Customer Experience Management

OpenText Celebrates Media Launch in Hollywood Style

The latest release of OpenText’s industry-leading Digital Asset Management Platform was celebrated in style at the W Hollywood Hotel in January. The event was attended by more than 100 people from the Media Industry as well as other OpenText customers. Nearly all of the major media companies were there, including 20th Century Fox, Disney, Paramount, Technicolor, Hasbro, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and many more. The celebration was kicked off with some special Hollywood luminaries as guest speakers – Kristin Kennedy, founder of Createasphere; Flint Dille, a technologist, transmediologist, writer, gamer and more; and Jonathan Taplin, Producer, Documentary Maker and Professor from Annenberg School for Communications at USC. The crowd was engaged with the speaker’s insights on some the trends as well as threats in the media industry, and how the value of IP and digital assets plays across different generations. The event capped a tremendous effort by the Media Management engineering and product teams to develop the latest release in an accelerated timeframe. Their efforts to redesign the User Interface, REST API extensions and numerous added features validates the market leading position Media Management has in the DAM industry. And a special thanks to our sponsors for helping to the make the event a huge success. Thanks to Accenture, Deloitte, OnPrem Solutions and Optima Consulting. What a perfect way to start out the year. Thanks to everyone for making this such a stellar kick-off and we are looking forward to an exceptionally bright future for OpenText Media Management.

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Today’s Media Management

The average 14-year-old kid will probably create more media by the time I finish this post than I will this year. It’s so simple to create and so necessary to communicate with these days. And therein lies the problem: The technology to create, contribute, and consume rich media has outpaced our ability to manage it. In today’s hyper-digital environment, where time is of the essence and the experience is what sells, your customers, partners, and buyers want video, pictures, and information in real-time—synchronized and delivered consistently to users on the platforms and devices they choose. So business , marketing, and competitive demands are pushing Digital Asset Management (DAM) and the digital supply chain beyond traditional approaches. We just can’t keep up using traditional methods! With multiple systems and applications trying to manage and control all these assets, things are falling through the cracks. Missing content. Missed opportunities. Lost productivity. Sigh… A Platform for Digital Asset Management OpenText Media Management is a DAM pioneer . (That’s funny every time!) From creation to consumption, we help you manage all your video, images, and rich media for the entire enterprise in one place. With a powerful yet simple-to-use interface, our solutions help people find what they need, share, collaborate, and use digital assets anywhere for richer, more effective communication in marketing, sales, and throughout the organization. Media Management makes it so easy to get the right content and rich experiences to users on the platforms and devices they choose. What’s new in Media Management? A completely redesigned user experience replaces the Flash UI with a simple yet powerful HTML5 user interface. This is much more than just a DAM—now you have unparalleled control and access to all your digital media content. The redesigned user experience in Media Management puts the digital content you want at your fingertips. Whether your typing or swiping, the simple and intuitive user interface makes your job easier. In Media Management, the HTML5 interface and responsive design reduces complexity and unnecessary clutter to find what you need, share data, collaborate on projects, and use digital assets anywhere, on any screen, including mobile and touch-enabled. There! Now how much rich media do you think that kid created?

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Join Santa Claus on his Journey to the Digital First World!

When OpenText acquired GXS in January 2014, little did the company know that they would also be acquiring a customer widely regarded as having one of the most secretive businesses in the world. Over the years, many companies have decided to outsource the management of their B2B environment and in 2008, GXS signed a Managed Services contract with its most high profile customer, Santa Claus Enterprises in the North Pole. Over the years I have kept in close contact with this particular customer as they have been a shining example of how to deploy the full portfolio of B2B solutions from OpenText. Each year, just before Santa’s busiest period, I have provided a summary of the enhancements to their B2B environment. The evolution of Santa’s B2B environment is documented via the blogs below, feel free to take a look through as they will also provide some interesting insights into what it takes to deliver millions of Christmas presents on just one night of the year. 2013 – Santa deploys the Internet of Things across his North Pole Operations 2012 – Santa begins to evaluate the information flowing across SantaNet and implements a Big Data strategy 2011 – OpenText Active Community gets rolled out across Santa’s trading partner community to improve day to day collaboration across his Present Delivery Network and he also gets nominated for B2B Heroes award 2010 – Santa evaluates how cloud computing and mobile devices could improve North Pole operations 2009 – Santa completes deployment of OpenText Managed Services and begins to embrace social media tools 2008 – OpenText Managed Services chosen to support Santa’s new B2B hub, OpenText Intelligent Web Forms deployed to create SantaNet Santa’s little helpers, namely his army of elves, were asked by Santa to review the portfolio of Enterprise Information Management (EIM) solutions from OpenText to see where further benefits could be made by automating manual business processes and digitising the remainder of his business operations. Many companies are embarking on a digital journey to improve the way in which different departments manage and get access to their corporate information. In fact ‘Digital Transformation’ projects are high on the agenda of many CIOs around the world at the moment and OpenText is in a unique position to provide a one stop shop to transform companies into a digital business. In August I received an email from Sonja Lundström, Santa’s trusted advisor and executive assistant, inviting me to go up to the North Pole to provide a digital business briefing for Santa and his executive board. Santa’s board members comprise of senior executives from some of the world’s leading toy manufacturers including Mattel, Hasbro and Lego. As with previous trips up to the North Pole, I was asked to check in at the Elf Air desk at a secret terminal at Schipol Airport just outside Amsterdam. This year I had the privilege of travelling on one of Santa’s new Airbus A380’s, a converted passenger plane that allows Santa, when required, to expedite the shipment of thousands of parcels to any one of his Present Distribution Hubs located in strategic locations around the world. The plane I travelled on, call sign ELF020, was one of a fleet of ten aircraft that Santa had chartered for the 2014 holiday season. 16 hours after leaving the UK I was checking into the North Pole Ice Hotel, a stone’s throw from the entrance to Santa’s primary toy manufacturing and distribution facility. I decided to get an early night as I knew the following day would be quite busy! The next day I walked across to Santa’s factory and I was whisked up to the executive briefing centre where I was introduced to Santa’s board members. Five minutes later and the main man himself walked through the frosted glass doors to the board room. Following introductions, Santa’s Chief Elf Information Officer provided an update on their current IT and B2B related projects. I have documented many of these projects quite extensively in the earlier articles which I listed at the beginning of this blog. Needless to say I was very impressed by the ROI that Santa had obtained by deploying OpenText Managed Services. Santa’s core B2B platform, the Present Delivery Network (shown above), processes billions of transactions each year and over the last five years, Santa had seen a 40% growth in new present orders through SantaNet, a web form based toy ordering environment that our company setup in 2008. The growth in new orders had come from the so called omni-channel effect with children placing toy orders through PCs, mobiles and tablet based devices. In addition to deploying a world leading B2B platform, Santa’s team rolled out their ‘Internet of Santa’s Things’ infrastructure, a high profile initiative to provide improved visibility across Santa’s Present Delivery Network. The Internet of Things has become one of the most talked about disruptive digital technologies of 2014, and Santa had no concerns about deploying his IoST environment and he certainly proved to be a digital trail blazer in this particular area. In addition, Santa had embraced a number of other disruptive technologies during 2014. Last year I discussed how Santa’s elves were using Google Glass in their warehouses to improve their toy pick rates. In addition to Glass, Santa had tested some other high profile disruptive technologies. A few years ago Santa invited Steve Jobs to his factory and following lengthy discussions Santa Claus Enterprises became a leading member of Apple’s beta test program. As soon as the early iWatch wearable devices were revealed to the world’s media in 2014, Apple despatched a shipment of iWatches for every elf in the factory. These came pre-loaded with a number of festive mobile apps to help improve the day to day efficiency of Santa’s team of elves. 3D printing was rolled out across Santa’s production department, not just for manufacturing proof of concept toy designs but to build scale models of new sleigh designs that would then be refined in Santa’s onsite wind tunnel. Sleigh research budgets have increased significantly over the years and 3D printing was helping to develop the most aerodynamically refined sleigh in the world. The final area of digital disruption that Santa embraced in 2014 was advanced robotics. Santa had heard that Foxconn, a leading contract manufacturer to Apple, was deploying up to a million ‘Foxbots’ across their manufacturing operations. Santa decided that he wanted to deploy ‘Elfbots’ to bring similar efficiencies to his own production operations. Santa is now working with Andy Rubin, head of Google’s newly formed robotics division, to define a development plan for his network of 2,000 Elfbots. Santa has done a great job of ensuring that he can seamlessly connect with the little children around the world. So in many ways Santa’s operations were already significantly digitally enabled but now that GXS had been acquired by OpenText there was scope for the deployment of further digital information tools. After all, many of the new disruptive technologies such as connected IoST devices were producing high volumes of unstructured data that would need to be archived, analysed and acted upon as required. After the CEIO had provided his updates it was time for me to take to the floor. I provided Santa and the board with a high level introduction to OpenText and they were very impressed with the joint customer base and the opportunities available to embrace new Enterprise Information Management solutions. Even though Santa had consolidated many back end business systems, such as his Elf Resources Platform (ERP), there were still many different information silos located within the various departments of his operations. Just finding the right information at the right time proved to be a challenge on occasions. To gain further efficiencies across Santa’s operations it would be important to ensure that all departments could feed off of a centralised digital information hub. This hub would be accessible any time, any place or anywhere, useful considering the global nature and complexity of Santa’s operations. OpenText solutions are divided across five key ‘pillars’, shown by way of the chart below, Santa’s B2B solutions are under the Information Exchange pillar. Before I had even explained each of the five solution pillars, Santa could immediately see that there was a significant opportunity to increase the footprint of OpenText solutions across his business. Santa said that he would like OpenText to become his trusted guide during his journey into the digital first world. But first he wanted me to highlight how OpenText could manage different types of information from the key stages of a toy’s lifecycle. I created the chart below to help illustrate some of the key process stages across Santa’s manufacturing operations. I have also overlaid, where appropriate the five key solution pillars as they apply to each stage of the lifecycle of a toy (which in reality could represent any manufactured product). Now I could go into detail around how OpenText can help manage information across each of these twelve process steps, but for the purposes of this article, let me just expand on five of these. Toy Design & Engineering – At this phase of a toy’s lifecycle, any information associated with the design of a toy will need to be centrally managed and archived in an Enterprise Content Management (ECM) solution. Typical files managed at this stage include 3D CADCAM models, 3D printer files, 2D drawings, production related information and high quality rendered images and 3D animations. A Digital Asset Management solution from OpenText would allow Santa’s marketing elves and outside PR agencies to review and download high quality rendered images and videos for use in promotional materials. Information Exchange (IX), solutions such as Managed File Transfer, allows Santa’s design elves to send large file size design information anywhere across the external enterprise, including contract manufacturers. Procurement / Supplier Onboarding – This is part of the toy’s lifecycle that GXS, now Information Exchange, has been supporting over the past few years, from on-boarding suppliers and ensuring they can exchange B2B transactions electronically to providing back end integration to Santa’s ERP platform. In addition, it is important for a procurement team to work collaboratively with their suppliers and all proposal, contract and contact information will need to be centrally managed. The procurement elves may need to undertake some form of Governance, Risk and Compliance (GRC) assessments across their trading partner community. The area of GRC is becoming an increasingly important area for many companies and new regulations such as conflict minerals compliance needs to be adhered to and managed in an effective way. Just as an aside, Santa takes Corporate Social Responsibility really seriously, so much so that he would like to setup an Elf Information Management System (EIMS) to help with the day to day management of his elves and ensure the quality of their welfare whilst working in the toy factory. Plant Maintenance and Asset Management – Santa has an army of elves conducting proactive maintenance on shop floor related manufacturing and assembly equipment. Given the tight production schedule that Santa has each year, his elves ideally need quick access to maintenance and machine test procedures, 2D maintenance drawings and equipment test and compliance certificates. Even ensuring that Santa’s elves adhere to the latest Elf and Safety procedures has become a challenge over the years. The elves already have access to ruggedized tablet devices for use on the shop floor. Using Appworks, OpenText’s mobile app development platform, Santa’s elves would be able to get remote access to any information archived in the central content management system. In addition, the elves need to follow a standard process for maintaining each piece of equipment and OpenText’s Business Process Management (BPM) solution would be able to more effectively manage all the process steps involved with maintaining Santa’s production equipment. Can you imagine what would happen on the 24th December each year if the toy production lines are halted due to a malfunctioning assembly robot? Online Customer Experience – The SantaNet portal had worked well over the years and allowed the little children of the world to login to a portal and submit their present wish lists! At this stage of the toy’s lifecycle, various web related assets will need to be created and managed, eg product brochures, toy promotion videos and animations will need to be accessed by different elves across the extended enterprise and outside video production agencies. OpenText Customer Experience Management (CEM) solutions are ideal for this purpose. Given the connected nature of today’s children, Santa would be able to setup a best in class ‘Young Person Experience Management’ offering that would leverage OpenText’s Web Experience Management offering. In addition, all other internal websites used by his elves could be upgraded with the latest portal technologies offered by OpenText. Recalls and Warranty Repair – The final stage of a toy’s lifecycle relates to the potential recall or repair of toys. Unfortunately not every toy delivered via the chimney makes it safely down to the fireplace and breakages can occur. Santa established a toy repair and recall centre ten years ago however many of the processes used to recover broken toys from the world’s children are quite lengthy and prone to delays due to the amount of manual paperwork that needs to be processed. In addition to repairs, sometimes toys have to be recalled, perhaps due to poor quality workmanship by Santa’s elves. Whether repairing broken toys or recalling faulty toys, Santa’s elves could significantly improve operational efficiencies by deploying OpenText’s Business Process Management (BPM) solution. BPM will ensure that every toy that needs to be repaired or recalled follows a strict series of process steps. This ensures that a consistent and repeatable repair/recall process can be established and this helps to improve Child Satisfaction Levels, a key metric used by Santa to keep the world’s children happy with their toys. In addition to providing an overview of these five solution areas, I explained to Santa that OpenText was looking at how the different pillar solutions could be integrated together. I also showed a new fast moving video which helps to describe the OpenText Cloud. To wrap up my presentation to Santa and the board I also discussed new development areas and highlighted a recent announcement concerning OpenText’s intention to acquire the business intelligence company, Actuate. Last year when I visited Santa Claus Enterprises HQ, I was shown the latest beta version of SantaPad, a Big Data analytics engine for processing toy consumption trends across the little boys and girls of the world. Actuate could potentially provide the business intelligence platform to significantly improve the big data analytics capabilities across Santa’s operations. Santa was so excited by this news that he requested a briefing of Actuate’s capabilities, as and when it was convenient for OpenText to do so. We had just gone over our two hour presentation slot with Santa and I decided to summarise how OpenText helps businesses move to a 100% digital business. Firstly OpenText can help to Simplify Santa’s back end platforms to manage enterprise wide business information, irrespective of which application the information was originally created in. Secondly, OpenText can help to Transform information from literally any format to another and ensure that digital information can be exchanged both internally across the elf community and externally across third party contract manufacturers and logistics providers. Thirdly, OpenText can help to Accelerate the adoption of digital technologies, which would allow faster business decisions to be made. Santa’s operations would ultimately become more responsive to changing consumer demand and increased competition from new emerging toy markets. This brought our meeting to a close and I had a number of actions to follow up on with my colleagues back at OpenText! In closing, Santa wished OpenText and our global customers Season’s Greetings and Happy New Year and he said he was looking forward to working closely with OpenText during 2015 and beyond. So it just leaves me to say season’s greetings and best of luck for 2015!  

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Experience Matters in Omni-Channel Commerce

[This article was also published in CMS Wire.] Experience matters in Omni-Channel Commerce, both the Customer Experience and the software ecosystem that supports a buyer’s journey from initial discovery to customer advocate. Just as shoppers see products on display in physical stores, digital experiences have to provide relevant content and compelling interactions to convert browsing to buying. Connected consumers expect convenience and flexibility across channels whether brick and mortar, catalog, print, in-store kiosks, web, mobile and social platforms. Nothing frustrates customers more than dead-end, can’t get there from here experiences. And second chances are rare. Omni-channel commerce is a complex ecosystem. It involves many interrelated platforms, components and capabilities such as Web Content Management, eCommerce, Digital Asset Management, product catalog, product information, merchandising, inventory, pricing, promotion, order, fulfillment, reporting, analytics and more. Unfortunately, many organizations have disconnected, legacy silos and struggle to bridge the customer engagement, customer experience side with back office and transaction management. Digital Asset Management is one of the key platforms in the ecosystem, along with eCommerce and WCM. In planning for a successful Omni-Channel Commerce initiative do not assume that DAM will be taken care of within these other platforms. DAM Infrastructure DAM serves as a core infrastructure underlying eCommerce, WCM, PIM and product catalogs. With an ever-growing pool of images, photos, audio and video to support commerce, digital assets should be synchronized with back office transaction management and the customer experience presentation. Mature and extensible DAM platforms provide integration with eCommerce and WCM to automate delivery of rich media in the proper format and size, across multiple channels driven by either the WCM or an eCommerce system. Whether serving up digital assets for the eCommerce site, public or partner catalogs, internal or external users, assets should all be sourced from a common repository – providing collaboration and brand consistency. Other important capabilities include automated synchronization and search capabilities within other platforms, localization and security. DAM capabilities increase productivity by reducing time spent searching for assets and automating repetitive tasks to “media-enable” eCommerce and the entire organization. Omni-Channel vs. Multi-Channel Rather than managing separate customer experiences through various channels as in a multi-channel strategy, Omni-channel strategy is customer-centric. It is an immersive, uninterrupted and device agnostic experience across channels that drives engagement, loyalty and transactions. The customer is at the center. It’s about the brand, product or service not the channel. DAM provides the core enterprise infrastructure, key platform components and capabilities supporting and enhancing the omni-channel ecosystem with the efficiencies of create once, publish everywhere, to repurpose, re-express, reuse, and re-create digital content for compelling customer experiences. Product owners and brand managers can collaborate, easily find and manage assets from a single library, synchronized and integrated with the other native platforms. You can find out more about DAM in this recent CMS Wire article. Go Omni-Channel Omni-channel Commerce meets customer expectations with consistent and connected experiences across all channels. This means consistency in experience as well as context and connected to information as well as continuity across channels and customer insight. Competition for customers is fierce and omni-channel commerce can be a major differentiator. As you plan your strategy, remember that experience matters.

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A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

Imagine Facebook without selfies, Instagram without videos or Amazon without product images. You can’t, can you? In this digital-first world we live in, data overload is a menacing reality, and a picture is not just “worth a thousand words” … it is priceless. The right visual element can attract our attention, make complex concepts clearer and assist in our decision making process. Here are three important business tasks where I think the right visuals make all the difference. Bringing Big Data to Life As big data becomes increasingly important to how we do business and serve our customers, the science of visualizing information has also become elevated. This is not a new notion. Edward R. Tufte, a statistician and professor emeritus at Yale University is a pioneer in the discipline. His landmark 1983 book, “The Visual Display of Quantitative Information,” provides guidance on successful information design and visualization. Tufte gave us six fundamental principles of analytical design that are timeless and translate from paper to the digital world: Show comparisons, contrasts, differences. Show causality, mechanism, explanation, systematic structure. Show multivariate data; that is, show more than 1 or 2 variables. Completely integrate words, numbers, images, diagrams. Thoroughly describe the evidence. Provide a detailed title, indicate the authors and sponsors, document the data sources, show complete measurement scales, point out relevant issues. Analytical presentations ultimately stand or fall depending on the quality, relevance and integrity of their content. Tufte also gave us a cool vocabulary for recognizing and discussing bad design: terms like chartjunk (interior graphic decoration that generates a lot of ink but does not tell the viewer anything new) and lie factor (numbers physically appearing on the surface of the graphic that are not directly proportional to the quantities represented). Tufte’s innovative ideas like sparklines are used to this day as a condensed and elegant way to present trends and variation embedded directly in text. For example: The Dow Jones index for February 7, 2006 In addition, Tufte figures heavily in the history of today’s infographic. As a graphic visual representation of knowledge that presents complex data quickly and clearly, an infographic can enhance understanding by improving our ability to see information patterns and trends.While infographics are a current popular embodiment of Tufte’s principles of analytic design, they have an interesting history of their own that includes, but also predates his work. A famous infographic milestone occurred in 1857 when English nurse Florence Nightingale used information graphics to persuade Queen Victoria to improve conditions in military hospitals. She used a Coxcomb chart, a combination of stacked bar and pie charts, depicting the number and causes of deaths during each month of the Crimean War.Once you see the chart, the picture makes it clear that the Russians were a minor enemy: the real enemies were cholera, typhus and dysentery. Another big step in the story of infographics was taken in 1931, when Harry Beck created the first map of the London Tube showing only lines to depict public transit routes and stations. This was an important development, because it moved visual diagrams into everyday life. Over the past several years infographics have taken off and their use by marketers is closing in on a saturation point. However, when done well, they remain an extremely useful means of visualization. As the Best Infographics of 2014 (so far) points out, “Humans have short attention spans and, let’s face it, the internet is cluttered. To stand out, boost engagement, and increase shareability, many marketers have turned to visual content — especially infographics.” While my favorite infographics typically are the vertical industry ones like Governments are Going Digital, Life Sciences 2014 Outlook, Are You a Connected Bank and Energy Sector Challenges in Asset Information Management, the infographic I like the best from the Best of 2014 list is “Your Brain on Beer vs. Coffee” — just because I do. Solving Problems Tufte declared that “the purpose of an evidence presentation is to assist thinking.” In 2003 he shared his thoughts on the now omnipresent business presentation tool in his article, PowerPoint is Evil. His conclusion blames the person rather than the technology: PowerPoint is a competent slide manager and projector. But rather than supplementing a presentation, it has become a substitute for it. Such misuse ignores the most important rule of speaking: Respect your audience.” Swedish physician and statistician Hans Rosling offers a more positive view of presentation technology and presenter style. His 2006 TED talk, “The best stats you’ve ever seen,” debunked myths about the so-called “developing world” and has been viewed by millions. Rosling transformed dry statistics into an illuminating form of entertainment, earning him a spot on Time magazine’s 2012 100 most influential people list. The talk used animated graphics created with Gapminder Foundation’s Trendalyzer software. Animated scatterplots had been done before. But the way Hans Rosling used them to show data and make it interesting was an eye-opener for the visualization community. Who knew that you could use visualization not just to analyze data, but to present it and make it interesting? This wouldn’t have worked without Rosling’s performance, but that only worked because he had impressive charts to work with. CEO of Duarte Design, graphic designer and writer Nancy Duarte (@NancyDuarte) is well known for her best-selling books, including “slide:ology: The Art and Science of Creating Great Presentations.” (In the interests of full disclosure, Duarte is one of my idols, not just for what she does, but also because she shares my experience as an undergrad Mathematics major.) In her article Stop Underestimating Presentation Software, Duarte points out that presentation software — when used properly — can indeed be an effective tool: “Many of us know intuitively that visuals increase our understanding of concepts, but one study showed that people who follow directions that have both text and illustrations do 323 percent better than people following text-only directions. Much of that may have to do with the fact that we can understand an image in just 13 milliseconds. Regardless, it’s clear that including visuals with your text will help you get your message across. Presentation software is by far the easiest tool to use to do this.” Duarte and her team have extensively studied presentation structures to see what makes the best ones tick. Their VisualStory™ methodology is “designed to shape ideas into presentations that shift audience beliefs and behavior.” “If people can see what you’re saying, they’ll understand it. Use visual thinking and smart design to conceptualize your ideas and convey information clearly and powerfully.” Dan Roam (@dan_roam ) tells us that everyone is born with a talent for visual thinking, even those who swear they can’t draw. In “The Back of the Napkin,” one of my favorite business books, he shares a practical framework and visualization techniques along with proof points that illustrate how any problem can be made clearer with a picture.Roam’s Look–See-Imagine-Show approach has been used by enterprises from diverse sectors to solve complex problems, including Walmart, Wells Fargo, the United States Navy and General Electric. I am a visual thinker and find myself turning to Roam’s method, especially the six ways of seeing and six ways of showing construct that is based in the science of visual thinking. And while I don’t necessarily recommend this particular approach, I have a great story about a bar in Amsterdam where we literally planned out a product launch on the back of a cocktail napkin. At the end of the day, drawing by hand — on a whiteboard, a tablet or yes, the back of a napkin — is not only a great way to encourage collaboration, it makes both the “presenter” and the “audience” actively engage in the discussion. Improving the Customer Experience When we think about using pictures to actively engage customers, the element of visualization in creating engaging omnichannel experiences probably comes top of mind.I’ve written before about customer experience management and the importance of getting omnichannel right. But visuals are also critical to what lies beneath the customer experience. Case in point, journey maps. The HBR blog post, Using Customer Journey Maps to Improve Customer Experience, provides an apt definition: A customer journey map is a very simple idea: a diagram that illustrates the steps your customer(s) go through in engaging with your company, whether it be a product, an online experience, retail experience, or a service, or any combination. The more touchpoints you have, the more complicated — but necessary — such a map becomes. Sometimes customer journey maps are ‘cradle to grave,’ looking at the entire arc of engagement.” As Bernhard Schindlholzer writes, “Customer journeys provide new insights into consumers by incorporating an emotional as well as time-based dimension of consumer behavior.” This emotional element may be why Forrester Research has identified journey mapping as key to customer centric digital transformation.In his report, “Journey Mapping Best Practices,” Forrester’s Tony Costa (@tonyjcosta) points out that “Journey maps function as a lens through which employees view their company from the perspective of the customer, cutting through organizational silos and structures.” Forrester’s Deanna Laufer (@deannalaufer) wrote about the power of journey maps in her blog saying “all of a sudden, you see the light bulb go on for the participants. It can be the realization that their customer has to jump through an inordinate number of hoops to submit a simple service request or have to wait five to 10 days for repair … or when the workshop participants realize they have no idea what their customers are doing or thinking, but maybe they should.” Journey maps force a change in thinking and even a remaking of organizations in terms of the customer experiences delivered. Because of this, journey maps can become the new executive dashboard. As Forrester shares, “the customer-first nature of journey maps make them a natural fit as dashboards for monitoring a company’s performance. Generic dashboards and scorecards will be replaced by instrumented journey maps that update in real time.” Thinking with Pictures I considered submitting a series of pictures for this article, without text.Then I realized that just as words and music must come together to create a great song, the artful (and scientific) combination of words and pictures is the way to create great concepts and energize people to take action. And, by the way, our product launch on a cocktail napkin went just fine, thank you. Title image is a self portrait by Deb Miller; Image courtesy of Robert Nunnally (Flickr) via a CC BY 2.0 license This post first appeared on CMSWire.

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Forrester Names OpenText as Leader in DAM Wave Report

It’s been two years since Forrester last evaluated the Digital Asset Management marketplace OpenText Media Management is named as a leader in the most recent evaluation. We believe this validates all the hard work that has been done to build one of the world’s premiere DAM systems. According to the report, “The Forrester WaveTM: Digital Asset Management for Customer Experience, Q4 2014″, OpenText Media Management “offers a flexible platform with an impressive list of customer references. Accordingly, functionality is robust, with strengths in foundational capabilities: metadata, taxonomy, search, workflow and globalization.” Media Management builds on this foundation with our latest HTML5 User Interface to establish an elegant and intuitive way to interact and use your digital media assets. You can dowload the full report here. What you’ll discover in this comprehensive report is the key role DAM plays in the Age of the Customer and the two key areas of capabilities that today’s DAM solutions need to support. The Forrester WaveTM uses a transparent methodology to compare players in a software, hardware or services market so that the professionals the firm serves can make well-informed decisions without spending months conducting their own research. The Forrester WaveTM offers two big benefits to clients: a detailed analysis of vendors’ products and services based on transparent criteria and an Excel spreadsheet that allows clients to easily compare products and develop custom shortlists according to their own requirements. Demands for rich media in omni-channel commerce, enterprise video and marketing are evolving and growing exponentially. OpenText Media Management provides that core infrastructure to manage this ongoing digital transformation as well as the flexibility to customize to the way you work, making sure you get the right content and rich experiences to the users on the platforms and devices they choose. As a pioneer in the Digital Asset Management, OpenText helps you manage all your video, images and rich media in one place, from creation to consumption.

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Top 5 ECM Activities at Enterprise World

Enterprise World brings people together and sparks off planned and unplanned opportunities. It’s a place where new acquaintances, friends and mentors can be made because at Enterprise World, everyone there shares a commonality of purpose and interest. Face to face networking connects you with new people and ideas that will expand your thinking and your social networks in the months and years to come. The keynotes and breakout sessions enable you to learn what you know you need to know – but additionally the chance encounters and conversations will allow you learn things you didn’t even know you needed to know, leading you in new directions. Immerse yourself in a new way of thinking at Enterprise World. There are 99 ECM and Discovery sessions in addition to BPM, CEM, Cloud and Industry sessions. So which ones are they key ones you don’t want to miss? Here are my top 5 ECM choices. ECM Keynote. Wednesday, Nov 12th 10:50 AM – 12:00 PM. The ECM Keynote includes Cheryl McKinnon Principal Analyst at Forrester Research, Inc. identifying the top trends shaping ECM today. Also hear about new product enhancements, product roadmaps, customer stories and more… Real Customers Speak : Business Transformation through Information Governance. Thursday, Nov 13th 1pm – 1:45pm. This Interactive Customer Panel, moderated by Barclay Blair of the Information Governance Initiative, will draw out the real world experiences of 3 customers with live Information Governance Program in play in the Energy Sector, Local Government and a national railway. ECM-213 Tech Talk: Best Practices – Upgrading to Content Server 10.5. Wednesday, Nov 12th, 1:55 PM – 2:40 PM. The latest release of Content Suite Platform simplifies the upgrade process for administrators by providing many new tools and dashboards. Join the development team to learn about golden copies, cluster management, upgrade companion and tips from the field. ECM Lab. Tuesday, Nov 11th and Wednesday, Nov 12th 5:00 PM – 7:30 PM. The ECM Lab in the Expo hall is the go to place to get to know all the latest innovations that are being added to the Content Suite Platform in December . Customer Roundtables. Register for these exclusive opportunities to ask questions of customers who have implemented ECM.  I’m looking forward to Enterprise World because it brings everything and everyone together. Thousands of OpenText customers, employees and partners immersing themselves in today’s greatest technologies and sharing ideas to simplify, transform and accelerate the journey to their digital future.

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Getting Started With Digital Asset Management

digital asset management

All too often knowledge workers find themselves spending valuable time sifting through poorly organized content on shared network drives to find the assets that they need to do their jobs. An IDC report quantified the problem a couple of years back: Knowledge workers typically waste about 2.3 hours per week fruitlessly searching for information. I’m sure that this problem is not limited to marketing organizations, but I can speak from personal experience here. Without a clear digital asset management (DAM) plan in place, finding that screen shot I took a few months ago, say, or that report I meant to review a while back, is far too difficult—and sometimes impossible. Studies have shown that having a DAM solution can mean an annual savings of close to $40,000 annually. Other benefits include being able to find files quickly, avoiding the interruption of having to ask coworkers for images or documents, being able to reuse and repurpose content rather than redoing projects and providing access to content to offsite partners and teams. It’s time to consider building a DAM. In my quest for practical advice, I found a good overview at CMSWire. According to DAM expert Jeff Lawrence, the steps are fairly straightforward. Step 1, build a team. You’ll want to include stakeholders from IT, Marketing, Art, Records Management, and so on. I especially like his advice to recruit “that person who is the loudest in the crowd.” Step 2, define the vision. Before you roll up your sleeves, you and the team need to establish the project scope and define business goals. Step 3, be a cheerleader—get everyone excited. It makes good sense to get people involved early and keep them engaged so they are invested in the project. Rolling out new policies and procedures is always tough, and getting buy-in from the troops is key. Steps 4 and 5, performing a content inventory and making a migration plan, need no explanation. You need to know what assets you’ve already got on hand and figure out how to move them to the new DAM system before you can move forward. Step 6 moves into information governance territory. It’s essential to establish well-defined governance strategies and policies that define what assets will be moved into the DAM, a metadata policy and more. For an exploration of the relationship between information governance and DAM, read “The Greatness of Information Governance.” Step 7, work with your IT security team to define a secure infrastructure and establish clear policies for use of the system. Step 8, consider employing a content management system. As Lawrence writes, “automation helps.” An enterprise content management (ECM) system can provide useful automation and universal viewing/annotation tools that make it easier to find and collaborate with content. Finally, invest in ongoing maintenance. DAM is not a “set it and forget it” endeavor. And if it saves you time and money in the long run, doesn’t it make sense to have it operating at its best?

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Top Tips For Building Customer-Facing Apps For Insurance [Webinar]

Whether your insurance is covered by a gecko, a duck or a smiling pitch girl clad in white, providers are at the forefront of translating your information and data from various sources into an engaging custom experience. But to build these experiences, insurance providers need insight into how to leverage customer portals that will eventually provide a common customer experience. The insurance news website Property Casualty 360 ranked “Portals 2.0″ alongside “Business Intelligence” and “Customer Experience Management” as three of the five hottest technologies for the insurance industry to use. “Portal technology was impressive when it first came about and creating a portal for agents and another portal for consumers. Now, however, the insurance company has to look at other stakeholders and their needs to review, transmit or update information,” the site recently revealed in its 2014 trends piece. Insurers know they have to deliver relevant policy information to their customers and agents on-demand through many channels, including the call center, web, mobile devices and soon wearable devices. For carriers, this creates a defining moment of truth as systems falter due to limited functionality and cost-prohibitive enhancements are required.  If a portal is inconsistent, potentially inaccurate, and frustrating, agents and customers won’t use them, which effectively damages a business opportunity. But at the risk of sounding like an insurance company commercial, help is just a few clicks away. Recently, Actuate participated in a webinar that outlined the best steps insurance companies can take to build a better portal. Allen Bonde, VP Product Marketing & Innovation at Actuate Corporation, spoke about how industry-leading applications are able to manage and deliver visual data and deliver relevant visuals that pull data from a front-end customer portal. Bonde also touched on how technologies like BIRT best address client reporting, APIs, interactivity, scalability, security and multi-tenancy – not to mention the ability to scale to manage lots of customers. Other speakers in the webinar included: Nathan Golia, Senior Editor, Insurance & Technology (moderator) Steven Callahan, Management Consultant, Practice Director, The Nolan Company Chad Hersh, SVP, The Nolan Company To find out how technologies like BIRT reduce the pain of building these insurance portals – and therefore help to create customer loyalty and better experiences, register for the webinar.  

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Enterprise World 2014 Invites you to Experience Greatness!

Customer Experience , as defined in Wikipedia, is the sum of all experiences a customer has with a supplier of goods and/or services over the duration of their relationship with that supplier. In today’s world, this experience can make or break a business. At OpenText we strive to provide our customers with a platform and applications that allow them to deliver great Customer Experiences to their audiences, buyers and stakeholders. Enterprise World provides the perfect venue to come together and share vibrant stories of greatness. In fact our theme for this year’s Customer Experience Management track is called: Experience Greatness! This post will help you navigate greatness in products , ROI, peer discussions and technical how-to’s. CEM Sessions on Wednesday & Thursday We have over 35 CEM session and activities to help you experience greatness. Keynotes : We begin the day with Main Stage Keynotes from guest speakers and OpenText Executive Leadership. Right after lunch, we will host a mini-keynote session centered on the Experience Suite, where we have organized a “View on CEM” for you. The mini-keynote will tease you with discussions that will continue into more in-depth breakout sessions. It’s Time for Action: Lessons in Delivering Great Digital Experiences from across the world. • How are digital channels changing expectations and how should organizations respond? • Are social media efforts like the ALS “Ice Bucket Challenge” creating emotional connections that others should follow? • Beyond satisfaction: what is it that makes customers loyal? • What can we learn from companies that consistently ‘wow’ their customers? • Next steps: how should you invest to meet Digital Transformation initiatives? Breakouts : After the mini-keynote, we will have 4 CEM tracks running simultaneously. The 4 track themes each cover important facets that are needed to help build a great experience: Track 1: Great Omni Channel Communications Great communication is an art form. Hear from other organizations how they were able to design, develop and deploy rich omni-channel Communications: personalize and target invoices, email, webpages, receipts, documents and more to improve interaction with you anytime, anywhere and across any device. Track 2: Great Adaptive Content Information is an instrument for communication in every organization; dynamically tuning it for each individual’s preference is the heart of Adaptive content. This track will highlight how organizations like yours are accessing information from multiple sources to share the most effective content based on user preference. Track 4: Great Experiences With the rise in Digital Transformation projects, many organizations are looking at how to create, curate and manage media, web, documents, social and any other digital assets to deliver the most compelling Digital Experience possible. Looking for ideas in digital marketing, customer self-service, supply chain distribution? Hear how other companies have deliver seamless, comprehensive information flows – creation, publication, distribution, analysis and archiving of content to formulate a great experience. Track 4: Great Responsiveness This track will highlight the importance of creating a responsive web and mobile experience that is consistent, compelling and engaging. Adaptive content delivers experiences that are device agnostic, but only a Responsive system can adjust as users switch between devices and channels. Each track is designed to stimulate conversation and interaction with the audience on a variety of topics. Whether you want to continue the technical discussion or look for business oriented sessions, we have something just for you. Each of the 4 themed tracks above are broken into the following focus areas to help you narrow down to your most relevant area of interest. CEM – Experience Strategy – Market leading companies will share their strategic views on topics such as; how best to find the balance between adopting new digital channels and consistency across existing channels. CEM –Experience Insight – It’s all about the metrics. These sessions will provide insights into measurable activities such as; how to best make your customer experience seamless and responsive across the multitude of devices that both businesses and consumers use; or how to improve on your customer engagement. CEM – Experience Best Practices – In these sessions, you will hear direct from the practitioners who will offer their tips and advice on things like; how best to use HTML5 to improve the user experience; or how to optimize social collaboration for positive business impact. CEM – Experience Case Studies – What better way to bring the strategy, metrics and implementation to life than through real-life scenarios? OpenText customers share their stories such as a government’s ability to cement the citizen experience with social media capabilities. CEM – Roadmap – Upgrade Path – Product Management will share their vision for the next releases of our Experience Suite family of products, including Tempo Social, Portal, WEM, CCM and Media Management sessions. Hear how you can upgrade to the full Experience Suite and take advantage of this new integrated platform. Innovation and CEM Labs and Meetings Back by popular demand… don’t forget to stop by the expo hall and check out the latest Customer Experience Management information workflow (we like to call the CEM LAB) . Here you will find the process of creating, managing, sharing and publishing content all visible in one location. Can’t make it through the whole story in one sitting, don’t worry, we’ll have a time table set that you can pop in and out as often as you can to see it all. Expo Hall: WEM, Tempo Social, Portal, Media Management, Customer Communication Management and WSM pods. CEM LAB: Get your hands on (and give feedback to) the new UX designs for CEM products . Meet the Experts: Just in case you want some 1-1 time with our engineers, product managers, support or services staff on site, you can request meeting times with your favorite experts. As you can see, in addition to the great entertainment we have in store for you (announcing soon) , there are many different activities to partake in over the course of the week. Make sure to keep an eye on this community as my next post will talk about the great customers that are coming to join us and share thier stories. Take a look back at last year’s event here. REGISTER NOW to ATTEND! WE HOPE TO SEE YOU THERE!!! http://www.opentext.com/campaigns/enterprise-world-2014

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The File-Sharing Dilemma (a.k.a. It’s 3 a.m.: Do You Know Where Your Content Is?)

You’re in IT management. What keeps you up at night? Standard stuff like health and retirement savings? Or is it that new hire in marketing—the one leaving the office every night with confidential campaign plans copied to a flash drive? Or maybe it’s the R&D manager who’s using public file sync and sharing services to transfer sensitive product development specs between their work and home computers. If either of those scenarios is familiar, that’s what you should be stressing over. And for a couple of reasons: At the most basic level, that’s your organization’s critical information—its lifeblood—out there roaming beyond the firewall. At a higher level, it also means your enterprise probably doesn’t have a secure, compliant, user-friendly file sync and share solution integrated into its ECM platform. You’re not alone. If it makes you feel any better, many organizations are struggling to adapt to a rapidly evolving work environment that now encompasses anywhere, anytime, and on any device. To help put the changing landscape in perspective, here are some results I’ve pulled together from a few surveys: 65% of respondents have accessed work-related data on their mobile device, though only 10% have corporate-issued devices. Shockingly, over 50% said access to their devices wasn’t password protected. 78% of companies say the number of personal devices connecting to their networks has doubled over the past two years. However, less than 10% are fully aware of which devices are logging in. 93% of companies without an enterprise file sync and share platform say their employees are specifically using Dropbox, despite (or, more likely, due to an unawarenss of) several recently documented security issues . BYOx Has Arrived. What’s Your Response? Fact is, companies are expecting more out of their employees, and resourceful staff members are doing their best to deliver. So much so that the concept of BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) is quickly morphing into BYOx, where “x” is defined as whatever’s necessary to get the job done—devices, applications, web services, cloud storage, and more. Good on the staff for showing initiative, but it’s now all on the infrastructure architects to provide them with a secure, productive sandbox to play in. I’m not alone in saying that adopting an “anything goes” policy for external information sharing and storage is a no-win proposition. It results in an inefficient, tangled mess for users and gruesome security and governance risks for information guardians. There really is only one, true win-win in this new world, and it’s in the form of a cohesive, dedicated file sync and sharing application that’s built from the ground up with inherent security and compliance to excel at all three aspects of the corporate sync-and-share paradigm: Usability, Governance and Security. The Best of All File Sharing Worlds Is in One Simple Solution So, at the most basic level, it seems there are two paths to meeting the demands of the next-gen workforce and workplace. Sadly, one involves trying to grow a business through public file sync and sharing tools created for non-business use. Tools that are incompatible with your tech environment ask you to rely on someone else’s definition of security and can’t tell you where your data’s been hanging out. Truth is, solutions like OpenText Tempo Box are the foundation for the future. Tempo Box is built on an ECM infrastructure and operates in the cloud, on-premise, or as a hybrid model that incorporates both. It’s time to take the leap and implement a true enterprise-grade sync and share solution that effortlessly brings the best advantages of external file sync and sharing—content creation, collaboration, and storage—back behind the firewall and into a secure, governable structure where it belongs. I guarantee you’ll sleep better. Try Tempo Box today!

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The Power of Controlled Content in a Networked World

According to Gartner, enterprise data will grow 650 percent in the next five years, while IDC argues that the world’s information now doubles about every year and a half. When I hear statistics like this, terms such as Contentnado and Contentaggeddon come to my mind. (You may have guessed, yes I am a weather fan) What also comes to mind when I think about the amount of content that is being created, stored and shared across the web, in the cloud, on premise, thumb drives etc. are questions such as; How safe is this content once it leaves your grasp? Who is seeing the content? How can you control who has access to it? How can you ensure you can retrieve it where and when you need it? These are questions that we should all be asking ourselves every time we unleash a piece of content into the wild. But if you look at the stats, it is doubtful that we are. According to the Aberdeen Group’s Report SaaS Data Loss: The Problem You Didn’t Know You Had, 32% of companies surveyed had lost data from the cloud. Of these instances, 47% were due to end users deleting information, 17% were users overwriting data, and 13% were because hackers deleted info. Content is the lifeblood of business and should be protected and treated as a high-value asset. Yet, according to Enterprise Strategy Group’s research , 70% of organizations know or suspect this type of rogue employee activity takes place within their companies, and they’re sprinting to catch up and regain control over company data. Content loss is not the only problem: Organizations are also faced with an inability to retrieve content. According to IDC, 3 hours is spent each week recreating content that already exists. That translates into a large drain on your businesses productivity and efficiency rates. So what is the right approach to combating these problems? While it may seem like a daunting task, it doesn’t have to be. Solutions like OpenText Tempo Box are the foundation for the future of secure enterprise file sync and share. Tempo Box is built on OpenText’s ECM infrastructure and operates in the cloud or on-premise. We are so confident in its ability that we are now delivering Tempo Box as a free add-on to our Content Suite Platform 10.5. Tempo Box is now an integral component of our Content Suite Platform 10.5. Tempo Box offers our users a simplified approach to Enterprise Content Management and allows users to easily sync, share, and store information across all the devices they use, without sacrificing the records management rigor and security demanded by their organization’s internal policies and industry regulations. With multiple clients available, Tempo Box provides access and management of content from the Web and mobile devices, as well as content synchronization to the desktop. It’s time to take back control of your content and implement a true enterprise-grade sync-and-share solution that effortlessly brings the best advantages of external file sync and sharing—content creation, collaboration, and storage—into a secure, governable environment where it belongs. Learn more about Tempo Box today!

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Thinking Small to Re-Envision the Future of Customer Apps and Big Data

Big Data is being re-examined for its role in powering data-enriched customer apps. Harnessing the power of Big Data is all the rage. And with good reason, given the potential to turn large volumes of data into game-changing market insights and strategies. So it’s not a surprise that Big Data spending is expected to hit $50 billion by 2017 according to the latest market forecasts, and more than 60% of organizations (with $1B in revenue) have active Big Data projects according to a recent Actuate survey. Yet, it may be time to start thinking “small” when it comes to big data. Small in terms of the approaches and design perspectives that are all about delivering actionable insights and answers to the broadest possible audience. Even as many organizations strive to gain competitive advantage and better serve their customers by integrating and analyzing (and even sharing) their Big Data assets, several challenges emerge when it comes to delivering insights directly to customers and customer-facing staff: How to access the ever growing volume and diversity of data sources relevant to an organization’s internal business users, when most traditional BI systems/approaches are more suited for “batch” processing of largely transactional data without access to new Web/social/mobile data? How to manage/secure data assets and present large volumes of information to a large volume of end-customers in a highly consumable, engaging fashion (as a special type of Customer Experience Management or “CEM”) via both online and mobile delivery channels? How to deliver these capabilities to everyday business users and end-customers (who aren’t data scientists) with zero training, to help them performeveryday tasks like targeting a new campaign, understanding churn rates, tweaking an investment portfolio, or projecting next month’s sales commissions? How to merge (or at least begin to) the management of customer experience with the delivery of meaningful data-driven insights to end users. Customer experience today doesn’t just revolve around how effective it is to interact with an organization. It’s also increasingly linked with customers’ individual personal business and lifestyle data. These challenges, along with the success of consumer data-driven apps, like Amazon’s product recommendations or Nike Fuelband, in delivering Big Data insights in simple, smart ways, have inspired a number of us in the industry to re-examine the state of Big Data, and more specifically its role in powering data-enriched customer apps. In fact, this thinking has moved into the spotlight over the past 18 months as part of the small data movement (driven by the design principles: make it simple, make it smart, be responsive, be social) I’ve helped to advance via my research, blog, and sessions at various industry events. The movement is not only about shifting focus to the “last mile” of Big Data, but also the approaches and design perspectives that support the delivery of relevant insights and answers to everyday users. As we’ll explore below, this perspective can also help us re-envision the future face of both customer apps and data, as well as the tools that support the creators of those data-enriched customer experiences. The Future of the Data-Driven Customer Experience As data and insights play an increasingly important role in the end-customer journey, brands who tap the power of big data to better connect, inform and motivate their customers at each step have an opportunity to gain significant competitive advantage. Yet, this starts with a foundation that enables us to access, manage, and deliver today’s customer data in a form that fits the needs and skills of every user. Building on our small data philosophy and definition, a series of design criteria/questions emerge for these types of customer “Data-enriched Customer Experience Apps”: 1. Are all relevant data sources accessible? Are we able to deliver large volumes of new and historical individual data to each user on a regular basis? Are resulting customer apps accessible in the broadest sense—by being available to all regardless of role, location, or physical ability? 2. Is data presented so it is understandable (and not overwhelming)? Can we enable (non-technical) users to access relevant data as a report, dashboard, or data export? Are we personalizing the experience by account, role, or user segment? Can users easily navigate and explore their personal data, and access other sources from within the app? 3.  Are we being helpful and delivering actionable insights? Are we packaging insights and answers to support everyday tasks? Can users easily annotate, and share learnings from their session? Can support teams seamlessly monitor the customer experience and help out as requested? The Opportunity With ubiquitous computing driving more customer choice, effective delivery of individualized insights will be the differentiator for more brands in 2014 and beyond. In many cases, personalized data will define the brand experience, especially where we have a large volume of both users and insights from disparate sources, that need to be presented in a highly consumable fashion to everyday users (think asset management, healthcare portals, premium content services etc.). In this environment, scalability and smarts, plus a zero training interface and visual tools, are critical to delivering time to value, as well as experiences users will want to explore and share with their peers. This article first appeared on 1to1 Media. Used with permission.  

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Top 4 Digital Disruptors

The future of information is changing—fast. From the Internet of Things to wearable technology to 3D printing, today’s digital and technological disruptions are transforming the business world. “What I see coming over the next five years is like nothing I’ve seen before,” said Mark Barrenechea, OpenText CEO, at a recent event. “Digital disruption is stronger and faster than any technology shift we’ve seen.” Barrenechea identified four key disruptors in today’s business world: 1. Changing Workforces By the year 2020, 60 percent of OpenText’s workforce will have been born in the aged of the Internet—and their expectations will be set accordingly. “This workforce is dramatically different,” said Barrenechea. “The generation is not hierarchical, they’re social. They want to help each other. They’re impatient, mobile, and collaborative. And if [OpenText is] not digital, how am I going to hire and retain the best workforce?” To meet end users’ expectations, organizations need to give them easy access to each other and to their information. Workers expect to be able to work anywhere they want, from any device they want, in a secure, seamless environment. Learn more about the future of work and how to build a more collaborative business in the webinar on demand, Fuel the Speed of Innovation: Top 5 Ways to Inspire Collaboration in Your Organization. 2. Digital Transformation “Digital changes everything,” said Barrenechea. He asked the audience to consider the paper-driven, manual processes that are left in their organizations, and then to think of the benefits they’d see by digitizing them. For example, at OpenText the expense management process currently involves filling out a form, putting receipts in envelopes, and mailing them to distribution centers around the world where people manually enter in the information. “It’s a mundane process, but it’s an important process,” said Barrenechea. “And when we digitize it next year I’ll be able to take $4 million of expenses out of my business.” OpenText’s goal over the next four years is to have platforms that allow our customers to be completely digital in everything they do. Ultimately, this enables businesses to grow faster, scale quickly, and enable a whole new process for innovation. 3. New Disruptive Technologies “By 2020 one of the big nexuses of change will be new technology, and it’s going to drive us to be more effective, more efficient, and more competitive,” said Barrenechea. He listed a number of new technologies that are changing the business world, including: Wearable technology: The data generated by wearable technology such as Google Glass will come into enterprises via the Internet of Things. To help support this data, OpenText has set out to provide a globally reliable, secure network. 5G: Think of how 4G changed the world and made it vastly more mobile. The same is set to happen with 5G. Working on mobile devices: By the end of this year, Barrenechea predicts that OpenText will never again buy another PC. They’ll be primarily gone, exchanged for working on tablets and other mobile devices. New display technologies: The ability to fold up a device and take it with you will drive new display options over the next few years, giving way to more low-footprint choices like holographic displays. 3D printing: 3D printing is set to change the manufacturing world, shortening production cycles and reducing costs across the board. 4. The Cloud More and more workloads and processes are moving out into cloud architectures. According to Barrenechea, part of what makes the cloud so disruptive is its misinterpretation in some organizations. The line of business thinks they no longer need the CIO: “They can go out and say, ‘I’m going to move my marketing system out to the cloud and forget about the CIO’… But your data is now in many places, and may not be under the control of your CIO.” As the world becomes more cloud-centric, leading organizations are looking for cloud systems that help them ensure security and maintain control over their information. “There’s a nexus of forces coming for 2020,” said Barrenechea. “What will change our workplace, what will change digital, what will make us innovate?”

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Advocacy: The Bridge between Selling & Buying

The impact of the Internet and rise of social media is fueling a customer revolution in both B2C and B2B environments. Companies that don’t have a comprehensive, consistent and rich branding strategy that INCLUDES social media run the risk of undermining their entire sales machine. Buyers don’t want to be Sold to! OpenText CEO Mark Barrenechea noted in a recent Innovation Tour keynote address, “…customers have completed nearly 60% of their buying journey BEFORE engaging with a vendor’s selling process.” Utilizing the Internet, customers now have the means to retrieve essential information for themselves and will push back sales involvement as long as possible. The report referenced is published research conducted by CEB Marketing Leadership Council in Partnership with Google, entitled The Digital Evolution in B2B Marketing. According to the study of 1500 B2B professionals, 70+%: “are readily turning to their personal networks and publicly available information—increasingly via digital and social media channels—to self-diagnose their problems and form opinions about solutions.” While Content Marketing provides critical information that customers need to inform their decisions, it is engagement that transforms that information into knowledge. For customers, even more so than for prospects, experience provides the emotional attachment to deeply bind the customer to the solutions they own, and ultimately to your company. Considering this shift in buying dynamics, corporations need to consider allocating a significant portion of their marketing efforts and funds directly toward their customers, as they represent not only direct revenue opportunity but the extended opportunity in their social advocacy to your prospects. I’m not suggesting bribery, rather support of social communities outside and within your company, enriched by information and resources that help your customers meet, or exceed their business goals with your products. This can take the form of eLearning tools, best practices guides and tips and tricks content, particularly in engaging rich media format which is both more engaging and more effective. But these are table stakes. Once engaged, providing a forum, with access to product specialists, industry experts and other customers who are committed to your solutions insures that customers will attract prospects and validate your value proposition. Well produced, quality content will be referenced and shared among the customer and prospect communities. The brand elements will insure that your business is credited for that content and reflect that your business provides quality solutions and promotes business success. While your customer engagement facilitates customer success and fosters advocacy, your brand links that advocacy to your company and products. Your social engagement provides the connection between customers and prospects. Clearly, your advocates then become the most valued guide in the buyer’s journey and draw those buyers into your social space from which it becomes a natural channel to your marketing assets and engaging with your selling process. Social Media is empowering the Voice of the Consumer. If you’re not proactively engaging in a dialogue with customers then your brand is in the hands of strangers. Through our efforts, we in marketing engage directly or indirectly with every stage of the customer lifecycle, from Suspect to Opportunity and Close to Advocacy. As such, within the enterprise it’s our responsibility to insure strong, clear and dynamic articulation of our business’ value proposition. To be validated it must resonate within every communication, at every touch point and in all forums of customer interaction; no small task for enterprise marketing. The Experience Suite by OpenText is designed to assist in delivering your digital presence and the correspondence that enables you to amplify your online marketing strategy. Marketers are better able to manage their global brand and produce effective customer communications. The Experience Suite is a vehicle for Marketing and Line of Business owners to insure the seamless transition of customers from Suspect to Advocate, where advocacy becomes the bridge between buyer and seller. To learn more about OpenText’s Experience Suite visit http://www.opentext.com/what-we-do/products/customer-experience-management Are you experiencing a shift in buying behavior? How engaged are you with your customers in social venues?

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Using Big Data to Develop a Customer-Centric Culture [Webinar]

“Customer experience is like gravity. You may want to ignore it, but you don’t have that choice.” This juicy quote comes from Tim Walters, Principal Analyst at Digital Clarity Group (DCG), who presented a recent webinar with Allen Bonde, Vice President of Product Marketing and Innovation, Actuate. The focus of their talk: the relationship between Big Data and Customer Experience (CX). CX and customer experience management (CEM) are becoming increasingly critical to companies scrambling to get the best picture of customer needs. The momentum behind CX and CEM has certainly been bolstered by Big Data. Structured and unstructured data, when used well, enable companies to make better decisions about customers and what they may need. Companies of all shapes and sizes want to use Big Data to create offers and experiences that drive  lifelong brand loyalty. Companies that bring the power of Big Data to everyday business users, rather than keeping it in the realm of data scientists, can additionally drive better insight, campaign performance and organizational knowledge. During the webinar, Walters and Bonde address the paradigm of Big Data use and discuss how small data, digital disruption, experience delivery and advanced analytics help drive better customer experiences. As seen in the graphic above,  “fast is the new big” when it comes to using data to empower customer-facing teams and encourage a better understanding of customer desires – and, as Bonde says, “allow visuals to be the language of the data.” Check out more words of wisdom about using Big Data to develop a customer-centric culture. Register for the webinar here.

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INTERVIEW: Essential Features of DAM

This interview was published by the DAM Coalition, a community for Digital Asset Management and media professionals. To see other interviews and articles visit www.DAMCoalition.com DAM Coalition: Tell us about your history in digital asset management. How did you get involved with DAM? John Price: My background is in TV production during the pre-digital days. Back when analog video was still going on I worked on the technical side of production in news environments so I was directing, editing, producing and doing just about whatever needed to get done. It gave me great insight as to how the media process works. Then I moved into working with broadcast vendors in creating software to help them better manage all of the stuff they were doing. I helped them automate some of the processes that were involved in delivering their broadcast content. That evolved eventually into where I’m at with digital asset management and trying to help people manage those same processes. Now though, instead of going out to a single broadcast channel, I’m working with people as they work to get their message out across numerous channels and in multiple formats which need to be able to be viewed on many different devices. It’s a much more dynamic system, and in a lot of ways a much more complex one as well. How did that automation impact digital asset management? In a huge way, because it allowed us to control so many more processes than we were ever able to do in the past, and that gave people the freedom to focus on more important things. As you reduce manual, repetitive tasks and increase productivity, creativity jumps. DAM has allowed more to get done in various ways for a greater amount of people. In the broadcast world, most of the issues were caused by human error. Somebody hit the wrong button…somebody played the wrong commercial at the wrong time…somebody didn’t give the cue, etc. Those human errors can add up and they can be very costly. The whole prospect with automation was that it could reduce the amount of human intervention, which meant you could reduce the errors. The machine won’t be making those mistakes. Of course, it gets that much more complex, because you have to configure the system, you have to create those rules and manage the exceptions, but automation continues to be a major part of almost any DAM system. The ability to take those manual and repetitive tasks off the table so your staff has more time to be more productive is an incredibly powerful concept. When you’re having a conversation about what a DAM system can do for someone’s organization, do you find yourself having to temper expectations or is it more about trying to figure out what they want to accomplish? Conversations typically go in two directions. My preferred direction is starting out with a high level strategic path where the customer or company thinks in terms of what they’re going to do with their digital media. Most companies understand that the amount of media they’re generating is growing exponentially every year. What they don’t see is that they need to mange all of that information. Many people don’t think strategically about how they want to get from where they are today to where they want to be in the future. They aren’t sure how they’re going to go down that path. Let’s say right now that as an organization, you have all of your assets on shared drives or on people’s computers so you can’t really find anything. So you take a step back and identify that in five years, as an organization, you want to be able to access any of the rich media you own to deliver better product to your customer. If that’s where you want to go, you have quite a path to get there. But that’s where it can get exciting, because then we can start to explore lots of different methods and ways to make that a reality. There’s no one specific way to accomplish that goal, so we can look at what’s going to be the best way for your organization in terms of the way you work now. We can maximize what you have working in order to map the path for where you need to go. If you start thinking strategically, you’ll open up new opportunities. Your whole infrastructure can be energized by something like this, because it gives more people the ability to access information they want and need. That’s the one conversation we usually have. The other conversation takes that strategic thinking into account, but it’s focused on what exactly DAM is. When we have that conversation, it crystalizes into a couple core things that DAM needs to do for them. If it does those things well, it solves a lot of issues for the customer on a small and large scale. For me, the whole purpose of digital asset management is to maintain control and access to your digital assets. If I’m an organization and I’m putting lots of effort and cost into creating intellectual property, whether it’s a logo or message or anything else, I want to be able to control that asset and be able to provide proper access to it. For some of those assets, I want the entire world to be able to access them so they can download and share all of that and use them however they want. Other assets I want to maintain very tight control over that only certain people can see or use them. It all boils down to control and access. So much of it is about managing users, because I’m going to have internal users, external users, partners, agencies and all sorts of different people who are going to be contributing, consuming and modifying content. If I can create a system that allows them to easily access what they need while providing specific limitations around that access, then I’ve created a system that works for everyone. This helps the organization become more productive and also helps it grow the system. Say you’re a small marketing department and you just want to control your branding assets. Once you have that control and have everyone on the same page you can start looking at how you can expand that beyond marketing. Then you can pull in the product department and they can create consistent packaging. You can pull in the finance department so they can use the latest version of the logo. You can pull in whoever needs those assets. It really boils down to the control and access features that you can find in the typical DAM system. “DAM” is just one of the many acronyms that people use, sometimes interchangeably with others (PAM, MAM, ECM, EIM, CEM, etc.). Do you think we should still be saying “DAM” when we want to talk about the management and decisions surrounding the ingestion, cataloguing, storage, retrieval and distribution of digital assets? Or is it a moot point? DAM is a convenient and useful acronym; it has critical mass that conceptually people have some idea of what it is. As you mentioned, we have all kinds of different combinations of letters but you have to have something that you can hang all of these ideas on, and it’s kind of become accepted that “DAM” is that hanger. Whether they’re documents in an ECM system or media that needs to go to a WCM, you’re managing something that’s both digital and an asset, so the term “DAM” seems to be totally appropriate. Really though, you can look at a DAM system in whatever way you want to express the concept. And that expression will be in whatever way you want to fulfill the purpose of the DAM system. It might be in a small department, it might be WCM, it might be ECM, it might be multiple DAM systems across your entire organization. And there are lots of people who work in all of those ways and more. But it still comes down to having these digital assets and managing them in a way that works for individuals and for the organization. What sorts of people have become (to borrow a term from the DAM Guru Program) the “DAM guru” within an organization? A lot of it springs out of a desire from an individual in an organization who figures that there must be a better way to do something. They get tired of spending four hours a day or 25 hours week just trying to find a single image they need to use for a particular campaign, and that’s without even knowing if they have the rights to it. People often want to and need to organize the chaos that’s around them. As they start to organize they look for tools that will help them do that, and they find out that a DAM system can make their lives easier in many different ways. That’s the exciting thing, because you’re starting to see more and more organizations realize that these sorts of people are really providing a valuable service to the company as a whole. A lot of these organizations have tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of assets, and so many of the people in that organization have no idea where anything is or even what they have available. We are starting to see more job titles and positions being created that are focused on DAM, but titles don’t do the work. People do. And people will do what is needed so the work can be expanded. What’s an issue that you see come up over and over for people when they’re dealing with their DAM? Click link to see rest of interview: http://damcoalition.com/damcoalitionexclusive/story/what-are-the-essential-features-of-a-dam-system

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Customer Experience is not only Marketing’s responsibility

Business Processes gives power to Customer Experience Let me give you an example of how you might want to integrate your customer experience with your business processes. Let’s say a dissatisfied customer posts an angry tweet about your product or company. This can be captured and analysed via sentiment analysis and eventually used to initiate a resolution process within your company. Another example would be a Facebook post suggesting a new feature that can kick off a product enhancement process. It’s obvious that customer services with the necessary information at hand and the ability to resolve questions or issues quickly are essential to maintaining happy customers. A survey done by Forrester found that 1/3 of the companies still don’t have access to such basic information as “where is my order?” Another example would be if you have an e-commerce site selling for example snowboard gear. Your customer heads to the site to buy a new board. He gets information about what other people that bought this kind of board also look at. He goes through and checks out his basket. He makes the payment with his credit card online. Once he’s done, he gets an email with an order confirmation and an offer on a special price trip to the Alps. This offer is valid until 7.00 pm tonight. He thinks it looks interesting so he clicks the link and it opens up the offer. However, he does not have time to finish this off so he leaves the site continuing with some else. And as the day passes he forgets about he offer. At 5 pm a customer service rep calls him up, asking if he needed more information to be able to go a head and book the trip. This way you have connected your customer experience with your customer service function. Instead of just letting him forget about the trip you make sure a process is triggered within your company so that the customer service rep calls the customer up or sends and email to remind him. Different customers have different needs, making a one-size-fits-all service model does not work. Integrating Business Process Management with your Customer Experience gives you the flexibility you need to make the customer experience tailored to your customers and their current situation. To get the complete picture of a customer to be able to give the best customer experience through your entire company, easy access to document and information stored about your customer is essential for customer service and sales. This is where connecting Enterprise Content Management with Customer Experience gives you the opportunity to get a 360 degree view of the customer. Going back to the example of the snowboard buyer, the customer service should have full visibility into the order the customer placed using the online store. They should easily be able to access all documents related to that product to be able to give the customer the best experience possible. Also all information about the customer like customer contracts, customer emails, customer interactions/conversations and so on should be easily accessible to customer service as he is speaking with the customer. Giving the best customer experience possible. Another example would be a customer in a car accident could initiate an insurance claim using a mobile phone by simply taking a picture and submitting it via a mobile application. Data like location and time is captured automatically, saving the customer hours on the phone. BUT, this kind of information needs to be stored and managed according to regulations not just stored anywhere. How do you create a 360-degree view of your content and customer in an easy and efficient way so that you can deliver a great customer experience? http://www.opentext.com/campaigns/experience-suite/expert-webisodes.htm

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Effective, Mobile and In Control

For your company to efficiently deliver a great customer experience you need to be efficient when maintaining your online presence (web, social etc.), you need to be able to communicate efficiently with your customers and at the same time remain control over your brand. Let’s first have a look at delivering an online presence efficiently. What does that involve? So, for me it should be easy to create and edit content. It should be easy to maintain content in different languages. Have a look at how to best support that in this webinar about Multilingual Customer Experience, http://www.opentext.com/campaigns/content-without-borders.htm Everything created should automatically be made responsive, meaning that the content is available for different devices, without any manual work being needed. It does not matter which touch point your customer choose, the customer experience should always remain the same over different devices but also different formats. If your customer so decides to print your entire web, it should still look as intended AND at the same time, for the person creating the content, it should still be easy and efficient to maintain. As mentioned earlier, big data is causing problems for your customers. They have too much data and information to digest. Help them by delivering only the information they want by targeting content on your web site. They key is to make the customer feel like you have a personal relationship. A company that does this really well is Apple. One of the reasons they also took the first place on the “most valued brands” list. Communicate efficiently So far I have talked about online experience; your web, social and mobile channels. When it comes to customer experience ALL communication that you have with your customers should be included. Including customer documents like invoices, order confirmations, account statements. Where you mix transactional data coming from your backend system, with marketing campaigns. Or other correspondence, for example when Customer Service writes a letter to a customer based on an earlier conversation. All this communication is part of your customer experience. It does not matter if it’s digital or on paper. It is still part of your customer experience. Give our award winning campaign a try and see for yourself: http://makeastatement.opentext.com/content/tryityourself-en Your brand and your message to your customer should remain the same independent on channel, format or type of contact. Control your brand To be able to control your brand while supporting all aspects of customer experience within your company, it’s essential that you have your assets in order. Companies spend a lot of marketing money on recreating digital assets just because they fail to find them when needed. – According to IDC we spend 56% of our time to search for information and 9% of the times we don’t even find what we are looking for! When you get your web content streamlined with your customer communication and a central repository for your digital assets you have come a great way when it comes to managing your customer experience. You can then with ease pass control over to marketing. Making them less dependent on IT to manage the customer experience. How does your company regain efficiency, how does your company regain control in a constantly changing world?

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Responsive Web Experience Drove Me to Subscribe—and Stay

Let me start by saying I am a bit of a sports fan. Some of the sports I really like to watch aren’t all that popular in Canada. You guessed it – we’re not talking about hockey. My favorites are Rugby and Australian Rules Football (aka “Footy”). My Australian colleagues got me hooked on Footy with an amazing live game in Sydney—but I digress. While both games are best enjoyed live and while we can sometimes do that with Rugby, we have not found Footy live in our area. So I set out to watch on the net. My first experience was watching the Aussie Rules final the year before last. I had just come back from seeing the semi-final in Sydney and was determined to watch the Swans win the final. I got onto the AFL site, subscribed, and within a few minutes I was up and running. I started by buying just the one game to see how it went. I was amazed. I watched the game live (yes it was in the wee hours or the morning) and shared some texts with the guys in Australia. While watching I wanted to learn more about the players. As I was streaming from my laptop to my big screen TV, I pulled out the iPad and brought up the Swans team page with all the players and stats. I brought up the page for the other team as well. It all worked beautifully—great performance, great picture, and terrific experience of the site on both my laptop and my iPad. And the Swans won in a close match so it was even better. I have to admit that while I was completely impressed—so much that I have bought 2 season subscriptions since—I didn’t realize just how special this experience was. I knew the AFL used OpenText Web Experience Management software for their site, www.afl.com.au, but I didn’t really appreciate that responsive design was a big part of what drove the great experience. That is, until I tried to replicate the experience with my other favorite sport, rugby. Fast forward to this month when I wanted to watch a particular rugby game which shall go nameless. I was able to find the team’s site and read some of the info about the upcoming game. They didn’t have the ability to stream on the site. I had to search around and find a place with live streaming of the game, which was not affiliated with the team. The quality was poor. I pulled up the team site on my iPad while watching the game. I was surprised that some of the text appeared over other images or text and made things hard to read. I looked up some player stats and couldn’t read them because they had dark text on a dark background. Clearly this site wasn’t created with responsive design because it was just fine on the laptop. The result: I spent much less time on this team’s site, and I cancelled the viewing subscription after one game. The net of it was, for this consumer, using the right web design software and methods directly resulted in customer satisfaction, greater time on the site, and sales. If you would like to learn more about how Web Experience Management can make a real difference in your internal and external web experiences, visit www.opentext.com/simplify. Coming Soon: Rugby Fights Back with some great web experiences. Stay tuned!

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