing strong WIP processes Yes Our Observation Wesee organizations adopt this option when they are seeking to deploy a“best of breed” WIP solution and tightly integrate it with their DAMsystem. These organizations believe that users should be able to work inapplications designed for their role or current task, and thatinformation and workflows should be synced across their DAM and WIPsystems. The benefit of this option is that organizations deliverfunctionality that is becoming a standard expectation for users involvedin WIP, such as the ability to annotate an asset to communicate clearand actionable feedback. Equally important these systems have a UI/UXthat was designed for WIP and the broad range of users involved in thisprocess. Organizations benefit from having a single, integrated systemthat manages the entire asset lifecycle.

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Information does matter

In recent years there have been manyhorror stories about the mismanagement of information, whether itpertains to personal, private or public data in the form of lostlaptops, discs, files and briefcases etc. How should information bemanaged? Could anything have been done to avoid the loss or minimise therisk of human error? Is there an easy answer? The HM Government released a whitepaper entitled“Information Matters: Building Governments Capability in ManagingKnowledge and Information” this highlights an extension of‘Transformational Government into data, information and knowledgemanagement where there is a need for best practice policy supported bytechnology’. Ithas been said before that this is the century or age of information.More information is being created every day, this in turn means thatmore information is being stored every day too. Businesses, Services,Governments and other Organisations all need this ‘lifeblood’ ofinformation to be accessible, useable, safe and accountable. Thegovernment is committed to addressing specific aspects of informationmanagement and information security (BS10012 and BS27001). This is allvery well, but having just information management on its own is notenough. Good information management needs to be aligned with goodknowledge management. Well, what use is information if it is not usedcorrectly? If you go to an ATM to withdraw money, you expect that thebank has used the information about you correctly, to ensure that youget your money from the correct account when you need it. But what ifthis information was not managed properly and you were abroad andneeding to access your funds and were unable to? This is a simplescenario but think about how information is used when you renew your cartax online, at passport control or to ensure you have the correct taxcode etc. It is not just about having the information but using iteffectively. Recently Knowledge Management and Information Managementhave been formally recognised as functions of government, in the sameway that finance, IT and communications are. With more and moreinformation being created, how long should you keep certain pieces ofinformation before it loses its usefulness or becomes dangerous? Whodecides what parameters are set for this? How does this impact on dataprotection laws? These are just a few of the many important questionsraised. Each organisation will have differing requirements on thismatter. There are guidelines online for organisations which help them tomeet the necessary regulations required by law, but you still need tomanage this effectively. So what do Governments and Businessesneed to do in order to deploy an effective information management andknowledge management strategy? The government, here in the UK, has setout guidelines highlighted in their Information Matters whitepaper and have organised a committee to help manage this. Many businesseshave done the same, but some are not seeing the bigger picture yet.People are talking about big data and the age of information but whatare they doing about it? Many of their current systems andprocess have been in place for many years and a lot of the informationis paper based. Technology is moving forward at an exponential rate,particularly with smart phones and tablet devices. Many businessprocesses nowadays are handled electronically with little or no actualpaperwork involved, but how is this information tracked and handled?Electronic document and records management software (EDRMS) appears tobe the answer. Many vendors will offer this at a departmental level orin some cases at enterprise level. Having an EDRMS system in place willensure that your business or government department meets the necessarylegislations and ensure that you have an effective informationmanagement strategy. However, there is a relatively new approach called Enterprise Information Management(EIM). In effect what EIM does is brings structure to the unstructured by unleashing the power of information to the organisation. With the growth of information coupled with the myriad of differentformats,only one organisation is standing up to be the leader in thisfield,with the goal of becoming recognised as the #1 EIM vendor. This organisation is already demonstrating leadership, according toanalystsGartner and Forrester, and is well on its way to being leaderin allfive pillars of EIM, namely Enterprise Content Management (ECM), Business Process Management (BPM), Customer Experience Management(CEM),Information Exchange and Discovery. If I were a CIO of a majororganisation or government department, I know full well what I would bedoing. I would contact my local OpenText office and ask for guidance. By acting now, I would hope to avoid any mishapsor issues around information management, compliance and legislationwithin my organisation.

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How safe is your company’s social media?

A guest post written by our own Matthew Mullerworth. Thisweek we saw a cyber-attack on US Fast-food giant, Burger King. For overan hour their Twitter profile resembled a McDonald’s advert. Duringthat time, it posted comments about why it had been bought by theirrivals, along with numerous racial and obscene tweets. This goes to showthat no organisation is immune to a cyber-attack. Criminals, andterrorists alike, target businesses with the goal of disruption, thebigger the better. With cyber-attacks they often aim for the softunderbelly of an inexperienced person within that organisation. This canbe in the form of a simple email purporting to be from a colleagueasking the recipient to click on a link or open an attachment. This iswhat experts are calling “spear-phishing”. Chances are that this simpleaction can result in a virus that attacks the computer in question andsubsequently infects the rest of the company. This gives the criminalsaccess to do their thing and cause disruption. All companies havesensitive information, some more than others. These could includegovernmental departments, emergency services, pharmaceutical companiesand law firms. Many have taken steps and have done all they can toprevent this from happening. All organisations should have InformationSecurity teams who monitor, legislate and educate staff to be aware ofany potential dangers. In the UK, ISO27001 is the standard that most adhere to. Alsomore recently, Content Management and Information Managementtechnologies are being used to offer an improved level of access andsecurity to the data held within an organisation. Information Security is one topic being discussed at OpenText EIM Days this year. In the UK it is being held at Twickenham RFU Stadium on 16-17 April 2013. OpenText has a wealth of experience in this area globally, working with many governments and businesses alike. Please contact your local office to learn more and experience true information security for yourselves. Matthew is a key member of our UK Account Development Team. He is a keen marketer and amateur blogger/photographer.Heis currently supporting the OpenText UK Public Sector Sales Team to bethought-leaders in the EIM space through strategic & specific ideasand campaigns.

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Collaboration Isn’t Working: What We Have Here is a Chasm

This is a cmswire cross-post. What we have ourselves here is a chasm. Collaboration isn’t breaking out all over. Dear Colleagues: Canyou feel it? It’s the subtle loosening of gravity’s pull as we pause atthe peak of the hype apex before we thunder down into the trough ofdisillusionment (with apologies to Gartner). Social collaboration isn’tworking very well, but must we go gently into that good night? Some of the reasons we’re hitting the near edge of this “chasm” we’ve known and predicted from the beginning. Thisis a paradigm shift as fundamental as any the modern workforce orcapitalism has ever seen. More significant than the PC, the internet andthe IT department combined. More significant than globalization. It’sabout retreating from command and control practices designed to make theENGINE of capitalism (and government and war) purr, to a collaborativeone which activates the full capabilities of the participants andnetworks them in a way that amplifies and accelerates action. It’sabout changing from a daily grind of covering our individual andcollective heinies to one where we are joined in the intellectual,emotional and emergent pursuit of “better.” Of mission and service. Ok— so that’s pretty hard, we have established but few ground rules, andit looks like we’ll wander another 10 or 20 years or so in the deserttill it’s really as true as we’d like to to be, but it does seeminevitable, and so it is. But we could speed it along with more rigorousresearch and learning. We need to stop trying to ferret out bits ofgood news and start ferreting out learning. In other words, weneed to take our own advice about facing both good and bad news withequanimity and an authentic learning orientation. But there’sanother angle to this and its really, really bothering me. Adoption. Allthe 68,000 vendors in the space (including my employer, OpenText) havesettled on streams and digital workspaces as the definition of socialcollaboration technology — with some allowance for variance in quality,focus and features. And now we’re all lecturing on about adoption. There are several things that are bothering me about that. First.The language we’re hearing about adoption is eerily similar to thelanguage we heard about every other enterprise IT paradigm that socialcollaboration is supposedly saving us from. “People don’t get it, weneed change management and training and… ” And maybe that’s alltrue. But I know that I have scoffed at those foolish 1990’s KM peoplewho stuck to their guns and soldiered on in spite of the fact that whatthey were doing clearly wasn’t working — though the value propositionwas real, vital and clear. I have said the same thing about other ITsystems of yore. Can we now smugly believe that we are somehowmore enlightened than others because we “get it”? If we’re so awesome,why isn’t this working? Why doesn’t everyone “get it” and why are wehaving such a hard time with adoption? I know, I know, humanbehavior, culture and all that. But we adopted cell phones as fast asthey could make em. Just sayin’. Some of the change management stuff isreal, true and urgent, and some of it is just denial. We do not want tobelieve that maybe we aren’t right. But we aren’t. Second.So we’ve been pushing this techno philosophy pretty hard for three orfive years, and as a Gartner analyst recently observed in a meeting,it’s no longer a new industry. And what have we learned? We have abunch of people like me, many better than me, lecturing on what shouldbe and could be, but where’s the “what is”? I want a more rigorous bodyof learning out of the last five years. We deserve it and we need it tocontinue to be leaders in the reinvention of work. I know that there isan Amazon’s worth of books and papers out there, but it’s not enough. Yet. Wehave some clear wins. The majority of fortune 1000 businesses are usingsome form of social media to communicate internally as well asexternally. Pockets of success are found within many companies and a feworganizations are entirely transformed. Perhaps more new organizationsare being formed after the new model rather than the old. In theface of a mountain of evidence that something isn’t working as well aswe hoped, is “try harder” a good strategy? Are we asking the hardquestions of ourselves that could help us tell the difference? Like —whydo people like email so darn much in spite of the fact that its killingthem and makes their life more difficult in both the long and the shortterm. Are we wrong to ignore it? To insist that “email is dead, usethis instead”? Why do teams fail to act the way we think theywill? Are we oversimplifying the notion of team? What aboutorganizations? Where is the deeper insight on the relationship betweenteams and organizations? Why isn’t a sophisticated vocabulary breakingout? Why do we not yet have 100 words for different kinds ofcollaboration and teams, as expert in it as we think Eskimos are aboutsnow? What is the difference between an intranet, a community and ateam? I don’t want a tweetchat full of clever answers, I want clarity — and so do you. So— yes, the paradigm shift will take a generation to turn over. But wehave not yet come close to our full measure of duty as techno-innovatorsto drive it. I would like to toss out some themes where I think we haveimportant questions to ask, things to learn. Maybe these are on theright track, maybe not, maybe its the wrong question entirely. But weneed to start asking questions and stop searching — exclusively — forcrumbs of corroborating evidence and data, and start looking at theentire body of information. In other words, we need to step backfrom building business cases — though they are still important and valid— and put more emphasis on building our knowledge. Editor’s Note: Deb will be speaking on this topic at Social Media Week NYC on Feb 21 at 2pm Themes and VariationsThese are some of the themes where I want to see harder questions asked. What are your questions? 1. The organizationFirst— the organization, the intranet and collaborative teams are NOT thesame thing. The relationship among and between these things needsserious scrutiny. We’re beginning to see serious and rigorousstudy of public social networks in use for marketing, crisis management, etc., but that’s a bit easier — it’s all happening out in public, so wecan see it and analyze it, thanks to the Twitter API. It’s a bit harderto go into private enterprise systems and have a look (with someobvious and disturbing exceptions). 2. Connecting the dotsSecond— streams are nice. I adore Twitter. I adore our internal corporatetools that are similar to it. And here we’ve seen great adoption. We’veturned our org into a giant chat room: an extension of Instant messengeror chat for all. There’s benefit in that. Ambient awareness has huge benefits and is one of the key elements in making remote work work. But that’s not a“wirearchy,”it does not make work visible in an actionable way, it does not cementteam bonds, it connects only a modest set of dots, it is, in short,inadequate to change how we work, though it’s a nice addition. We needto build the semantic, statistical, psycho-social and otherwise toolsthat goose the gods of serendipity. 3. CollaborationSeveral years ago, I came up with a definition of collaboration that focused on three key ideas: creation, connection and compounding. I also observed that great teams shared four basic traits — they had ashared sense of mission, they respected one another, they trusted oneanother and they were committed to achieving excellence. We’ve since learned that very effective teamshave great communications — and very importantly — members are more orless equal in the amount they contribute. No divas, no wallflowers. Butwe’re only seeing whispers of real actionable insight into how tocontrive (or “cast”) these magically great teams. Leadership, yes,balance and matching of people — yeah, we sorta kinda know we have to dothat, but few of us know how. How is most collaboration achieved?What is the type, volume and velocity of information that needs to beexchanged? Is this the same of variable by team? By task? By… what? Howcan teams connect to the whole and vice versa?

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