Business Process Management

Putting the “Super” in QSuper

Submitted by Michelle Dufty on May 17, 2013 We’re Talking Smart Process Applications for Financial Services We have all heard the story before: organizations trying to become more customer-centric but can’t because they are held back by ageing applications and siloed operations that leave them unable to keep up with the demands of the modern customer. I have been working a lot recently with customers in the Financial Services industry where this issue is extremely prevalent. The good news is that there are alternatives to legacy systems that no longer fit the bill, and at OpenText we call them Smart Process Applications. Smart Process Apps combine the power of Business Process Management or Case Management, with ECM, capture, analytics, collaboration, and customer communications management to allow organizations to be more collaborative and support the dynamic and demanding customer environment that exists today. Smart Process Apps break down the barriers of application silos while still referencing the legacy applications as the system of record. I am really pleased to announce a new case study we did with QSuper, one of Australia’s largest superannuation (aka retirement) funds that service government employees, related entity workers, and their spouses. Like many financial services organizations, QSuper operates in a highly competitive and dynamic environment, where legacy applications with limited functionality and no central view of the customer could limit their ability to open new accounts, provide stellar customer service, and ensure consistence execution of operations. QSuper used to rely on a workflow system that was embedded within one part of their organization. The system had limited functionality, no disaster recovery capabilities, and experienced frequent downtime – that led to disruptions in their business. In addition to these issues, eight different systems were used by operations staff with numerous repositories for customer information, which included a mixture of paper and electronic documents. Like many other financial services organizations, QSuper realized that they needed to modernize their application infrastructure to provide a single view of their customer in order to become more efficient and improve the customer experience. This new system, workQ, is a Smart Process Application that now handles 78 percent of customer administration processes and is used across QSuper, from knowledge workers processing claims to business operations and IT staff to mid-and senior-level management. They have also been able to decommission 5 of the 8 former customer systems, which has significantly reduced business operations costs and improved employee responsiveness to customer inquiries. The advanced analytics and reporting in the new system has reduced the manual effort to create reports by 99% and provides a much clearer view of overall business performance. QSuper is just one example of numerous customers who are providing better customer service with a modern, Smart Process Application infrastructure. To learn more about Smart Process Apps and other customer success stories, follow me here.

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With Smart Process Applications, More is Always Better

Submitted by Brian Wick on May 6, 2013 The Forrester Wave is out and OpenText is a “leader” for Smart Process Applications. It is great to be recognized for having a very broad and powerful set of EIM technologies to create Smart Process Applications. Forrester comments in their paper “Smart Process Applications fills a Big Business Gap” released in Aug of 2012 that “the emergence of smart process apps makes collaborative processes the next frontier for software.” They also speculate that BPM suites will be renamed Smart Process Applications in the future. As many critical processes truly are human- centric and collaborative, it is clear that Smart Process Apps will be one of the compelling and fastest growing areas of software for years to come. What I find even more exciting is how prolific we can make Smart Process Applications. Our MBPM platform has always made it easy for customers to roll out Smart Process Apps, but when you add the OpenText Assure platform (built upon MBPM), it truly becomes a Smart Process Application Factory. Assure provides a set of over 70 pre-built services and reports that can be assembled like building blocks to create and deploy high value Smart Process Apps much faster than the “blank slate” approaches found in traditional BPM suites. Once an organization deploys their first Smart Process Application with Assure, they become adept at designing a process, using the building blocks to assemble their solution, and then deploying their apps. The value of Smart Process Apps is quickly spread across the organization, with new apps up and running in as little as 30 days. And as we continue to introduce more building block services with Assure, our clients will receive even higher value, and be able to deploy their Smart Process Apps even faster. As an example, I’ve recently spent time with our customer PSCU, the nation’s largest credit union servicing organization. (We have a full case study here.) Using our Assure Smart Process App platform, they have deployed customer and agent portals, and apps for employee onboarding, e-commerce, account management and fraud management. And they will be rolling out a comprehensive dispute resolution system in the near future. The new Smart Process Applications they’ve deployed at PSCU have saved them over $300,000 in service delivery costs in the first year, and they are now rolling out new process-based services in 25% of the time with Assure. According to PSCU, being able to respond faster and more efficiently to customer requests keeps them far ahead of the competition, and being able to roll out more apps, and do it faster, means they are continually increasing the value they receive from the platform. For another example, I recently spoke to a customer recently called MFDA, also known as the Mutual Fund Dealers Association of Canada. They provide their industry with information, guidance and regulations that benefit the investing public and strengthen their industry as a whole. They first purchased MBPM in 2007, and deployed their first four applications in the first year. Over the next five years, they kept rolling out Smart Process Apps for HR, voting, IT projects, filings, etc., and now have 23 applications creating significant value for their organization. Again, the more solutions they developed, the more value they received from the platform. In fact, Sandy Kemsley, who writes a widely read BPM blog called “Column2” (http://www.column2.com) described their impressive track record for implementation in a post late last year. So, the next time you hear someone saying “too much of a good thing can be bad,” I might agree if it’s eating cake or juggling chainsaws, but if they’re referring to Smart Process Applications, then more is always better.

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We’re talking Smart Process Apps — and so is Forrester

Submitted by Derek Weeks on April 26, 2013 OpenText was thrilled this week to be named a leader in the Smart Process Apps Wave from Forrester. What an honor! Although a new term for many following the BPM market, Smart Process Apps are a reflection of innovations we have been delivering in our business over the past few years — giving our customers more agile work environments, helping them innovate faster, and solving problems that extend beyond the boundaries of BPM for our customers. For those following our BPM roadmaps, you’ll remember that a few years ago, we integrated OpenText’s Content Server, Capture, and StreamServe products with our BPM solutions — a move that directly reflects OpenText’s EIM strategy today. Then last September, in Forrester’s inaugural report on Smart Process Applications they defined a new market around the combination of these same technologies. This was a great validation on the hard work our Dev teams delivered on our roadmap as well as OpenText’s EIM strategy. Beyond the integration across our portfolio, we have been working on the next generation of our core BPM offerings — introducing building blocks for process and case management that are allowing our customers to accelerate design time for Smart Process Applications, reduce risks on scoping deployments, and deliver better time to value to their organizations. These next generation offerings are built on top of our core BPM platforms. For horizontal process applications, we offer Assure (e.g., HR, Customer Service, etc.) and if you are interested in vertical solutions like those for Financial Services, we offer Client Management (e.g., Insurance, Wealth Management, etc.). Over the past few months, I have been out meeting our customers and partners in Europe and North America at our OpenText EIM Day events and have heard some amazing stories. Companies like Nelnet are showing how they are combining BPM and Capture technologies to improve the servicing of student loans. Organizations like PSCU are delivering new innovative process-based services through personalized self-service portals to their credit union clients using the building blocks of our Smart Process Application platform (they improved customer satisfaction by 80% in the past nine months). Partners like Microsoft are helping us show off the Smart Process App that we built with them for Dodd-Frank compliance. And organizations like KRZ in Germany are rolling out process-based service applications to over 30 municipalities, helping with everything from invoice management to processing applications for kindergarten enrollment. There are still a few more EIM Day events left with more interesting stories to come. If you are interested in learning more about our Smart Process Applications, come join us at one of these events. If we can’t see you there, and you want to learn more about our Smart Process Applications, take a peek at our website or download a free copy of the Smart Process Apps Wave report here.

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While reminiscing about a recent trip to London, England I was reminded of my travels on the Underground. With every step onto or off the commuter train I was instructed by the overhead loud speaker to pay close attention to the small opening in front of me. Any misstep could have caused harm or hindered my journey onward. There have been a number of conversations about the importance of marketing automation tools and WEM’s function in helping organizations elevate brand identity and distinguish themselves from all the noise and other distractions. A larger customer experience ecosystem begins to emerge where both technologies play critical roles in helping organizations understand a 3-D view of their customer and deliver optimized online experiences. As marketing programs and campaigns become more sophisticated, we need to be “mindful” of some of the hand-off points and gaps between these complimentary technologies. As with all hot new buzzwords “marketing automation” is not a new concept and has been around for some time. Marketing Automation is the process of creating and defining programs and campaigns that engage customers across multiple, interactive touch points. Following specific rules of engagement (e.g. scoring) the intent is to generate demand, nurture and convert only those leads that are qualified. Reporting and accountability are essential at every touch point and are used by marketing departments to justify each dollar spent. WEM solutions support all online marketing initiatives by providing marketers (such as content authors, web designers and graphic designers) with simplified tools for creating and managing all your corporate web properties. It delivers dynamic, interactive, personalized and contextualized web content to customers regardless of the channel they arrive from. Inherent in these tools are enterprise social capabilities that allow for ongoing collaborative discussions that facilitate expert communities of knowledge. Finally, web and social analytics tools collect and measure real-time, click stream data in the context of the published “live” site. What if you could have both technologies working together harmoniously? A fully integrated marketing platform that exchanged customer related information, supported all marketing related activities, and managed your corporate brand content from one central point of access? The goal of marketing automation and WEM is to integrate marketing processes that collect data and content from multiple locations toward developing meaningful customer relationships that begin and continue well after the initial sales cycle is complete. Consumers do not want to feel as though they are being marketed at — they want to feel the content they uncover is part of their organic efforts. Let’s look at some of the gaps between the two technologies: 1. The Focus on Content Marketing Sourced for the Web According to Forrester’s report “The Rise of Content Marketing: Invest In Content Development and Management for Success,” 58 percent of marketers consider their website to be the most important channel when creating interactive marketing content, second to social media (15%). Marketers will continue to evolve and enhance the online experience by creating great and meaningful content for their sites. It’s no surprise that companies that invest in WEM solutions report greater online success in delivering and managing all corporate content. Marketing automation solutions need to leverage not only the creation of new content for websites but all the other technical features in WEM. For example, WEM systems can determine how content is consumed and from what device; gather analytics on customer behavior, geo-location, previous interactions and social media participation. This type of data can be used by marketing automation solutions to influence how subsequent follow-up conversations get started and remain open. 2. CMO and CIO Alignment A consistent trend I’m seeing is how marketers are solving their own business problems with little or no IT intervention. End users are self-provisioning solutions, in the cloud or on premises, and using marketing spend to do so. WEM solutions traditionally owned, built and secured by IT are now sharing ownership with marketing. But a three dimensional view of the customer can only be achieved when information can be gathered from all corporate data stores — whether managed by IT or marketing. According the Aberdeen Group report “Enhancing Customer Experience through CIO and CMO Alignment,” companies with CIO and CMO alignment achieve a 10.1 percent higher annual year-over-year growth in ROMI, compared with 5.6 percent of their peers. “This shows that partnering with peers in IT helps marketers better analyze customer information and launch campaigns that deliver quantifiable results by addressing changing customer needs.” 3. Omni-Channel Consistency Marketers are faced with the challenge of providing a consistent online experience across all delivery touch points — namely mobile devices. The same challenge is replicated by a marketing automation tool that needs to maintain a dialogue via the same context of the interaction. WEM solutions offer native support to many social media features (e.g. blogs, wikis, discussion threads) and packaged integration into many social networking sites. Harnessing WEM’s targeted listening capabilities will enhance how marketing automation tools evaluate customer engagement and influence lead scoring. 4. Cross-enterprise Information Processing Customers are engaged with a number of different systems stored across the enterprise — ERP, CRM, e-Commerce, WEM and CMS. The proper application of a Business Process Management system can capture content and metadata from multiple corporate locations and help facilitate marketing automation systems to properly respond to customer inquiries. 5. Capturing Return on Marketing Investment (ROMI) Marketing wisdom tell us that if you cannot measure effectiveness, you cannot measure its change. Without a common set of metrics, as provided by both systems, all marketing efforts are at risk and offer no opportunity for correction and improvement. According to the Aberdeen report “CEM: Using the Power of Analytics to Optimize Customer Delight,” “analytical tools are a critical component for providing businesses with the intelligence that can be used to create both contextual and potential prospect / customer conversations.” One of the common questions I hear from customers is “how do we collect data from disparate systems, which utilize different metrics, and standardize it within one meaningful report?” Rather than selling products or services to your customers, ensure that both your WEM and marketing automation system’s primary goal is to help customers find the information they need. Identifying and addressing these gaps is the first step in achieving a complete customer view that elevates your brand to one that generates loyalty, advocacy and satisfaction. My advice — Don’t try and close all the gaps at once. Start small but think big. Start by integrating “progressive profiling” in your WEM system so that it passes information to your marketing automation tool. This will provide incremental insights into what prospects are looking to understand and qualify how likely they will be to purchase. Image courtesy of dutourdumonde (Shutterstock)

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In The Age of the Customer BPMS is not enough

Submitted by Mark McGregor on March 8, 2013 We live in “In the Age of the Customer” a time when he world’s leading companies look outward to emphasize a deep understanding of their customers, and what it takes to make their customers successful. They have come to realize that only when their customers are successful, will they be successful. As Sam Walton once said “The Customer is King – for they can fire everyone in the organisation from the CEO down – simply by spending their money somewhere else!” Switching our mind-set from one of internal focus to one of external focus is not easy; we know intuitively that an outside-in approach leads us to better decisions on how to serve our customers. But for the most part the monolithic IT systems upon which we mostly still rely are not best suited to supporting us during such a transition and can actually prevent us from serving our customers. The need to better serve customers is something that BPM and in particular BPMS have long been touted as the ideal technology. Well suited to assist such business transformations, however, in reality the majority of use cases for BPMS tools have been directed at the automation of more transactional work. We have concentrated on removing paper or reducing task times e.g. BPM has been used as a tool for efficiency and still very much internally focused. Truly successful businesses and leaders understand that the growth they seek and the market differentiation that sets them apart only comes when they switch their focus from efficiency and instead direct their people and efforts in the direction of effectiveness. The results are even better when that effectiveness is directed at better serving their customers. Consider the example of First United Bank and Trust, a company that found that the old ways of working were actually limited their ability to grow as a business. By first addressing efficiency issues and then moving on to effectiveness they were able to harness their people and resources better, deliver better service to their customers and as a result accelerate their corporate growth once more. In this short video, Bryan Wandel, Director of IT, First United Bank and Trust, shares how they made the change. This need for effectiveness requires that we once again rethink our IT systems and our approaches to developing them. Any business today, however large or small is going to be more dependent on technology today than ever before. Greater effectiveness requires us to find better ways to create flexible applications that are more able to deliver what we need, not just today, but tomorrow and the day after – for agility and responsiveness are just two of the hallmarks of an effective business. Much of the effectiveness we seek will come as result of a better harnessing of the skills and abilities and enabling greater collaboration between our own people, between us and our customers and even between us and our competitors. In this respect the jury is still out on whether pure BPMS is really the right technology to help us. It seems that perhaps there is a better way; Smart Process Apps an approach that provides us with the benefits of traditional package solutions, but with the greater flexibility afforded by BPMS based systems. At the same time Smart Process Apps reduce system implementation times, while supporting a more collaborative environment and providing ubiquitous access to systems. At first glance you might think that Smart Process Apps is just another marketing buzzword. If so consider that recent report by Forrester Research suggests that the market for Smart Process Apps will reach $27.6bn by 2015, while the BPM platform market will only grow to around $6.5bn. (To learn more about what Forrester have to say on Smart Process Apps click here for a free report) Based on these numbers it would seem that transitioning to Smart Process Apps offers a win-win for both vendors and their clients.

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OpenText Smart Process Applications: The Importance of Process On-Ramps and Off-Ramps

Submitted by Brian Wick on March 8, 2013 Have you ever used your fingernail to turn a screw or the heel of your shoe to hammer a nail? I thought so. Didn’t work out so well did it? You used a workaround because, at the time, you didn’t have the right tool for the job. It’s the same thing when certain dynamic processes within an organization are not effectively managed by transactional or functional applications. Those systems often can’t keep up with the changing needs of dynamic, human-centric processes such as managing a request for services, opening an account, or managing exceptions, and knowledge workers will use spreadsheets, email, IMs, Access databases and other tools as workarounds to get the job done. Forrester in refers to these kinds of processes “untamed,” and when content and actions within untamed processes are not managed, they add will costs and time to the process, increase risk to the organization, and result in poor customer experiences. The concept of the Smart Process Applications has become the most compelling new type of solution for unstructured and collaborative processes. The analyst firm Forrester does a nice job of explaining these new types of applications in their report called “Smart Process Applications Fill A Big Business Gap” (downloadable from the OpenText website), and how they include the following components: Information Capture Data Awareness Information Capture Content Analysis Collaboration Multi-Channel Communications And how all of these services are orchestrated and managed by a business process management infrastructure. Smart Process Applications created with these technologies effectively bridge the gap between transactional applications and dynamic human engagement, and can tame the untamed processes. To consider the power of Smart Process Applications, let’s first look at the capture and communications aspects of a process. These are the “on-ramps” and “off-ramps” of a process, and are how an organization engages with its customers, partners, citizens and employees, both in the information capture, and outbound communication aspects of a process. Examples of on-ramps include a mortgage application, the forms needed to apply for a business permit, or an insurance claim form, and they may trigger a process or be a communication in the middle of a process when more information is needed. Examples of off-ramps include a notification to the mortgage applicant for further information or actions, an acceptance or rejection notification, or a marketing communication with a desired action. The importance of the on-ramps and off-ramps is described by Forrester in that enterprises will begin to distinguish and differentiate themselves by the way they handle customer requests, exceptions, and other ad hoc engagements with speed, efficiency, and quality. According to them, taming the workarounds must be done from the “outside in,” by understanding the user’s perspective first before mapping the internal components needed to support a process. For the onramps, this means high quality, multi-channel inputs. This includes dynamic information captures sessions that take the user “by-the-hand” through sophisticated transactions/interactions, providing intuitive help, engagement history where needed, and by eliminating the need to input redundant or known information. How many of you have yelled at a form: “… But you already asked me that!” Hopefully, no one was around to hear you. More importantly, effective on-ramping is providing access to users in the ways they want, which is multi-channel communications and now means mobile access along with web-based, paper-based, and phone-based mobile interactions. The Apple app store experience, starting with the iPhone and now tablets, has changed expectations with more and more (meaning older) users that they should be able to start any process, check a status, purchase goods, and process payment from any mobile device they want, wherever they are. Mobile is no longer an option for process engagement – it’s a requirement. On the off-ramp side of a process, how an organization responds will directly impact the user’s experience, and can affect process participation or abandonment, overall satisfaction, and sales. Impersonal text-based communications get lost in the white noise of incoming content, and create a lack of connection with an audience. Multi-channel response communication that provides clear, relevant, personalized, and visually appealing interaction, across any device, is now the expectation. So the key to bridging the engagement gap between process systems and users is through a complete Smart Process Application such as the ones provided by OpenText. They extend the BPM foundation with broad EIM components that create the on-ramps and off-ramps that truly engage users. OpenText provides a very powerful set of on-ramps with: OpenText Social Workplace – for extending processes to Apple IOS-based devices. OpenText Portal – for creating windows into a process with rich content. OpenText Mobile Wave – for creating mobile experiences across devices. OpenText Capture and Recognition – to capture and digitize document and form information . OpenText Tempo Social – to engage users through with social and team worksites. For off ramps, OpenText offers the industry leading tools including: OpenText Customer Communications Management – to automate the generation of compelling customer communications – both digitally and via paper. OpenText Mobile Wave – to communicate with users across mobile platforms. OpenText WCM – to create engaging web experiences. Organizations that attempt to manage their untamed processes without a broad set of tools for user engagement may improve internal productivity, but will not extend the value outside their organization to the people that really matter most. OpenText has a very broad set of EIM pillars that work together to create high value Smart Process Applications. They are the right tools for the job. A great example of a customer that used OpenText to change how it engages with clients is Irish Life, where BPM and social tools were used to create a social media-based case management claims solution. Check out the video. According to Irish Life, the solution boosted morale, improved customer service with advance reporting and collaboration, and increased internal productivity by 35% in the process. In his report called “Stuck In Cement: When Packaged Apps Create Barriers To Innovation,” Craig Le Clair of Forrester writes about “recapturing human engagement – but doing it at scale.” That has been a huge challenge, with most organizations failing miserably in developing the best, or even adequate on-ramps and off-ramps. Now organizations can achieve this goal because with OpenText’s Smart Process Applications, there is finally the right set of tools. One final note, be sure to download a free copy of Forrester Research, Inc.’s report, “Smart Process Applications Fill a Big Business Gap” at: www.opentextbpm.com/SmartProcessAppsReport, and register for OpenText’s Smart Process Applications webinar with Forrester Vice President and Principal Analyst, Craig LeClair, on March 20th.

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Information does matter

In recent years there have been manyhorror stories about the mismanagement of information, whether itpertains to personal, private or public data in the form of lostlaptops, discs, files and briefcases etc. How should information bemanaged? Could anything have been done to avoid the loss or minimise therisk of human error? Is there an easy answer? The HM Government released a whitepaper entitled“Information Matters: Building Governments Capability in ManagingKnowledge and Information” this highlights an extension of‘Transformational Government into data, information and knowledgemanagement where there is a need for best practice policy supported bytechnology’. Ithas been said before that this is the century or age of information.More information is being created every day, this in turn means thatmore information is being stored every day too. Businesses, Services,Governments and other Organisations all need this ‘lifeblood’ ofinformation to be accessible, useable, safe and accountable. Thegovernment is committed to addressing specific aspects of informationmanagement and information security (BS10012 and BS27001). This is allvery well, but having just information management on its own is notenough. Good information management needs to be aligned with goodknowledge management. Well, what use is information if it is not usedcorrectly? If you go to an ATM to withdraw money, you expect that thebank has used the information about you correctly, to ensure that youget your money from the correct account when you need it. But what ifthis information was not managed properly and you were abroad andneeding to access your funds and were unable to? This is a simplescenario but think about how information is used when you renew your cartax online, at passport control or to ensure you have the correct taxcode etc. It is not just about having the information but using iteffectively. Recently Knowledge Management and Information Managementhave been formally recognised as functions of government, in the sameway that finance, IT and communications are. With more and moreinformation being created, how long should you keep certain pieces ofinformation before it loses its usefulness or becomes dangerous? Whodecides what parameters are set for this? How does this impact on dataprotection laws? These are just a few of the many important questionsraised. Each organisation will have differing requirements on thismatter. There are guidelines online for organisations which help them tomeet the necessary regulations required by law, but you still need tomanage this effectively. So what do Governments and Businessesneed to do in order to deploy an effective information management andknowledge management strategy? The government, here in the UK, has setout guidelines highlighted in their Information Matters whitepaper and have organised a committee to help manage this. Many businesseshave done the same, but some are not seeing the bigger picture yet.People are talking about big data and the age of information but whatare they doing about it? Many of their current systems andprocess have been in place for many years and a lot of the informationis paper based. Technology is moving forward at an exponential rate,particularly with smart phones and tablet devices. Many businessprocesses nowadays are handled electronically with little or no actualpaperwork involved, but how is this information tracked and handled?Electronic document and records management software (EDRMS) appears tobe the answer. Many vendors will offer this at a departmental level orin some cases at enterprise level. Having an EDRMS system in place willensure that your business or government department meets the necessarylegislations and ensure that you have an effective informationmanagement strategy. However, there is a relatively new approach called Enterprise Information Management(EIM). In effect what EIM does is brings structure to the unstructured by unleashing the power of information to the organisation. With the growth of information coupled with the myriad of differentformats,only one organisation is standing up to be the leader in thisfield,with the goal of becoming recognised as the #1 EIM vendor. This organisation is already demonstrating leadership, according toanalystsGartner and Forrester, and is well on its way to being leaderin allfive pillars of EIM, namely Enterprise Content Management (ECM), Business Process Management (BPM), Customer Experience Management(CEM),Information Exchange and Discovery. If I were a CIO of a majororganisation or government department, I know full well what I would bedoing. I would contact my local OpenText office and ask for guidance. By acting now, I would hope to avoid any mishapsor issues around information management, compliance and legislationwithin my organisation.

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The Curious Case of the Courts’ CIO: How ACM Solves the New Service Delivery Challenge

This is a CMSWire cross-post by Deb Miller. Let’sstart 2013 by considering how the CIO function can deliver newsolutions to your enterprise when as much as 80 percent of the IT budgetgoes to just keeping the lights on, maintaining your current systems. With market conditions forcing increased cost cutting, and a distincttrend to place more of the technology decision making and buying powerin the hands of the business, the mystery of successful delivery isgetting harder for the CIO to solve. Those who follow my CMSWire article series will not be surprised to discover that for me the clues all lead to adaptive case management as the solution. Myproof includes the story of one CIO, the CIO of the Courts of PuertoRico Administration, who managed to “crack the case” using casemanagement to cost-effectively provide new services. The CIO and the C-Suite Challenge Whatmakes a successful CIO?Some would say this is a trick question, thatthere is no such thing as a successful CIO, that in fact the “I” in CIOstands forIrrelevant.There are certainly a lot of obstacles in theway of success. First, there is the issue of strategy oversight.While the CIO is heldresponsible for aligning IT with enterprise business priorities,authority doesn’t always accompany responsibility. The CIO is theenterprise’s top technology manager but in the most recent Society for Information Management survey, only 43 percent of the responding CIOs report directly to the CEO. And, according to the Economist Group’s, “The C-Suite Challenges IT: NewExpectations for Business Value,” almost 20 percent of CIOs actuallyhave no role in setting IT strategy. Technology spenddecisions are also a challenge. IDC just predicted that 58 percent ofnew IT investments this year will directly involve the Line of Businessin the decision making, and 25 percent of these will have an LOB exec asa key decision maker. Gartner is predicting a massive shift in budgetsfor the future, resulting in businesses groups controlling as much as 90percent of technology spend. If these challenges aren’t difficultenough, then consider that the very existence and relevance of the CIOrole is constantly under fire.As one CIO.com article on the Future of the CIOproclaims, “For almost as long as there have been CIOs, we’ve heardbreathless speculation about whether the position will last, and if so,in what form.” Time works against the CIO.The average tenure of a CIO is only about 5 years– a short window in which to make meaningful contributions to thebusiness.No wonder then that creating value for the enterprise is sucha mysterious undertaking.Of coursecynics would say there is clearformula to solving the mystery:the first year is spent creating theplan, the secondyear is for selecting new technology and prioritizingthe projects, the third yearis for beginning the implementation, andthe fourthyear is to be spent finding the next job to move to in thecoming year.I’m not that cynical!In fact, I see ample evidence oftruly successful CIOs helping to transform their enterprises.How arethey doing this? How Means, Motive and Opportunity Help Solve the CIO Challenge The CEB in their CIO survey for 2013 found that CIO priorities for the next twelve months show strong urgency around reshaping how IT creates valueand how it is governed.Of course, I have a technology and solutionapproach in mind here.[Cue the suspenseful mystery music in thebackground and then play the big reveal sound.]I see adaptive casemanagement as one of the most effective ways for CIOs to meet thechallenge of creating value because it helps in 3 critical areas. First, the meansto accomplishing IT value creation will require a smart combination oftechnology and change management.I’ve frequently shared my views onhow case management tackles the most difficult aspects of delivering newvalue to the organization by ensuring that people adopt the new solution. Valuecreation will also require the CIO to identify and communicate sharedobjectives with enterprise owners.It needs to be clear that the motive for implementing new solutions is tied to business strategy and results and the ability to innovate. And finally to be successful in creating value, the CIO will have to work quickly to leverage a short window of opportunity.The current environment has zero tolerance for long projects with delayed ROI. Whilecomplete roll outs reasonably require a multi-year approach, the key isto deliver value in each phase. This means, as I explored in an earlierCMSWire article on “The Best Way to Improve Business Performance,” that the methodology surrounding the implementation is as important as the technology itself. CIO Best Practice, Courts of Puerto Rico One interesting example of a CIO leveraging case management as a best practice is Office of the Courts Administration CIO of Puerto Rico. Thecourts office is responsible for operating Puerto Rico’s network ofcourts, and coordinating the work of 338 judges and 14,000 lawyers, on350,000 cases per year.Their goal was to implement a common casemanagement system and approach to manage criminal cases across all 13regions of Puerto Rico.The aim and the result of the implementationwere not just to cut costs of delivery but also to revitalize theability to improve through “the intelligent application of IT.” The implementation case study and the CIO were profiled late last year by MWD Advisor’sNeil Ward-Dutton who examined their implementation of case managementtechnology and techniques.As an independent advisory firm,MWD writescase studies reports to illustrate best practices, specifically reportsthat are “designed to help organisations considering or activelyworking with Business Process Management technology understand howothers have worked to obtain benefits from BPM implementation, and howthey have worked to overcome challenges that have arisen along the way.” Thelessons learned with this case study illustrate key elements along apath to successful cost-effective implementations, including an emphasison a common language, collaboration and organizational changemanagement. As MWD explains, there was heavy involvement from the“line of business” for the CIO.In order to proceed with the solution,the CIO had to convince both Puerto Rico’s Chief Justice and the CourtsAdministrator. “They were convinced principallythrough understanding the value of the iterative approach to developmentand ongoing change management that would be possible, facilitating‘implementation by approximation’, rather than monolithic deliverycycles and abrupt handovers. The key convincing point was how thetoolset would enable a common language to be shared between the ITdevelopment contractors and internal subject-matter experts.” Further, the CIO and his team emphasized to all stakeholders that the solutionis focused on collaborative working practices.Perhaps most impressiveis that as MWD reports “Along the way, the organization is changing theway it conducts change projects.” Challenge Accepted, Mystery Solved TheCourts of Puerto Rico is just one example of the strengths that casemanagement can bring to help CIOs successfully meet the challenge ofdelivering new services. I like how one of the current CIO.comHall of Famers, Steve Rubinow, former CIO of NYSE Euronext and currentCIO of FX Alliance, explains a not so mysterious path to success: “It is the ability to handle, and spark, major business shifts that determines a CIO’s effectiveness.” AsI see the continuing challenges CIOs will face both in the public andthe private sector, my conclusion is that successful CIOs will leveragecase management because it can enable them to: Align with their “line of business” objectives Implement iterative results in 6-18 months Respond to the shifting business needs and regulatory climate And, inevitably, deliver valuable new services to the enterprise and their customers. Case closed. Image courtesy of Kuzma (Shutterstock) Editor’s Note: If you didn’t notice, Deb is an authority on all things adaptive case management. To get more of her insights, read The Past, Present and Future of Case Management About the Author Deb Miller is Director of Industry Marketing at OpenText. Her work focuses on industry strategies for enterprise informationmanagement and business process improvement. Her career includes morethan 20 years of global industry experience with GE. You can follow Deb @DebsG360 on Twitter.

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Fax Content: Fast and Easy Search and Retrieval

When used with OpenText RightFax, Microsoft Search Service within Outlook benefitsusers because it pre-indexes emails and attachments to deliver search resultsfaster. In Microsoft Exchange- and Outlook-connected RightFaxenvironments, the majority of inbound faxes are routed as PDFs to a user’sOutlook account. Faxes routed as normal PDFs are basically fax images embeddedin a PDF file, thus limiting the ways in which you can work with thisinformation. There is no option to copy or search text while in the PDF. You can use the Microsoft Search Service and the RightFax Searchable PDFModule together to gain this functionality. This solution enables users to search and retrieve data directly from the faxdocument, giving instant access to information including: Purchase order (PO) numbers Product numbers Case numbers Financial services transaction numbers Benefits The OpenText RightFax Searchable PDF Module enables users to search for basiccontent in fax messages. This means: No complex OCR, DMS or archiving solutions required for basic full-text OCRsearch Use your exisiting Outlook search tool to find and retrieve data fromfaxes Scalability If the basic full-text RightFax OCR search capability does not meet therequirements for your business solution, you have other options. A RightFaxserver can be extended by other OpenText applications, or even third-partyapplications. Some of the OpenText applications include: OCR: OpenText Capture Center (OCC) applies document recognitionfunctionality to classify document types (e.g. to determine if a fax is aninvoice, insurance claim, order entry, application form, customer feedback, orother defined document type). Capture Center then extracts business data fromthe digital image using Optical Character Recognition (OCR), IntelligentCharacter Recognition (ICR), and Intelligent Document Recognition (IDR). BPM: OpenText MBPM (Metastorm BPM) is the industry-leading solutionfor rapid design and deployment of process solutions for mission criticalbusiness applications. It delivers the insight, power and agility companies needto make their vision for business improvement a reality. To respond toincreasing competitive pressures, regulatory changes and customer demands,companies today are looking for ways not only to increase their effectivenessand efficiency but also to become more capable of change than they aretoday. Archiving: OpenText Alchemy manages all faxed documents and data in anelectronic file cabinet; a document system that lets you securely file, archiveand find every document, regardless of its original source. Conclusion The RightFax Searchable PDF Module in combination with MSOutlook fits seamlessly into Outlook-related process handling and gives usersbetter control over their fax content. This simple-to-implement solution is limited to full-text OCR and, alone, cannot verify or classify documents. But if data capture and processing is a keyneed, the logical extension here is OpenText Capture Center. OCC includes allthe necessary functionality for an extensive OCR solution for enabling a morecomplex inbound fax workflow.

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The Case Management Top Influencers Study: Why We Did It

Submitted by: Michelle Dufty on: October 26, 2012 Have you ever wondered who are the most influential individuals indriving Case Management adoption? Who are the key influencers in drivinggrowth and knowledge in the Case Management community? Who is drivingthe ideas to evolve Case Management to be a more strategic businessplatform? As a company who has a vested interest in the expansion and success of Case Management, OpenTextwanted to know. We felt that if we had this knowledge it would help usdecide who to partner with and where to make our investments. Thequestion then became one of “how”. A simple survey would be one approach. But would that really tell useverything we wanted to know? So we turned our focus to anotherapproach: What if we could find the most influential voices in the CaseManagement community and work with them? OpenText had been successful identifying the top influencers in thebusiness process management (BPM) and SharePoint market working with acompany called Influencer50. As I mentioned in yesterday’s article, The Case Management Top Influencers Study: Who are the main influencers in Case Management?, Influencer50 is a team of independent analysts who find the top influencers in select markets. Our BPM and SharePoint studies were a huge success for us as ithelped to identify who our customers trusted when they were makingdecisions around business process improvement and implementingSharePoint. Because we were seeing a lot of companies looking toleverage Dynamic Case Management as a strategic business processplatform, we wanted to repeat this success for the case managementmarket. Understanding who our customers — and potential customers — lookto as “trusted advisors” makes it easier for us to identify who we wantto work with in a number of key areas such as our customerimplementations, product strategy, and education. By identifying who the top influencers are in the Case Managementcommunity, we can also do our part to proliferate their good ideas andwork in partnership to support their community expansion efforts. Forexample, we are working with several members of the community (names tobe revealed in the following weeks) on an educational series, guides,and webinars around how to know if case management is right for you andwhat features are critical to achieve success. OpenText believes in the spirit of community and that the more people with great ideas, the better. “Influencers”, by definition are people whose actions or opinions have an effect on someone else. Interacting with the top influencers in the Case Management Communitycan help us identify what the “best of the best” are doing right tolearn, grow, and share their ideas.

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The State of the Art in Records Management – Part 2

In my previous blog, the State of the Art in Records Management – Part 1, I discussed the new market drivers for records management: eDiscovery/Compliance Audit Readiness Big Bucket Retention Schedules The New Definition of a Record The Obama Managing Government Records Directive In this blog, I will cover the vendor response to these new market drivers. As recently as five years ago, customers often had to build custom integrations between “best of breed” products to achieve an enterprise class solution for ECM and RM. This approach is expensive, and once accomplished it is expensive and difficult to modify, expand or upgrade. It did work, however, and the resulting solutions often provided significant return on investment. The challenge with these systems is to adapt to rapidly changing technology and new market drivers. Over the past five to ten years there has been a frenzy of acquisitions by the major players, resulting in market consolidation. IBM, OpenText, EMC, Oracle, and HP have now consumed most of the independent vendors in the Enterprise Content Management space. For example, IBM purchased Tarian Software, FileNet and DataCap; EMC purchased Documentum and Captiva; HP purchased Autonomy and Tower Software; OpenText purchased Hummingbird, Metastorm, Captaris, Vignette, RedDot and Global 360, and Oracle purchased Stellant and Fatwire (this is only a small sample). Over 100 formerly independent vendors are now consolidated into the top five. Many of those custom integrations have been affected by the market consolidation. Some of those best of breed products are now owned by different companies and future compatibility with custom solutions may be in question. As a result of market consolidation, major vendors are now offering comprehensive ECM suites that offer a broad set of features and functions. Customers can purchase those suite components they need, and they can add others as needed without (theoretically) having to develop significant custom integrations. Some of the key feature sets now available as components, or “modules”, of ECM Suites include: Records Management as a component of a larger ECM solution Combination of Electronic and Physical Records Management, with DoD 5015.2 Email Archiving and Email Management, with Records Management (Exchange, Lotus Notes, GroupWise and now Google) Integration with MS SharePoint and MS Office Business Process Management, Workflow, Business Process Analysis Auto Classification Litigation Holds, Litigation Support Enterprise Storage Architecture Document Management with Version Control Integration with Key Business Applications such as SAP and Oracle Basic and Advanced Search, Full Text Search Advanced Reporting and Business Analytics Digital Asset Management Web Content Management, Portals Social Media Management and Governance Mobile Extensions to phones and tablets Capture of paper, fax, and electronic input streams Electronic Forms, E-Signature Output Management On Premise or Cloud Hosting This suite approach is designed to allow customers to address the full complement of requirements, driven by the market drivers outlined in Part 1 of this blog, using a homogenous set of modules. Users can implement point solutions and add new applications without having to re-architect the infrastructure. Customers can purchase the various components from a single vendor and thus manage contracts and support much more easily. Software upgrades (again, theoretically) can be managed in a much more harmonious manner because the components are all from the same code or solution base. This is all good news for organizations that are planning to implement enterprise solutions. Technology has kept up with the new market drivers and vendors are offering solution suites that address user needs. For Federal agencies that are making plans to move to a completely digital records environment by 2019, as the new NARA/OMB directive mandates, available solutions from companies such as OpenText are ready to meet the opportunity. Customers must challenge their vendors during the selection process to prove that all of these components do indeed work together as advertised. Having said all that, successful solutions are not based on technology alone. Clear requirements, budget, resources, change management, operational support, training and all of the intangibles are necessary to make deployments as successful as envisioned. In this new technology suite, Records Management becomes an integrated component of the overall solution. Ideally records classification is performed automatically upon indexing of content within a business process. The new Big Bucket Retention Schedule facilitates efficient use of automated technologies to classify records. Automated tools such as Auto Classification are used to classify large volumes of content such as email and file shares. Business transactions are automated using Business Process Management, and all related documents and email are automatically stored and classified. User classification of content, strictly for Records Management purposes, is kept to a minimum. Information Governance is applied when content is created, captured or ingested, making RM part of the DNA of business applications. Email, instant messages, social media, correspondence of all types, reports, and more are all managed by the solution, including physical files. Searches are media neutral, and when electronic content is located it can be retrieved if a user has the proper system privileges. If the content is a physical file, then the system should indicate the location of the file and offer check out and check in features. All business transactions, if the system is fully implemented, include a full audit trail of ancillary original documents that facilitate audits, FOIA requests, and discovery. Public or customer facing transactions provide better customer service. Elimination of paper from the organization, as mandated by the Obama directive for Federal agencies, results in very significant cost savings – for storage, staffing, user productivity, and transaction cycle times. Fully digitized records and business processes result in shorter cycle times and huge productivity and cost savings. So, as you can see, the new market drivers are being addressed by technology in a way that makes it quite reasonable to implement enterprise wide solutions that provide a rapid return on investment with a high rate of success, establishing an infrastructure that can evolve and grow over time.

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Why the “RMA” is No Longer Relevant

The Records Management Application (RMA) as defined in days past is now an anachronism. The traditional RMA was a back-end system that only managed records once they were declared. This “view from the basement” approach is fraught with issues such as lack of funding, lack of resources, and low organizational priority. I have been to dozens of seminars and conferences devoted to Records Management and they consistently refer to the RMA as if it is a stand-alone system out of context from the mainline business of an organization. In today’s world, driven by issues such as eDiscovery, audit readiness and compliance, this is no longer the case. The industry has transformed from Records Management to Information Governance. Content must be governed from the time it is created, captured or ingested. ALL content must be governed, not just declared records. Transitory records must be explicitly classified so that they can be destroyed according to policy. This new paradigm, called Content Lifecycle Management, addresses building Information Governance into all mainline business processes. Enterprise Content Management suites now include Records Management as a subset of functionality so that it is built into the DNA of business transactions in a way that is transparent to end users. For example, a workflow process supporting a contracts management effort automatically saves all documents into the ECM system, including metadata that is part of the workflow process. Saved documents are classified automatically according to document type against the retention schedule, using this metadata. No individual has to “declare” a record; it is done as a function of the business process. The benefit to the organization is that they now have a full audit trail of each business transaction that can be used for legal discovery, litigation holds, audits, and more. Transitory documents and email are destroyed according to published policy and therefore the organization benefits from lower storage and discovery costs. Potentially HUGE cost savings are realized through lower discovery costs, lower sanctions and fines, and via the ramifications of NOT failing audits due to lack of documentation. Auto Classification and eDiscovery tools are now included in some ECM suites, so organizations can now deploy tightly integrated solutions that encompass the majority of Information Governance requirements. Business Process Management (BPM) tools orchestrate business processes to marry business transactions with unstructured content that bridges information silos that include ERP systems such as SAP, custom database applications, email, collaboration tools, mobile and social media. BPM, for example, is a mainline technology that is funded at the highest levels in an organization to improve productivity and lower transaction costs that are essential to most organizations. Deploying BPM as part of an ECM suite that includes this complete audit trail of transactions and records is now the state of the art in our industry. RM is essential to this approach, but it is an integrated component, not a stand-alone system. Yes, the traditional back-end RMA is DEAD.

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Being Human: Why Knowledge Workers Need Adaptive Case Management

This is a CMSWire cross post by: Deb Miller on: June 7, 2012 How important is the human factor in driving meaningful process improvements for your business? I believe it is THE most important, and arguably the most difficult, aspect of any effort to improve performance. Irecently participated in an educational virtual summit aptly titledACMLive that considers what it takes to properly support human knowledgework. I share some of the ideas discussed at that summit in thisinstallment of my ACM article series, and take a look at ways that Adaptive Case Management is helpingBusiness Process Management (BPM) practitioners succeed with the complextask of involving people in process improvement. Dealing with the Complexities of Knowledge Work Let’sfaceit, Being Human** can be very complex, and knowledge work can be a difficult place for a BPM practitioner to try to apply automation for process improvement. I have had any number of discussions about automating manual processes to remove people from the workflow. Great idea, I always say, and a perfect fit when the work is structured, well-defined and highly repetitive.A BPM practitioner’s responsibility though is to provide the environment, technology and information to enable the full continuum of work. Adaptive Case Management can help us dealwith complex knowledge work — work that is unstructured, driven by external events, responsive to exception handling and dependent on human judgment to meet business objectives. One of my colleagues and an expert BPM practitioner Dan Crow delivered a case management demonstration at ACMLivewith the theme of “Building a 360 Degree View for Signature Customer Experiences” and spoke to the issues of knowledge worker performance.As is true in our everyday lives, the ability to deal with complexity can make all the difference in our performance. Dan explains howproviding autonomy for the knowledge worker toaccomplish their goalsusing their best judgment is a central tenant ofadaptive casemanagement, and hisdemo shows how ACM can be used tocreate aneffective environment to deal with the complexities of openingandmanaging a customer account for Financial Services institutions. As Dan emphasizes, the result is that ACM can allow customer representatives to perform their work in a timely and accurate manner with contextual information, enabling them to make better decisions on behalf of their company and their customers. Transforming How Knowledge Work Gets Done Tom Koulopoulos (@TKspeaks), our ACMLive host and the Chairman and Founder of Delphi, maintainsthat ACM represents a radical new approach for managing digital work — asrevolutionary today for the way we work as the Internet was to thewaywe share and connect. We know that case management conceptsandtools have been around for quite some time and certainly the notionofan electronic case folder as a means for organizing documents and related work is not new. What is new and quite interesting to me is the way the latest generation of adaptive case management solutions can transform how work gets done by incorporating current technologies and capabilities for goal-directed knowledge workers. As ACMLive describes it, “where cloud, big data, mobile and social computing intersect with dynamic process and knowledge management.” ACM can be a transformative model for enterprise architecture as well. Our ACMLive keynoter Nathaniel Palmer (@nathanielpalmer), noted author andpractitioner for process improvement, BPM and adaptive case management, sees ACM at the heart of Information and Communication Technology(ICT)transformation. As the Chief Architect for some of industry’s largest BPM and SOA projects, Nathaniel shared his first hand experiences and vision for the“Futurprise Architecture” — the evolution of enterprise architecture into anevent-driven, goal-seeking and capability-focused delivery model for modern ICT. Unleashing the Power of Knowledge Worker Collaboration Attheend of the day, technology plays a powerful role in process improvement.We just need to keep in mind that the scenario is not always automating humans out of the process but rather may often be making humans more effective in the process. My colleague Steve Russell talks about this at ACMLive, making the point that driving effective human interaction — byenabling“smarter workers” to collaborate — has an enormous ability to positively affect business outcomes, including “Using Case ManagementtoDeliver Signature Customer Experiences.” ACM and “social” collaboration capabilities combined can help transform customer facing knowledge worker intensive processes like insurance claims adjusting, customer on-boarding, credit claims disputes and more.Steve has also written on this subject and the intersection of social technologies and knowledge worker collaboration. Summarizing his chapter in the book “Social BPM: Work, Planning and Collaboration under the Impact of Social Technology,” Steve says, “Social technologies exist to accelerate social conventions that people already participate in. When evaluating how participants work within a process, how they collaborate and access information should be a part of that analysis. ” Providing knowledge workers with a network of easily accessible experts and consultants creates a framework for sharing and learning from their peers. By integrating collaborative capabilities into case management applications, these collaborations can be contextual for better decision making, transaction specific information can be shared, and the collaboration itself can be captured for future audits. And,speaking of learning from a network of experts, ACMLive was a great opportunity for me to hear about how case management can help with the complexities of “being human” for today’s business process improvements, and also spend some time considering where it might lead in the future. I’ll share more on this subject in my next article installment, so stay tuned. ** Being Human is the name of a popular SyFyseries, are-imagining of the acclaimed BBC original series,that shows three 20-something roommates — a ghost, a vampire and a werewolf — struggling with their “personas” while also helping each other navigate the complexities of the world. Follow me on Twitter @DebsG360

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Gartner BPM: A view from a Sales Engineer

Submitted by: Theodore Papailiou on: May 16, 2012 Three weeks ago I was asked to attend the Gartner BPM Summitto work my company’s both. Over the years I have developed a love/haterelationship for these events.On the one hand, I love talking toattendees and learning about their work, the challenges they face, andthinking about how we “BPMers” can help solve their problems. On theother hand, I dread the long hours on my feet thinking about all thework that is piling up while I’m here. This year was no different; I was excited to talk about all the new great advancements in the BPMspace: Social BPM, Mobile and Cloud computing, just to name a few (stilldreading the work pile up). Well, the craziness started around noonTuesday and attendees swarmed the exhibition hall to see all thevendors’ offerings. I had great conversations with users from everyindustry, representing a variety of roles and including existingcustomers as well as competitor customers – all eager to exchangeknowledge and hopefully walk away with new ideas. Butthis year, I noticed (for the first time?) that I was talking to a lotof “newbies” in the space (this was also clear from the number of badgesthat had BEGINNER ribbons on them). Managers, CIO’s, it didn’t matter;they were all looking to understand what BPM is and how it will helpthem. The surprising point here is that in most cases, those with whom Imet were overwhelmed and timid about BPM, which made me wonder: “Havewe overcomplicated our message?” If you looked around the exhibit hall,the vendor boothswere decked out with fancy acronyms and aggressivepromises, all touting advanced, seemingly, futuristic and complexcapabilities, so I think in some ways, in an effort to differentiate andhighlight our technology capabilities as vendors, weconfused the verybasic message that BPM really isa management discipline. It’s how anorganization gets work done. At its core, BPM is about drivingbetter business outcomes for an organization by improving processes,optimizing and maximizing resources and simplifying work. It isimportant for beginners to really understand the value of BPMand how it can transform the way work gets done.On the vendor side,we talk about BPM technology as being about more than process automation– it’s about enabling continuous process improvements.And, we do seethat companies who are using BPM solutions to support a well definedbusiness strategy are yielding the greatest value from their BPMsolutions.But the fact is, automating processes is exactly where manyorganizations are with their BPM efforts today and this is a criticalfirst step towards enabling continuous process improvements.While manypeople would say that automating a broken process is not beneficial, Iwould argue that there is absolutely value in seeing how and whereimprovements are needed.Automation provides this visibility. Forthis, it’s important to remember the most basic principle of all startsmall.Even the smallest process improvements can produce significantresults. Most of the successful BPM implementations I have seen beganwith a small process improvement project that they were able to repeatacross the organization. There are still a significant number oforganizations who are not yet benefiting from the value of BPM. Many ofthese companies will need to follow the industry’s evolution, albeit in acondensed timeline, and for this we need to continue to talk about thebasic values in our message and help the “newbies” join our growingfamily.

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High-Velocity BPM Comes to the Cloud

Submitted by: Derek Weeks on: April 24, 2012 Foryears, we have been known for our ability to rapidly deliver BPMsolutions to our clients. It is also known that as a result of ourintuitive user experience, many of our customers have quickly becomeself-sufficient in building a large portfolio of automated processesacross their businesses.Many customers have over hundreds processesautomated, supporting thousands of users. This ability to deliver highquality, high integrity process-enabled applications to our customers isa value that we’ve termed high-velocity BPM. And today, that value is getting stronger. /p> Aftermonths of development and planning, OpenText is bringing ourhigh-velocity business process management (BPM) offering to the Microsoft® Azure Cloud. Building on the success of our on-premise OpenText Shared Services Center solutionthat provides over 70 process-enabled services for IT and business, ourclients will now have the option to consider cloud, on-premise, orhybrid deployments. While the 70 process-enabled services alreadyaccelerate deployment and design initiatives, giving our clients theoption to deploy and deliver these services in the cloud furtheraccelerates their time-to-value. Following on the heels of our announcement earlier this year with Microsoft, we are really excited aboutdelivering this solution in the Azure cloud. I’ll describe a few ofthe benefits Azure brings to our solution below, but one of the best isthat when our customers choose to deploy in the cloud, on-premise, or inhybrid configurations, there is a single code base that makesintegrations, interactions and ongoing support easy. The Need for SpeedWhilevisiting many of our customers and prospects, I have heard themcomplain about the massive investments they are making to maintain ahuge portfolio of packaged applications for their businesses. Thebusiness executives are complaining that their IT organizations cannotupdate those packaged applications fast enough to keep pace with therapid pace of change happening in their markets and industries. In manycases, the same application is being modified with custom coding effortsto support localized business needs.And while IT organizations trytheir best to support the requirements from their business customers,they realize that every application change introduces more frailty andhigher maintenance of the packaged applications. In my conversationswith our clients, both IT and business execs are looking for analternative: they want to introduce changes quickly, yet maintain thereliability and integrity of the environment at a low-cost. Thisis where Shared Services Center is grabbing their attention. Businessleaders love the ability to deliver new or modify existingprocess-enabled services rapidly. For example, one of our clients toldme that they are rolling out 4 – 8 new services each week to supporttheir customers. At the same time, the IT executives there are in loveour solution as they get a common platform for delivering both businessand IT shared services that allows changes to be made quickly,affordably, and reliably. Cool, huh? While reading John Halamka’s CIO’s blog recently on dealing with the pace of change, he mentioned “If you aredoing business as usual, you are falling behind.” Change is everywhere.According to a recent Gartner survey1, nearly 30% of organizationsreported making changes to their processes on a monthly or more frequentbasis. An additional 37% of organizations made process changes on an adhoc basis. This is clearly a rate of change that most traditionalpackaged application environments can’t support. If your organization isamong those making frequent process changes, you might consider taking alook at OpenText’s Shared Services Center solution. More about AzureAsmentioned earlier, I am excited about the common code base between ouron-premise and cloud-based offerings. It just makes life simpler foreveryone. But that is not all Azure brings us. It also brings us theability to offer our software as a service to clients – bringing all ofthe benefits of our Shared Services Center solution without the overheadof deploying, configuring, or maintaining the underlying environment.What other cool things does Azure bring to the table? Here are just afew: Blob Storage,allows OpenText Shared Services Center to accommodate changing demandfor document and data storage, expanding and contracting to support yourorganization’s needs. Shared Services Center takes advantage of blob storage along with Microsoft SQL Azure to balance structured data performance with the need for unstructured data storage and retrieval. Justas our BPM environment allows you to redirect staff to better managechanging business demands and work assignments, Azure’sgeo distribution capability allows you to redirect computing resources to where they are most needed to better serve customers OpenTextShared Services Center is available in an on-premise version today, andwill be available via Windows Azure in July 2012.I’d love to hearyour feedback. Feel free to ask questions by posting a comment here orcontacting us at processspecialist@opentext.com.

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Must-See Guide to #GartnerBPM!

Submitted by: Process Matters Blogger on: April 16, 2012 It’sthat time of year again – the Gartner BPM Summit – where all of thebusiness process management (BPM) gurus are set to gather together inBaltimore to discuss what is going on in the BPM world. The hottopics this year, not surprisingly, include case management, mobility,gamification and social media, and basic and next-generation BPM. Withan agenda packed full of keynotes, myriad BPM sessions designed for alllevels of BPM maturity (introductory to advanced) and user casestudies, it’s hard to decide where to start. We’ve taken a look at Gartner’s agenda and shortlisted the sessions we think are “must-sees.” Case Management Dynamic Case Management: Unifying Experiences to Transform Customer ServiceWendyKimball, Director, VSP, Kelly Romer, Group Manager, Intuit, and YaseminSezer, SVP, Software Engineering Services, L&T InfotechWednesday, April 25th 2:15-3:15PMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. Rapid Fire: Case Management: The Hottest Unstructured Process PatternJanelle Hill, VP Distinguished Analyst, GartnerThursday, April 26th 4:30-5:15PMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. BPM Success BPM FoundationsJanelle Hill, VP Distinguished Analyst, GartnerWednesday, April 25th 10:00-11:00AMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. BPM Best Practices of Highly Adaptive OrganizationsBetsy Burton, VP, Distinguished Analyst, GartnerWednesday, April 25th 10:00-11:00AMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. End User Case Study – Achieving Service Excellence: Making Every Moment MatterJorge Rosas, VP, Chubb Group of InsuranceThursday, April 26th 12:15-12:45View the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. Spectacular Success or Dismal Failure? Critical Practices for Getting BPM RightHelen Cousins, EVP & CIP, Lincolin Trust Company and Elise Olding, Research Director, GartnerThursday, April 26th 8:30-9:30AMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. Rapid Fire: Running A Proof of Concept to Ensure BPM SuccessTeresa Jones, Principal Research Analyst, GartnerThursday, April 26th 04:30 PM to 05:15 PMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. Metrics for SuccessFriday, April 27th 10:30-11:30AMJohn Dixon, Research Director, GartnerView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. Social media, mobility and gamification Keynote: Driving Organizational Success by Combining Social Media & Business Process TransformationAnthony J. Bradley, GVP, GartnerWednesday, April 25th 8:45-9:45AMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. Leveraging Mobility, Context and Communications Into Your Business ProcessesBern Elliot, VP Distinguished Analyst, GartnerWednesday, April 25th 3:30-4:30PMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. Gamification: Employ Game Techniques to Increase BPM EngagementElise Olding, Research Director, GartnerFriday, April 27th 10:30-11:30AMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. Expanding your BPM Strategy Time to Rethink Your Business Process Modeling StrategyDavid Norton, Research Director, GartnerWednesday, April 25th 11:15 to 12:15 PMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. End-User Case Study: Use Business Capabilities To Illustrate Crucial Investment DecisionsBetsyBurton, VP Distinguished Analyst, Gartner and Matthew Duncan, PMP,Senior Project Manager, Pacific Gas and Electric CompanyThursday, April 26th 9:45 AM to 10:45 AMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. BPM on the Horizon Intelligent Business OperationsJim Sinur, Research Vice President, GartnerWednesday, April 25th 11:15-12:15PMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. Technology Road Map for Expanding your BPM Efforts Teresa Jones, Principal Research Analyst, GartnerThursday, April 26th 8:30 AM to 09:30 AMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. Keynote: Business Process Management 2020Jim Sinur, Research Vice President, GartnerThursday, April 26 April 5:30 PM to 06:15 PMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here. Driving Differentiation with BPM & Application Pace LayeringMichele Cantara, Research VP, Gartner and James Holincheck, Research VP, GartnerFriday, April 27th, 10:30 AM to 11:30 AMView the session abstract and add it to your agenda builder, here.

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Expanding the Envelope of BPM

Submitted by: Process Matters Blogger on: March 16, 2012 Organizationalleaders face difficult decisions when it comes to balancing changeagainst ROI expectations. Does change justify the cost in terms of time, money and resources? At the end of the day, executives are lookingsolutions that can help them create and sustain an agile business whileminimizing waste. Over the years organizations have achieved atremendous amount of success by using business process management (BPM)tools to do exactly this. Increasing operational efficiency, swiftlyresponding to new compliance mandates, dramatically improving workerproductivity, eliminating bottlenecks and cutting costs are the oftentouted benefits of BPM. However, despite thousands of BPM successstories, many questions remain about how to get the most out of your BPMinvestment. A few weeks ago Clay Richardson Senior Analyst at Forrester Research, Nathaniel Palmer Editor-in-Chief of BPM.comand Donna Tellam, Director, User Experience Specialist of OpenText BPShosted a roundtable-style webinar in which they discussed some of thelesser-known ways organizations can maximize the value of BPM. Here are afew key takeaways that can help you achieve the best possible return onyour BPM investment. Start small, think big, move fastThemajority of BPM projects are mission critical in nature and thereforehave a much higher internal risk. Clay suggests that organizations startwith a project that is big enough to demonstrate clear value to themanagement team, but still small enough that it doesn’t put yourorganization at too much risk. With the right amount agility in yourprocess improvement efforts, you can rapidly drive organizationalchanges. For example, one company had a big vision for BPM. In order toprove the potential value of enterprise-wide BPM deployment to theirorganization they selected a specific project where they could engagethe line of business manager. The scope of the project was small enoughthat only a fraction of the users were affected by the change. By havingthe line of business manger involved throughout the entire project,they were able to fully experience and convey how BPM could transformtheir organizational operations. Once users catch a glimpse of what BPMcan do, the team is almost bombarded with requests to automate keyprocesses across a variety of departments within the business. Breaking alarge, often complex vision into bite-sized projects pieces can be aneffective way to demonstrate the incremental value of BPM while settingthe stage for how BPM can be expanded to support broader initiatives andgoals. People driving changeA compellingevent is often the catalyst for a BPM project. However, some of the mostsuccessful BPM implementations start with a person, rather than anevent, driving change. These process improvement projects begin with achange agent that truly understands the strategic value of BPM. Thischange agent is either in a senior management position or has theattention of senior management and is positioned to gain executivesponsorship. It is important for the change agent to collaborate withthe person responsible for shaping the BPM project so that they canarticulate the need and value of process automation.Securing the rightexecutive sponsor and team for a BPM project is also critical to thesuccess and adoption of BPM within organizations.This support must besecured from the outset and can make or break BPM projects. The metricsTodemonstrate value, you must understand and measure your success – whichcan be tricky. Successful organizations measure how effective they areable to transition their organization into a more process-drivenculture. You can do this by taking a look at the number of processautomation projects you do in a given year and how many of thoseprojects take advantage of BPM capabilities. As your BPM teamshifts its focus from the typical cost-cutting objectives that involveautomating the manual, mundane tasks and towards value innovation, youwill begin to see how these improvements impact customer-facingactivities. By improving core processes that would typically takeseveral days, weeks (or even months) you are better prepared and havemore time and resources to devote to delivering innovation, improvingcustomer service and getting products to market faster. If you arenew to BPM or want to squeeze more value out of your BPMimplementation, I strongly suggest you check out Clay Richardson’sForrester Report, The ROI of BPM Suites. For those of you craving more information, download our recent webinar and podcast which unveils the steps to taking your BPM project to the next level.

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A Rising Tide Lifts All Ships

Submitted by: Derek Weeks on: March 5, 2012 How BPM Can Increase Your Overall SharePoint Maturity Over 43% of organizations deploying SharePoint are looking topurchase workflow or business process management (BPM) add-onapplications for the platform, according to the 2011 “How Are Businesses Using SharePoint” survey. Like many businesses deploying SharePoint, usage within theorganization expands dramatically as users find it a useful place tostore, share and collaborate on content and information. As the base ofusers expands rapidly across an organization, the amount of contentwithin SharePoint begins to balloon. As the comfort level withSharePoint increases users tend to store more critical documents likeinvoices, claims, employment applications, loan documents, andcontracts. Users then want to utilize SharePoint to distribute, review,amend and approve this critical content. The more critical the content,the more people across the organization want to interact with it to gettheir work done. Thispast week in San Francisco, I was invited to present a paper with SadieVan Buren on how organizations can improve their SharePoint businessprocess maturity. The business process maturity level definitions wereestablished by Sadie in a collaborative effort with many people acrossthe SharePoint community over the past couple of years. In addition toher business process maturity definitions, the SharePoint maturity modelalso provides level 100 through 500 definitions for publication,collaboration, business intelligence, search, integration and more. Youcan find a copy of her maturity model here. During our session, we discussed SharePointprocess maturity at five levels, beginning with basic workflows (e.g.,submit a time off request) leading all the way up to advance concepts,including dynamic process execution, process intelligence dashboards,on-the-fly process changes and real-time collaboration between processexperts. Improving SharePoint Business Process Maturity View more presentations from OpenText Global 360 At the lower levels of SharePoint process maturity, users takeadvantage of workflows to approve an expense report or a vacation timeoff request. In these instances, users have little to no visibility ofthe workflow’s execution status. Daily or monthly reports are notgenerated on process execution history, few people collaborated throughthe execution of the process, and the process itself rarely changed. The interesting thing about our discussion was that as processmaturity increased in SharePoint, other maturity levels increased.Process maturity was the tide that lifted all ships in the SharePointecosystem. At higher levels of maturity process examples are less tactical andmore strategic to the business. For example, take a business that isusing SharePoint as an application platform to host operations like loanprocessing, accounts payable or new account on-boarding. For theseorganizations, visibility to process execution is critical for knowledgeworkers, management and business analysts. Process changes areinitiated by both SharePoint developers who are making changes to theprocess application or by managers who are changing work assignmentsbased on business intelligence metrics displayed within their view tothe application. Additionally, as process maturity levels increase, roles (e.g., caseworkers, reviewers, researches, approvers and supervisors) interactingwith the process are more specialized. We also see collaboration toolswithin those applications being used across those roles to speeddecision making. Sadie and I discussed that as SharePoint process maturity increases, so do the maturity levels for collaboration, business intelligence, search and integration. So, you might ask yourself – why is this important to the SharePointand business process community? For years now the SharePoint communityat large has been concerned with its accelerated use and expandedpresence in the enterprise. As SharePoint’s popularity has grown, thecost to support it has also grown – not only in terms of license cost,but in IT personnel required to support and maintain it, trainingrequired, hardware to run it, etc. As the cost of the environmentcontinues to expand, CIOs and other business leaders are asking how theycan get a better return on those investments. As the cost increases,people are looking beyond the technology strategy and are beginning toquestion the business strategy behind SharePoint. The same 2011 surveymentioned above showed that beyond user adoption and training, the lackof or limited business strategy surrounding SharePoint was their secondbiggest challenge with the platform. If your organization is seeking more value from SharePoint andlooking to resolve your business strategy for the platform, I stronglysuggest that you consider the adoption of workflow and businessesprocess as a key part of their overall program. Interested in learning more about SharePoint and process maturity,please visit our SlideShare site to get a copy of the presentation, “Improving Your SharePoint Process Maturity” that Sadie and I delivered.

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Does This Make My Process Look Fat?

How the people side of change impacts business transformation resultsPeopleare the hardest part of business change. If you want to increase thechance of success of change efforts, you need to emphasize not just thequality of the technical solution, but also the role that stakeholdersplay in the process change itself. Despite automation gains, industry processes are still heavily people and paper-oriented. So itstands to reason that changing the way business is done for the bettermeans finding new ways of handling information, revamping manualprocesses and motivating workers. To include the people side in ourprocess, change initiatives will require “fit to purpose” tools thataddress the user perspective. Process improvement needs leaner “fit to purpose” toolsWithcontinuing pressure from the global economy, organizations face anincreasing demand for lean tools to get more done with fewer resources. AsClay Richardson of Forrester Research¹ writes in his blog, “The shiftaway from ‘IT-centric’ inflexible solutions such as CRM and ERP willgive way to more dynamic business-centric solutions that deliver thesame process improvements with greater flexibility and adaptability forthe business.” Business process (BPM) and case management meet this demand as “fit to purpose” technology. Toillustrate, consider a customer enrollment process. Here there is aneed to involve and balance people, paper and automation. Human judgmentis also often required for exception handling or contextual decisionmaking. A purely rules-based automation technology to define anenrollment process makes it difficult to do anything more than track thestatus of a particular application using an attribute. This limitsvisibility into the actual process. The electronic forms capabilities ofmost traditional content management solutions doesn’t quite fit eitherbecause enrollment isn’t about the document itself but rather about thecustomer and all their supporting information housed in many othersystems. Indeed, most traditional packaged application solutionsoften ignore paper and focus on the process steps, glossing over thechallenge that the content itself presents. However, business processand case management fit the less structured, collaborative needs of theenrollment process and many other core processes quite well. Managingand controlling processes is what we are ultimately trying to achieve.To do this successfully will require our understanding and inclusion ofthe human factor. Processes don’t do work, people doAs Keith Harrison-Broninski aptly reminds us in his landmark book²Human Interactions: The Heart and Soul of Business Process Management, “After all processes don’t do work, people do.” Intoday’s knowledge-based economy, the fact is that most work processes,including the hardest ones to control, are carried out by people ratherthan computer systems. That is why leading organizations are includinguser work study and a focus on user interface designin their business improvement strategies.We can use this informationto improve and amplify human-driven processes and to better serve thecritical needs of our knowledge workers. For maximum results,solutions should have an obvious and direct impact on each individualstakeholder. McKinsey advises leaders at companies starting atransformation to put a priority on finding efficient and scalable waysto engage employees.³ In a digital era characterized by increasedcollaboration, organizations are shifting from a purely IT-centricstrategy to create dynamic, business-driven process solutions. Acritical element in that shift is the renewed emphasis on designinguser-centric environments and controls. User-centricity requires theavailability of context-driven content and the ability to supportknowledge worker decisions via the integration of all the pertinentdata, tasks, milestones, discussions, events, policies and processes.Part of the growing trend is the move to support more complex processeswith ad-hoc and less-scripted workflows by leveraging case management disciplines and technologies. Case in point is Univita Health. Business process and case management are critical to supporting theirlong-term care group, one of the premier suppliers of outsourcedservices in the industry. Univita traditionally had maintained long-termcare coverage as its base but had switched to a differentmodel—home-based healthcare – and needed to be more efficient inmanaging their knowledge work. With their solution in place,Univita automatically routes documents to a knowledge user who isresponsible for the related line of business. The document is evaluatedand classified based on the request type. The user can add the documentto an existing client file or create a new work case depending on therequest. The solution is integrated with the client information systemthat is used to validate the customer information. Once this vettingprocess is complete, the request is routed to a work queue based on therequest type where a knowledge user can select the work request. Asa result, Univita is able to prioritize work and match work requestswith user skills. Once the process is complete, the documents areautomatically archived but remain available in the event there is acustomer inquiry. Univita now has a workbench for their knowledgeworkers and a single point of reference for customer correspondence. The truth about people and changeWhetheryou follow Lean, Six Sigma, or a combination of disciplines, one truthwe all recognize is that people are the hardest part of business change. I have learned from experience how important it is to consider theusers’ point of view. This is especially true for less prescriptiveprocesses, where work is centered on and driven by the processparticipants. Perception is reality – if the process change is perceivedas unfavorable then it will be so. To be successful then we need todesign the user experience to serve each participant role, includingfocus on the all important customer role. And, if you want toincrease the chance of success and accelerate the implementation ofchange efforts, you need to emphasize not just the quality of thetechnical solution, but also the role that stakeholders play in theprocess change itself. One of my favorite examples is the business transformation at Irish Life, They are one of Ireland’s largest and most successful financialorganizations and the market leader in the provision of life, pensionand investment products. Irish Life was drowning in paper and, without astandard process, turnaround times were excessive. There was novisibility of where work was in process and the #1 customer complaintwas response time. Irish Life chose business process and casemanagement to remove paper and streamline their processes and balanceworkload, resulting in improved customer turnaround time andconsistency, management visibility into all work statuses, and a 35%improvement in productivity. To achieve their goal, Irish Lifeincluded the process participants and stakeholders in the improvementinitiative. By focusing on the user, Irish Life changed how their workgets done. In effect, they improved the workers experience, rather thanmerely speeding old and potentially ineffective ways of working. Froma people perspective the system has made a huge impact.While theenvironment is more controlled than before, employees recognize theimprovements in the way they work and the results of that work are beingdriven by the BPM solution. A key example is how they deal with‘problem cases’. The teams now have the correct information and thenecessary time to process the cases within the SLAs, which is clearly asource of satisfaction for the workers. In fact, with the improvedvisibility at an executive, management, and team level, it is notunusual to find employees now being proactive; asking questions like‘can we also do this with the system?’ With improvements implementedthroughout the business, Irish Life’s motto is now ‘today’s work donetoday.’ The Irish Life success is all about driving adoption rates andenthusiasm from the grass roots as well as top down. Evidence the CEO’scomment, “It’s been the best thing IT has ever done for the business.” Thelesson learned is that in order to drive operational efficiency andproductivity improvements, we need to focus our efforts to consider howpeople will embrace, accept and adopt change resulting from thoseefforts. Being user-centric and attuned to your stakeholder motivationsand solution needs will enable faster time to business value with changethat is also sustainable. If you are looking for more information about how to succeed with BPM and case management, I recommendthe “7 Steps to Process Mastery” eBook series as a good read for those just starting on the journey and a useful reference for those who are well on their way. References:¹ Forrester Blog Posted by Clay Richardson on March 21, 2010² Published by Meghan-Kiffer Press ISBN 0-929652-44-4³ What successful transformations share, a McKinsey Global survey, January 2010

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Exposing the value of BPM

Submitted by: Process Matters Blogger on: February 20, 2012 Inefficientprocesses can make or break your organizations ability to succeed. Eachyear organizations dish out hundreds, even millions, of dollarsleveraging the wrong resources to try and improve ineffective businessprocesses. Companies that are unable to adapt to new industryregulations, changing business models and competitor innovation arefacing the reality of failure. The bar is set high and now more thanever, consumers expect (and often demand) more from organizations. Asbusiness leaders look past slow-to-change packaged applications andtowards new ways to improve mission-critical processes, manyorganizations have started to embrace business process management (BPM)technologies. While the adoption of BPM suites increases each year, manyorganizations have yet to realize the rich benefits they can achieve byextending their BPM implementation beyond its traditional cost-cuttingfocus. Not surprising, Clay Richardson, senior analyst at Forrester refers to some of the major benefits of process automation as low-hanging fruit – whichincludes for example, the elimination of bottlenecks – such as dataentry duplication – to increase operational efficiency. Other benefitsinclude the ability to quickly and effectively respond to compliance andprocess change, improve worker productivity, and increase collaborationbetween business and IT.¹ However, as an organization’s understanding,awareness and use of BPM matures, many key stakeholders begin to realizethey can leverage these tools to continuously improve and transformtheir business. BPM has the potential to deliver significant ROIand transform your organization. According to Forrester Research, manyorganizations who have achieved significant success have shifted theirBPM priorities from reducing costs to improving customer experience andincreasing value innovation. These companies see a tremendous return oninvestment in the form of increased competitiveness, customer growth,accelerated time to market, and improved operating model flexibility. Organizationshave the ability to continuously improve and change the way theyoperate by using BPM. With the right information, resources and team,businesses can achieve a strategic advantage over the competition. Ifyou’re interested in learning more about identifying and measuring theROI your organization can achieve from BPM, I encourage you to join ClayRichardson, Nathaniel Palmer, and Donna Tellam on Tuesday, February21st at 11:00 AM EST for a free webinar on Unlocking the Secrets of BPM ROI. You may also click here to access a free copy of Forrester’s ROI of BPM Suites report. ¹Forrester Research, “The ROI of BPM Suites” by Clay Richardson, August 22, 2011.

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