Digital Transformation

OpenText Featured in the Financial Post

Early in September, I wrote about how companies can remain true to their culture in the fast-paced digital age. The piece was featured in the Financial Post. Here’s an excerpt from the article: “Digital will create the new corporate winners and losers, regardless of incumbency. It will create the largest labour displacement and migration in modern times. I suspect 100 million jobs will be displaced or migrated. A changing staff means a changing staff dynamic; it means we run the risk of changing what we stand for. …In my experience, the most enduring companies are those in which the corporate culture is so engrained it becomes the soul of the organization. OpenText’s culture, soul and vision lie at the heart of every aspect of our corporate mission: To enable the digital world. We help organizations digitize their information and business processes to gain competitive advantage and provide a holistic view of their operations. It’s a formula that’s continued to work for us amid unprecedented change and digital disruption, and it’s no coincidence it comes from a company with Canada at its core.” Read the full article.

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See Big Data Analytics in Action

Not since the mashup of chocolate and peanut butter have people been so excited about two great products that fit great together: Analytics and the Cloud. Earlier this month, OpenText announced Big Data Analytics in The Cloud,  an all-in-one software appliance built for business analysts that need to access, blend, explore, and analyze data fast without depending on IT or data experts. The need for Big Data Analytics should be obvious. Businesses need to understand their data requirements. They need to digest hundreds of tables and billions of rows of data from disparate data sources. With a powerful analytics tool on their side, companies speed up their time to value with the ability to integrate data from multiple sources to get a single view of their business. No complex data modeling or coding is required. They can clean, enrich and analyze billions of records in seconds and apply advanced and predictive techniques in a visual, intuitive way. But seeing is believing. This is why we have assembled a demonstration video that shows just how Big Data Analytics works and some scenarios that may mirror your own needs. Check out the demonstration here: And if you are interested testing out Big Data Analytics yourself, we have also a free trial available.  

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Data Driven Digest for September 18: Money and Finance

This week marks the 133 anniversary of the opening of the Pacific Stock Exchange in San Francisco. The establishment was created to serve the interest of businesses that struck it rich mining for gold during the California Gold Rush. Nowadays, businesses mine for data hoping to strike it rich by analyzing that data for clues about how to best serve their customers, streamline their operations, or gain a competitive advantage. In honor of those financial pioneers, this week we offer three different visualizations of financial data. Eureka! U.S. Fiscal Responsibility   In 1789, the United States established its first loan to pay salaries of the existing and future presidents and the Congress. As our friend Katy French (@katyifrench) posted in Visual News this week, bean counters in Washington kept great records and even produced stunning visualizations to represent trends. The graphic above represents the Fiscal Chart of Debt and Expenditures by the U.S. Government between 1789 and 1870. Note the spikes in military spending during the War of 1812 and Civil War as well as the first major accumulation of debt in 1861.   Euro Spending How do Europeans spend their paychecks? That was the premise of a recent data plot developed by The Economist (@TheEconomist). Based on data sets from Eurostat entitled Final consumption expenditure of households by consumption purpose, The Economist found life in the Euro zone is quite diverse. Living in Lithuania? Your budget is dominated by food and clothes. Lithuanians also spend more per capita on alcohol and tobacco than the rest of Europe. Meeting in Malta? Forget about eating at home. Nearly 20 percent of Maltese spending goes toward restaurants and hotels. Spaniards spend the least on their transportation. Germans spend more on their furnishings than their E.U. neighbors   World Population Based on Income Our friends over at Pew Research Center (@PewResearch) have come up with an interactive visualization based around the paradigms of income and how it relates to world population. For example, the map above shows the density of people living under what they term as a middle income. By middle income, that means your daily wages are between $10.01 and $20. According to the map, 13 percent of the 7+ billion people in the world are middle income. The map has a second option that reveals the percentage point change in that population between 2000 and 2011. It’s a fascinating study on both financial statistics as well as data maps. The income groups are defined as follows: The poor live on $2 or less daily, low income on $2.01-10, middle-income on $10.01-20, upper-middle income on $20.01-50, and high income on more than $50; figures expressed in 2011 purchasing power parities in 2011 prices.

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Digital Engagement: A New Business Requirement

Digital engagement isn’t an option anymore, it’s a requirement. Today’s consumers are savvy and fickle, and companies must work to earn their loyalty. They’re demanding more from the brands they love, and their tolerance for anything but a seamless, engaging, and compelling experience is flagging. In a digital world, organizations must digitize their customer journeys, from initial interest through to purchase and follow-on service or support. The best way to do this is to shift to a digital marketing strategy. One that creates consistent and compelling customer experiences at every touchpoint through omni-channel delivery, responsive design, and targeted communications and information. Digital technologies have introduced new customer touchpoints and increased opportunities to engage. Since consumers often use more than one channel to interact with a brand (in some instances they use five or six), delivering uniform and relevant messages across all channels is crucial for return on marketing investments and customer satisfaction. Omni-channel focuses on meeting consumer needs by pulling together programs to provide a cohesive brand experience across channels, platforms, and devices. To borrow from Bruce Lee, digital design should “be like water”. You put water into a cup, it becomes the cup. You put water into a bottle, it becomes the bottle. You put water into a teapot, it becomes the teapot. The same holds true for digital experiences. The transition from desktop to device to point-of-sale should be fluid. This is achieved through responsive design. Customers don’t see individual devices or channels; they look for a consistent and familiar brand experience that delivers relevant content. Nirvana on the customer journey is realized when a company anticipates the needs and wants of a customer and serves up targeted and tailored content, products, or services, in the moment of need, wherever the customer is. Organizations that can predict customer behavior have a better chance at fulfilling consumer needs. Analytics—or analyzing data collected across various touchpoints of the customer journey (transactions, interactions, social media sites, and devices) helps organizations discover valuable customer insights so that they can offer more personalized and satisfying experiences. The most effective way to target different audiences is to use messages that focus on products and services with the greatest appeal for each segment. Using dynamically generated customer communications, organizations can create and automate their marketing campaigns. When correspondence is part of a digitized process, end results are gains in efficiency and the ability to create superior customer experiences. As one of the foundational suites for Enterprise Information Management (EIM), Customer Experience Management (CEM) aims to create a richer, more interactive online experience across multiple channels without sacrificing requirements for compliance and information governance. CEM brings together all of the technologies required to re-architect back-office systems, consolidate customer data, and create digitized front-end experiences. Digital engagement starts inside the firewall and extends outside the enterprise and all along the supply chain. In the next post in this series, I’ll explore how the supply chain is being disrupted and how enterprises can digitize key processes for greater collaboration, information exchange, and business agility. Find out how you can capitalize on digital disruption. To learn more, read my book, Digital: Disrupt or Die.

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SIBOS 2015 – Our favourite agenda so far

Well, it’s this time of the year again. It feels Boston wasn’t long ago and now we’re looking forward to a great time in Singapore very soon. Last year’s agenda was spot on in terms of Corporate Banking, Real-time payments, standardisation and new distributed instruments; now we see various conference agendas looking at the first real-life examples and use cases. Diaries are filling fast, heads are spinning with the large amount of information to absorb and after that we know there will be that long list of action items to do at the end of the event. So, my recommendation here it let’s get ahead now and structure some best practices to make it all a bit easier. From one regular SIBOS delegate to another… I have tried to pick in advance which conference sessions I will attend, peppered with meetings and impromptu network opportunities in between. Not all sessions are designed for the pragmatic banker – my personal favourites are the ones showing real-life stories and lessons learned from Financial Institutions and Corporates. The key topics I would recommend you focus on are those that are the most relevant for the next couple of years: Enjoy Singapore the day before That’s the rule number one of any smart SIBOS attendee. Not only you can enjoy the prime location (roof of the Bay Sands Hotel anyone?), but also helps reduce jet-lag and assists with a good night of sleep before the event kick-off. Enabling innovation through ISO20022 Beyond SEPA and a couple of other use cases, ISO20022 enables innovation in a number of markets and banking services. The coffee machine That’s my second favourite activity really – especially with jet-lag, early morning briefings and late night events. Impact of real-time payments on banking systems & Straight-Through Processing We hear every week about the benefits of real-time payments for consumers, both existing and up-coming implementations, however we hear little about how Banks turn around their legacy middle and back-office payment processing platforms into true Straight-Through end-to-end machines. Networking Lounge 1 That’s always the best spot to sit down, rest the legs for a few minutes, write down the last few people’s names and key topics in my notes (useful tip – avoid writing on the back of business cards !) Practical examples of real-time payments for corporates Consumers and B2C is the original goal and obvious winner for real-time payments, however we’re not hearing a lot about “what’s in it for corporates and SMBs?”. This subject is slowly converging with the world of Treasury integration through APIs. Wholesale Digital Banking The digital experience is extending from the electronic exchange of information (payments, trade finance, securities) into the reality of client and counterparty communication and relationships. While there are a number of digital initiatives out there for self-service, readiness testing etc, where (and who from) do we see examples of where the industry is going with the biggest lever for revenue: human and social relationships. Come and meet us at SIBOS We are helping 250+ financial services firms as well as 55,000 Corporates and SMBs to meet unique client requirements, mitigate operational risk, and expand into new geographies with 600,000 Counterparties. Our experience in core financial service segments such as securities, cash management, commercial finance, card processing, merchant services and insurance makes for interesting discussions – so come and talk to us. We can discuss and debate how to reduce the cost and complexity of client delivery and accelerate speed-to-market and time-to-revenue with our real world experiences. If you are looking to do any of the following, let’s talk. Decreasing time-to-revenue: differentiate with operational excellence; add value for corporates, increase their business outcomes Regulation: overcoming the challenges of implementation and identifying new opportunities Digital Transformation: digitising transaction services processes; enabling rapid client on-boarding and self-service How to meet us? I and my colleagues are currently filling our diaries with meetings and conference sessions. Natalia Lokhova can arrange an appointment: nlokhova@opentext.com. We are also at the annual AFP conference the following week, so if you are there that is another chance to meet up.

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Analytics in the Cloud: No Hardware, No Coding, No Punch Cards

Data analysis has come a long way. The British Census of 1911 was the first to use automatic data processing with the advent of punch cards that could be sorted by machine. It was also the first census to ask multiple-choice questions, which helped Britain gather and analyze data on various segments, such as the number of carpenters compared to butchers in the country. Since then, data analysis has become so ubiquitous that more data is generated online every second today than was stored in the entire Internet 20 years ago. If your business is going to survive this digital transformation, it needs to quickly access, blend, explore and analyze all data without depending on IT or data experts. The good news is that OpenText is addressing those needs with the launch of its Big Data Analytics in the Cloud. To address the needs of companies seeking Advanced Analytics (a $1.4 billion market, according to estimates from IDC), Big Data Analytics has a built-in high-speed columnar database that provides thousands of times faster performance than traditional relational databases. The software incorporates statistical algorithms, making it easy to do profiling, mapping, clustering, forecasting, decision trees and more without programming. Delivering these capabilities as a managed cloud service reduces investment in infrastructure and maintenance staff. In a nutshell: no hardware to buy and no coding required. You can get all of your data in a single view and the ability to analyze billions of records in seconds. Powerful Enough For All Your Data Big Data Analytics is engineered to read virtually any data source. It includes native connectors for popular SQL databases, an Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) driver for creating custom connections, built-in ability to access flat files and CSV files, and a remote data provider option for loading files using a web address. On top of these powerful tools, Big Data Analytics gives everyday users access to advanced analytic algorithms formerly available only to data scientists. These tools and algorithms are optimized and hard-wired into the product and accessed via a toolbar in the Analysis window (as seen below).   Crosstab allows you to cross multiple data fields – either within the same database table or from different tables – and display the results as dynamic tables and graphics. Venn diagrams visually identify coincidences and differences between up to five data segments for rapid discovery. Bubble diagrams show the distribution of categorical data across two axes of numeric variables. A third variable can affect the size of the bubbles that represent the data. Results of bubble analyses can also be viewed in table form. Evolution analysis shows data progression over time. Visually, evolution analyses resemble bubble diagrams, but the spheres representing data move to show time passing. The user can freeze playback and adjust the time interval. Profile analysis groups values and determines relatedness to a profile segment. Users can easily see how individual attributes contribute to the overall profile. Results are presented in a table that visually represents statistical relationships (known as Z-score). Map analysis displays data on a choropleth map, in which different colors or shades represent the magnitude of data values. Multiple maps with region names are encoded in the product, and new maps can be added. Pareto analysis is the algorithmic expression of the 80/20 rule. It enables users to see if and how their data conforms to that rule.  If only Britain had this kind of technology back in 1911. Perhaps, they could have predicted the British Music Invasion of the 60s or that one day, Tim Berners-Lee would define the World Wide Web. To find out more about how to optimize your data for a digital future, I recommend attending one of the upcoming Big Data Analytics webinars on September 22 or October 15.

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Data-Driven Experiences ARE the Future

digital disrupt webinar

The Digital Experience market space today is being driven by Marketing and the CMO, however, the pendulum is likely to swing back toward the CIO and technology teams to help provide better insight into the success of digital transformation projects. Age of the Customer We have entered a digital world of consumer-centric business. Customers expect experiences that are personalized, contextual, mobile. In two words; Everywhere they need to be and Anytime they desire. There is no time or place that a Customer, Partner, Knowledge Worker, Employee, does not need to have efficient access to the information and services that they need or want. Role of Marketing and Data The essence of Marketing is to differentiate the value of products and services in the mind of the customer (buyer). Since every Customer is a unique person, each Customer is a micro-market of one. This means that organizations must be able to differentiate their products at a 1:1 level with customers at all times and in every context. Marketers have always been data-driven, but Big Data tools are enabling marketers to segment and predict behavior at a finer level of detail. As a result, there is no aspect of a customer experience that cannot be differentiated to achieve better results. For this reason, Marketing’s role is responsible for carrying out the mission to differentiate an organization’s value and in turn, this means that they will be responsible for influencing and messaging into every customer touchpoint. Data as Critical Ingredient to Digital Experiences Data tools are becoming more sophisticated and real-time, which enables reliable, high-quality data to be applied dynamically in any experience. From mobile devices coupled with geofencing technology to kiosks and wearable internet-connected devices, it is now possible to combine real-time knowledge of customer information (identity, history, preferences) and customer context (presence, local conditions, bio-feedback) with predictive analysis to deliver the highest value experience to a customer. For example, it is now entirely possible, data privacy aside, to know that Customer X has entered the NYC Macy’s department store from the 34th Street entrance and is standing in the Men’s Shoes section. Customer X has an elevated heart rate and it is raining outside. They just made a purchase in the store that included a rain jacket and have now re-entered the store. Therefore, something is probably wrong and the first objective should be to send an associate to meet Customer X at the entrance and ask how we can help rather than push promotions to this customer’s mobile device. In order to accomplish this, technology must provide the necessary services, including: Collection of any available/allowable data that may be needed as context Analysis tools to process the data into synthesized actionable outcomes Real-time Integration with experience delivery systems to create the dynamic experience for the customer, on any channel/touchpoint Decision support tools (data visualization/BI) giving business users the ability to find customer patterns, extract insight and optimize the experience The end goal of data-driven Marketing is to optimize the differentiated customer experience. Leading the Organization to a Data-Driven Enterprise The Enterprise is made up of individuals, who are each Customers in the global marketplace. The expectations and norms of Enterprise are heavily influenced by the Services they expect as consumers. Therefore, there is an unavoidable link between Marketing and IT as the service-provider to the Enterprise. The work of the Chief Marketer is to understand the needs of customers and how to optimize a differentiated experience for the most efficient commercial results. As a result, Marketing is leading the way to using data to optimize experience, and is training the same people who work in the Enterprise what to expect from their Enterprise systems. Because Marketing is directly linked to creating top-line revenue, the CMO will have the greatest mandate to operationalize data-driven, personalized experiences. As a result, the solutions created for Marketing and the Customer Experience will increasingly, and for the foreseeable future, act as the model for optimizing the Enterprise Experience. The CIO has the opportunity to connect, not only the marketing activities of the customer at the early stages of the relationship, but also offer the customer a connected experience across the sales and customer service departments as well. The CMO can deliver Data-Driven Customer Experiences and the CIO can enable a Data-Driven Enterprise. Data-Driven Experience as a Strategic Objective With the acquisition of Actuate, OpenText has identified the Data-Driven Digital Experience as the next evolution of the Customer Experience originally driven from the marketer’s initiative. Smarter experiences will be driven by analytical insight and tailored recommendations. B2B, Government and non-profit groups will also begin to adopt similar initiatives to improve the user experience and refactor their technology platforms to address the expectations of a digital native culture.

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Hyperion Research Cites OpenText eDOCS as an Advanced Solution Provider for Legal

I’m pleased to announce OpenText eDOCS has received esteemed ‘Advanced Solution’ designation from analyst firm Hyperion Research, including special recognitions of Market Leader and Highly Innovative in a number of key capability areas for Enterprise Content Management (ECM) solutions. Naturally, we are thrilled with this accolade from such a respected source in the legal community. And, our pleasure is compounded by how they define an Advanced Solution provider. Not only does an advanced vendor have strong market share, financial stability, a consistent flow of enhancements, and a strong record of client satisfaction, but they also demonstrate “significant strength in both product functionality and overall solution capabilities”. This last point is weighty when you consider the seismic impact digital technologies have had on the legal profession of late and the extent to which their information needs have evolved and expanded. • Over 65 percent of legal organizations manage more than 1 million documents each, with volumes that are growing at approximately 30 percent annually. • Email volumes are exploding and will eclipse document volumes in the next few years. • Matter content has expanded to include a variety of new file types (rich media, audio and video content, and more). • Content is stored in “silos” across the organization on shared drives, Microsoft SharePoint sites, and in cloud-based document repositories. • Two thirds of legal organizations report that less than half of their total content is captured by their DM. This unwieldy situation is pushing many legal organizations to the point of inefficiency and making them vulnerable to security and compliance risk. Technologies for ensuring integrated, managed, secure, and easy-to-access content remain critical. But it’s not doom and gloom, not in the slightest. These same technologies also offer incredible opportunities to make legal operations more flexible, efficient, productive, and profitable. • Mobile access to matter-centric content can bring increased flexibility and productivity to your legal staff. • Analytic technologies offer business intelligence to improve your processes, better serve your customers, and grow your business. • Digital business processes not only reduce the cost of managing paper, but streamline operations ensuring the correct version of content is routed, securely maintained on file, easily accessed, and disposed of in accordance with records policies. • Tight integration with third-party applications allows information to flow across the organization while governed and secure. According to Hyperion, these expanded capabilities are critical to information management and “legal organizations are actively seeking solutions that directly address these historical deficiencies in integrated approaches.” The information management needs of legal organizations are changing. Systems once deployed to create a secure and efficient home for company information must now evolve to address the challenges and opportunities of the digital world. They must provide the legal profession with a complete, innovative, and integrated set of capabilities to manage, govern, and harness their matter-centric content to better serve clients and bring full value to business operations. eDOCS is pleased to be recognized by Hyperion as an Advanced Solution provider with “product functionality and overall solution capabilities” that address the evolving needs of the legal industry and help legal professionals respond to the challenges and opportunities presented by the digital world. The full report is available for download on the Hyperion website, and the eDOCS summary is available here. For more information, visit our web content or contact us.

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Is Your Organization Ready for the Future?

Is your organization ready for the future? Meeting Customer Demand for Interactivity and Flexibility Consumer technology is changing at a rapid pace, and so are consumer expectations. As the lines between business customers and consumers blur, we can see the speed of this consumer technology evolution is impacting the expectations of corporate customers or business users. Business customers are therefore demanding higher interactivity and flexibility from their technology as well as from the information they receive and view on this technology. It is no secret that business technology has been slow to catch up. An example of slowly evolving technology can be seen in the banking or financial services sector, where legacy core banking solutions, bolt-on channel solutions, monthly statements, etc. are still as pervasive as 10 years ago. However even banks are now starting to realize that sending monthly statements is like taking 5 seconds in a 2-second world. So what happens when fast-changing consumer technology meets slower-to-evolve business technology? It creates a gap. A gap that if not addressed sooner rather than later, can cause even the largest organization to lose its stronghold on the market. A Peek into the Near Future As per recent data from Accenture, there will be: 25 billion devices expected by 2020 9 billion people accessing information through 4G-LTE networks by 2018 4 billion app users by 2017 9 Exabytes of mobile data being generated per month by 2018 This represents a huge number of devices, networks and information that organizations will need to be able to manage and utilize to show business value to their customers. To harness this information, enterprises will need the ability to access new and legacy sources of data, concurrently and in real-time. They’ll also need to be able to aggregate data acquired from these disparate sources and deliver the data while providing a superior digital experience to their consumers to keep them engaged and interested. Organizations will also need to create insight from all of this data to improve customer relationships and foster loyalty to initiate a cycle of continuous business improvement and growth. Adapt or Die! As per a recent poll conducted by OpenText, 77% of respondents rated their organization’s preparedness for entering a digital-first world as being between 2.5 out of 5. “Digital Disruption to displace 4 in 10 industry incumbents within the next 5 years.” according to a new report released last month by the Global Center for Digital Business Transformation (DBT Center). Customers expect much more out of their digital experiences, and the organizations that deliver will survive, and others will perish. Although organizational preparedness is at a low level, another survey by Deloitte indicates that 75% of executives indicate that their companies are exploring or adopting some form of Internet of Things (IoT) solution and believe that integrating this into their main business is necessary to remain competitive. Now is the time to get ready and look at what the requirements are to prepare for this digital enterprise. We are entering the digital age and information is becoming the currency of the digital economy.  No longer is it the size, scale, access to resources or geographic presence that drive the competitive advantage of an enterprise. It is the degree to which it can take advantage of information to innovate and grow. Information is the currency of this new world, and the degree to which organizations can take advantage of the information to innovate, grow and engage with customers, is what will determine who survives in this new world. OpenText’s mandate is to enable the digital world for its customers. To achieve this in an age of disruption, OpenText places priority on these three guiding principles: Simplify – Reduce costs, improve efficiencies and increase competitiveness Transform – Consolidate and upgrade information and process platforms Accelerate – Increase the speed of information delivery through integrated systems and visual presentation Learn more about how OpenText can help you unlock your digital potential – view our latest webinar on the subject or visit www.OpenText.com.

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Digital-First Fridays: Operating at the Speed of Digital

It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change. – Charles Darwin We live in a time of unprecedented change. In every sector, digital technologies are changing the rules of business by enabling new business models. Startups are reshaping entire industries, combining technologies like cloud, social, mobile, and analytics to deliver more targeted customer products and services. These technologies are empowering organizations to bypass the traditional costs associated with barriers to entry and connect directly with consumers to meet their needs. Startups are disintermediating the market leaders. Over the next five years, executives expect digital disruption to displace four out of ten incumbents—or 40 percent of established market leaders.[1] This is a startling prediction. Part of the reason why this will happen is because startups are able to operate and scale at a very fast pace, innovating very quickly—a pace that larger incumbent organizations (with their legacy systems) can’t match. This is the speed of digital and its potential is uncharted. With more people connecting and sharing ideas in a global, digitized marketplace, the pace of innovation will only increase exponentially. The formula is ten times the innovators at one-tenth of the cost and 100 times the power. Digital Disruption is Stronger and Faster[2] In a Digital World, the development of new products will evolve from sprints to hyper-connected dashes. Product features will be crowdsourced and collective. Feedback about consumer experience will be collected to upgrade features, improve delivery, and serve niche markets—in real time—removing the developer “safety net”. Every single disgruntled consumer will tell 1,000 potential customers about a bad customer experience. Brands will be built up and destroyed on social networks. Product ideas will be shared across yottabytes (one trillion terabytes) of data and millions of people, as innovation cycles are faster, compressed, and even approach the spontaneous. Business Models are Advancing Disruptive technologies are fueling a subscription-based economy. As business moves to the Cloud and mobile access becomes pervasive, the requirements for on-demand services are deposing the mainframe in enterprise infrastructure. Digital innovators are focused on creating exceptional experiences for the digital consumer and benefiting from a lifetime of customer value. As product experiences move to new platforms, companies are measuring their value based on recurring metrics over one-time metrics. In a Digital World, organizations will have to embrace digital disruption or they face the risk of losing market share or becoming obsolete. They will have to disrupt or die. To keep pace, organizations will have to reinvent themselves. They’ll have to digitize their information and operations. They’ll have to innovate at the front end to capture the mindshare of digital consumers and modernize their back offices to integrate their operations more efficiently across the supply chain. And they’ll have to restructure their IT departments to support a digital workforce. They’ll have to operate at the speed of digital. All of our customers have embarked on this journey of digital transformation. Here are a few examples of how they are disrupting their business using the Cloud, analytics, process automation, and mobile computing to simplify their volumes of information, digitize their operations, and accelerate opportunities for success: Mitsubishi Motors is outsourcing its B2B e-commerce capabilities to the Cloud and achieves stronger integration with its suppliers in Europe, without making additional investments in headcount or software. Dell Services is setting new standards of excellence within the IT services industry. Using analytics has helped them drive positive change, increase value, and improve engagement with organizations worldwide. First United Bank is using a BPM solution to help it achieve its goal of going paperless. To date, the Company has digitized over 200 processes and converted over 2.5 million documents and images into digital format for considerable business improvements, including overall growth and customer satisfaction. The City of Barcelona has a comprehensive digital strategy that embraces delivering more targeted and mobile services to its constituents, based on the innovative mobile identification system called “mobileID”. Find out how you can capitalize on digital disruption. In my next post in this series, I’ll explore what it means to function as a digital business. Read my book, Digital: Disrupt or Die. [1] “Executives Expect Digital Disruption to Displace 4 in 10 Incumbents by Industry within Next Five Years,” Webwire, June 24, 2015, http://www.webwire.com/ViewPressRel.asp?aId=198501 (accessed July 2015). [2] James McQuivey, “Digital Disruption: Unleashing the Next Wave of Innovation,” Forrester Research, Inc., 2013.

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Introducing Digital-First Fridays

Today, I’m happy to kick-off our “Digital-First Fridays,” a new blog series that describes a Digital-First World, provides strategies for transformation, and shares best practices using real-life examples. The series is based on our recent book, Digital: Disrupt or Die, authored by myself and OpenText Chairman, Tom Jenkins. In every sector, digital technologies are changing the rules of business. Startups and web-based companies are using digital business models to disintermediate the established market leaders. To remain relevant in a Digital-First World and gain a sustainable competitive advantage, organizations will be required to transform themselves into digital enterprises. Digital transformation requires a radical overhaul of enterprise strategies, processes, products, services, and relationships. Enterprise Information Management (EIM) empowers organizations to make this journey. How? At a basic level, it guides them through each phase of transformation, giving them effective ways to simplify, transform, and accelerate their business. 1. Simplify. Every organization wants to simplify its business. This is a constant challenge. Part of being a digital enterprise involves digitizing your information and automating your processes. In a Digital-First World, you can expect all of your business’ processes to be digitized. Automation will be critical—new research shows that nearly half of all jobs over the next two years could be automated.(1) As business evolves, we’ll rely more and more on machine-based or artificial intelligence, sensors, pattern analysis, and connections between all of these, brought together by the Internet of Things (IoT). Most organizations are already working toward simplifying their operations, indicated on the diagram below as “Present Day Followers.” 2. Transform. Business processes need to be agile to adapt products, services, and operations as customer expectations change—and they are changing. This requires transforming information-based processes and platforms to support digital consumers, a new workforce, a digital supply chain, and emerging technologies. To do this effectively, organizations will need to create an environment in which innovation thrives. Business and technology leaders should be ready to take risks, lead digital strategies, and define new models of engagement. Be ready for a substantial shift in culture to one that’s built on openness, innovation, and trust. Business problems should be examined and new processes created to solve them fearlessly and with imagination. If your organization is here, it’s already adapting to the requirements for future digitization. Building Blocks for Digital Transformation 3. Accelerate. This describes the rate at which we must undertake these changes, which may be daunting to some but, at the same time, it presents greater opportunities to serve customers, partners, and suppliers. Every organization will be required to rethink the way they’re engaging with customers, how they facilitate the workforce, and the ways they’re integrating and managing their information. The final phase of transformation relies on constant innovation. This can only be achieved by increasing the speed of information delivery through integrated systems. Digital Leaders have mastered this. They’re already redesigning customer experiences, overhauling their approaches to information management, rethinking their processes, and re-platforming their operations. Information lies at the heart of digital transformation. Its potential—if realized—is transformative. The challenge lies in managing enterprise information, making it accessible, and then applying it in new ways. EIM is the key transformative technology. Throughout the phases of digital transformation, a digital enterprise adopts EIM as its foundational enterprise platform for change. On “Digital-First Fridays” we’ll explore the future of digital technologies, their impact on the enterprise, and demonstrate how EIM equips the enterprise to brace for change in a Digital-First Future. Posts in the series will include: Operating at the Speed of Digital What is a Digital Enterprise? Information is the New Currency Digital Engagement—A New Business Requirement The Digital Supply Network Be sure to bookmark this page and join in the conversation. (1) David R. Wheeler, “Silicon Valley to millennials: Drop dead,” CNN, March 18, 2015, http://us.cnn.com/2015/03/18/opinions/wheeler-silicon-valley-jobs/?iid=ob_article_organicsidebar_expansion&iref=obnetwork (accessed April 2015).

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Top 3 Trends for Strong User Adoption

One of the greatest pleasures in my job is when I get to meet with customers and hear how they are implementing our solutions to drive business value in their organization. As we have recently completed our worldwide Innovation Tour, I was privileged to meet with several of our customers in different regions of the world and to be inspired by their stories. One of the common topics I heard our customers speaking to each other about is User Adoption and the change management that comes with implementing a new or upgraded system. Three common themes emerged as drivers to success for user adoption in their implementations. Pride of Ownership Successfully adopted systems have clear owners who take pride in the system and their role in it. When you hear the champion for a new system talk to peers about their implementation you can see the enthusiasm in their face. The smiles come out and you can see that they have taken personal pride in the success of the system within the organization. Whether the system is operated on their premises or in the cloud is not a factor in their level of ownership. The champion (and their leadership) have a personal stake in the project and show that clear dedication to the success of the system, to achieving their business goals, and to ensuring the users have a good experience. Broad Involvement Most successful information management projects include the business stakeholders in the process from the very early stages. They are involved in creating the business requirements and in most cases are key members in the system selection team. Stakeholders from a variety of roles are included, from those that are tied directly to the business success factors, to end users. The business groups partner effectively with IT throughout the evaluation and selection stages of the software and implementation partner(s). Once the system is selected, many organizations choose a broad team to take the system through the next steps, deciding on implementation choices, user experience, acceptance criteria and so on. Many of the customers that describe adoption success have used this phase to involve a broader set of user types and departments or regions, effectively expanding their base of information and their local evangelists. One of the other tactics involves “humanizing” the system. Many have named their system, often with a name chosen through a company contest involving employees of all types. The amount of involvement they have gained up front seems to correlate to system acceptance down the road. Names the organizations choose for their system vary widely but quite often with the information systems, the chosen name reflects bringing people and information together. With the new name, decided by contest, the system now becomes a ‘someone’ that people have a vested interest in helping to succeed.

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Digital Government: Saving lives by focusing on people

It’s refreshing to see some of the lessons for government that the agility of smaller scale shared resources can offer. This week in New Zealand brought stories of how agencies have begun to work effectively together and to focus on those they serve both to cut costs and to save lives in the bargain. Data-share may have saved life, Tolley says 5:00 AM Friday Jun 19, 2015 Anne Tolley said some NGOs had “flat out refused to be part of any information-sharing agreement”. [excerpted from the article]“…Better sharing of information between state agencies may have prevented the death of a child in a poorly-maintained state house, says Social Development Minister Anne Tolley…” As the caption above notes, efforts to share information, especially PII, are currently imperfect, but New Zealand already has begun cross-agency info-sharing regarding residents —particularly children—to provide a comprehensive view of developing issues or prevent problems from arising. Enabled by recent New Zealand laws, such sharing is already going on in Hamilton, where police, health, education, social development, and Child, Youth and Family officials are required to securely share any information which may be relevant to other agencies. The minister proposed that agencies like these, including Housing New Zealand and the Ministry of Social Development could also be a part of future agreements not only across government departments but including related non-profits and charities. Security of information in this process is critical, so information governance, whether of structured data or unstructured information in case files or emails is a foundational element and the New Zealand All of Government cloud provides the perfect medium for that process. Such pooling of information for good is not the only digital transformation the New Zealand government is exploring, however. One of the most dramatic new steps was outlined by the Deputy Minister of Internal Affairs (DIA), Marie Robertson, at the annual Government IT conference (GOVIS) last week. DIA has embarked on a new approach to services, eschewing the traditional agency by agency functional model of service delivery. They’ve started with a federate access and secure personal identity called RealMe (check out this entertaining video) which automatically migrated existing user IDs/passwords from 20 agencies to simplify enrollment for those who were already dealing with government online. Their delivery transformative effort embraces the digital consumer model—“it’s all about YOU” personalization of needs—rather than requiring residents to figure out what part of government can serve them and going beyond the single government portal approach to focus on life phases and the predictable events at each stage. It envisions layering government products and services along with information and data in supporting each life phase. The approach closely follows the central government’s IT strategy mandates of: citizen and business accounts offering personalisation and customisation; government information and services being joined up and easy to access through common customer-centric digital channels; processes being defined by end-to-end boundaries from the customers’ perspectives …. Moreover, approaching services this way enables a top-down view of the government and stakeholder continuum that can identify gaps. Robertson described New Zealand’s new BABII initiative, which brings together all the services around the birth of a child, from pre-natal services through early childhood, including those for mothers and caregivers, establishing a clear official digital identity for a child from the moment the birth is registered (soon, the birth could be automatically registered by hospitals or midwives? Who knows?). Of course, transforming service delivery by focusing on the consumer of services—personalization—is clearly the way of the future and New Zealand, as a member of the D5 (digital governments, get it?), is leveraging its smaller scale to experiment with innovative approaches. If it works, this new model will ultimately change the organization of governments as well—so across the world we should applaud such initiatives and watch their progress with interest.

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Digital Banking – What is happening in other industries? (part 1 of 3)

customer experience

The Financial Services industry as a whole – Payment and Cash Management especially – suffers from not learning and not re-using other industries’ ideas and best practices. As an anecdote, my current role focusses on one hand spending time with Banks and Financial institution, on the other hand with Corporate Treasurers. I still find myself explaining to Bankers on a regular basis procure-to-pay and order-to-cash cycles, getting surprised reactions when they realise they are just an “end” process to a supply chain process (I kid you not!). While generally speaking Banks understand their customers’ needs, individuals lack some basic working knowledge of their clients’ business or practical implications of a Banking relationship. The most regular occurrence of this “knowledge gap” I witness is around the Digital Transformation. Everybody talks about it, everyone has their own definition in Financial Services, however very few people really understand how non-Financial Institutions have already seized the opportunity. Yes, some Bankers are trying to re-invent the wheel as you read these lines. What is a Digital Business? A digital business is more than just a business with digital products that are distributed electronically: it’s a business in which digital technology is both pervasive and central to its overall success. A digital business is created using digital assets and/or capabilities, involving digital products, services and customer experiences, and is conducted through digital channels and communities. In a digital business, the majority of processes are digitized. This means that all along the value chain—from the creation of products and services to their consumption—employees, consumers, partners, and processes are reliant on digital technology for easy access to information, constant connectivity, and immediacy of insight. A digital business is characterized by an open, flexible value chain. In the transition to a digital business, organizations need to re-envision their business not as a standalone entity with a linear value chain, but as part of an extended enterprise ecosystem of suppliers from which customers assemble products and services according to their needs. Organizations need to participate in these ecosystems to deliver value to customers. By positioning products and services in the context of the customer’s value system, a digital business can grow its capabilities, leverage the capabilities of others, and open up new revenue streams. As part of a larger ecosystem, companies are more equipped to quickly pivot their operations to add customization or deliver new products to satisfy consumer need. They can scale their manufacturing capacity and shift geographies as needed to fill a specific order. In the future, these ecosystems will consist of low-cost suppliers and virtual manufacturers, be global in nature, and serve niche industries that span nations. Innovation will occur in hyper-drive, propelled forward by digital product development and marketing. Digital technologies enable new business models that are dynamic, flexible, and deliver value to both businesses and customers. Before we examine how the enterprise can reinvent itself, it would be helpful to examine the circumstances that are driving the enterprise toward digital transformation. The nature of digital technology Digital technologies enable new businesses models that are dynamic, flexible, and deliver value to both businesses and customers. Central to digital transformation is the ability to facilitate direct, peer-to-peer communication, collaboration, and sharing, without requiring an intermediary. This ability is already reshaping business as we know it. By providing direct, unrestricted access to information, knowledge, and resources, digital technologies empower individuals in ways not previously possible or even imaginable. Anyone with a web-enabled device can connect to a global network of expertise. They can discover individuals with common interests and goals. They can share ideas, collaborate, and innovate. They can band together and have their voice heard, counted, and taken seriously by those in positions of influence. And they can access new channels for manufacturing, marketing, and selling, and work with business partners located anywhere in the world. As individuals are empowered with new ways of working, traditional channels—and those who control them—will hold less importance. An inventor, for example, no longer needs to license their product idea for pennies on the dollar to a manufacturer. They can prototype the product with three-dimensional (3-D) printing. They can “crowdfund” capital costs using the Internet (collecting small amounts of capital from family, friends, or members in their online community). They can market globally through inexpensive and accessible online channels, sell through a digital storefront, manufacture small batches or distribute digitally. All this can be done in ways that are faster and cheaper and deliver new value to the customer. In shifting power and influence away from traditional sources, digital technologies are introducing opportunity to the masses. Businesses must acknowledge, respond to, and allow digital technologies to transform their operations from the inside out if they want to stay competitive and relevant in a digital-first world. Demands of the digital customer An increasingly connected consumer and the widespread adoption of digital technology has created the digital customer. Internet-based retail is growing globally at a rate of 19 percent year over year and, as more consumers move online, they are using the Internet to discover products, gather and evaluate information, and engage the buyer online for purchasing and shipping. An increasing number of channels are offering customers convenience, flexibility, and choice. They expect immediate gratification and engaging experiences that satisfy. The digital enterprise will support the omni-channel delivery of goods and services to compete and satisfy their customers. We have entered the “Age of the Customer”—an age in which digital technology has empowered the customer and shifted the balance of purchasing power from suppliers to customers. Consumers now have the ability to extract price, quality, and service concessions from the world’s most powerful brands. What used to differentiate the enterprise—economies of scale, distribution strength, and brand—have faded in importance. In their place, customer obsession is what gives firms dominance and drives their competitive advantage. For digital business, customer experience does not outweigh the need for operational excellence. In the second part of this blog, we’ll cover more drivers and practical examples of how other industries and non-Financial Services businesses approach the Digital world. We’ll cove the Generation Z, how non-FS businesses manage Operational Agility and deal with global competition and regulatory pressures.

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Empowering Government with a Digital Agenda

Like private businesses, governments are driven by information. Consider the amount of information associated with a single citizen: a birth certificate, passport, driver’s license, student loans, social security, health-related services, etc. Now multiply that across an entire population. If information is the new currency, then many government organizations are rich—so rich, in fact, that some don’t know what to do with this wealth (of information). The rate at which governments can effectively use their information as an asset is impacted by departmental or application silos. As illustrated below, information that should flow securely and effortlessly across departments, partners, and citizens is often disconnected and processes are fragmented. When this happens, governments don’t have a consolidated view of their information, which means they don’t have an accurate view of their resources, projects, or citizens. The result? Agencies work harder, not smarter. A digital agenda helps government organizations optimize their performance, without compromising governance and security. As part of implementing a digital agenda, digitizing information and processes is a critical first step. It lays the groundwork for collaboration and agility by removing silos that can hamper access and productivity—allowing information to flow freely across departments. Digital transformation requires coordination and collaboration across departments, sectors, jurisdictions, and policy domains; a host of changing relations and communication patterns; and a shift to citizen-centric service delivery. Implementing a digital agenda is critical. Broadly speaking, a digital agenda consists of three phases: Overhauling operations to improve efficiency and profitability. Agencies must reduce costs and increase competitiveness by digitizing their information and processes. Bringing agility into business processes to quickly adapt services and operations. Information processes and platforms need to be relevant for digital citizens, a new workforce, and emerging technologies. Delivering new services to citizens with continuous collaboration and innovation. Efficiency hinges on increasing the speed of information delivery through integrated systems and across projects. Many governments are making great strides in mandating the adoption of a digital strategy. Here are some examples of digital transformation at the federal level in government agencies in the U.S., Canada, and Europe: The U.S. Department of Justice (DoJ), Office of the Federal Detention Trustee (OFDT) has the typical mandate to do more with less. Their average daily population exceeds 55,000 prisoners in federal custody with an annual budget of more than $1 billion. Improving time and cost savings across the organization is paramount. By automating administrative activities like prisoner designation, OFDT has eliminated manual, paper-based processes and the use of outdated file-sharing methods (fax, postal mail and FedEx), at a projected cost-savings of $38.8 million. A Security Enterprise in the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) relies on an e-government process automation solution to improve its performance. The automated, collaborative nature of this solution enables the agency to efficiently manage 4,000 Foreign Military Sales (valued at $49 billion) while effectively fulfilling its mission and characterizing its motto: “Strength in Cooperation”. CIZ (Centrum Indicatiestelling Zorg) oversees the Dutch Ministry of Health, handling over one million cases a year and supporting over 18,000 users. Challenged by a lack of business process control around the handling of cases combined with siloed data (spread across 17 databases), CIZ implemented an integrated case management solution so they can adapt more quickly to changes in legislation. By digitizing key processes, CIZ has been able to meet their target of processing 100 percent of their cases, reducing costs and increasing citizen satisfaction. Transport Canada works with over 50 partners (including Crown corporations, port authorities, and airport authorities) to ensure a safe, secure, efficient, and environmentally responsible transportation system. Fulfillment of their mission is based on timely and informed decision-making. Transport Canada relies on a combined information and records management solution to enable collaboration with all stakeholders, including citizens. Through digitization they have consolidated more than four million records in a single library, bringing together 5,200 users across 117 sites—the largest single library deployment in the Canadian Public Sector. In a Digital-First World, governments will have to support digital business models with new processes. Whether by design or by decree, government organizations will be required to build an e-government infrastructure that digitizes information-based processes. In doing so, they will unlock the potential of information to empower both public servants and citizens, and improve their ability to govern in the process. Agencies around the world are already reaping the benefits of an integrated digital agenda—such as increases in productivity and revenue that amount to cost savings in the millions of dollars; easier access to information through complaint, standardized IT infrastructures; decreases in costs and inefficiencies with automated processes; and improvements in citizen relationships and satisfaction through innovative services. It’s evident that the rewards far outweigh the effort. And the technology is available. You can read all about how governments around the world are implementing digital agendas in my book e-Government or Out of Government. 1. Paul Tellier and David Emerson, “Seventh Report of the Prime Minister’s Advisory Committee on the Public Service,” Clerk of the Privy Council, March, 2013: http://www.clerk.gc.ca/eng/feature.asp?pageId=314 (accessed December 2013).

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Replacing Your Legacy Archiving System is a Pain. No More!

Large organizations rely heavily on rapidly evolving technology to thrive in today’s competitive business environment. And one of these vital solutions is the electronic archiving system, which is expected to maintain a comprehensive and accurate record of customer information such as statements, bills, invoices, insurance policies, scanned images and other organizational information that is essential to the survival and growth of the enterprise. It is critically important for modern organizations that these assets are retained in an efficient and intelligent manner so that they can be retrieved on-demand for customer presentation, compliance, auditing, reporting, etc. Like all information technology, archive systems too need to be upgraded from time to time. Depending on the requirements of a progressive organization, this could even mean replacing the existing systems with a brand new solution. The first step toward an effective solution, however, is identifying the shortcomings of the current system in the context of your evolving business needs. Here are a few tell-tale signs that your archiving system hasn’t been keeping up with your growth: Waning vendor support – It doesn’t receive enough attention from the vendor in terms of upgrades and support. Costly Upgrades – When it becomes prohibitively expensive to boost performance or add new capabilities/features. New Media Deficit – The system falls short on receiving and serving up content to the multitude of customer channels, including web, social, mobile, tablet, text, messages, email, and print. Social Disconnect – Perhaps the most easily recognizable symptom of an outdated archive system is the inability to connect with social media such as Facebook and Twitter accounts and capture and store customer information. Content Inaccessibility – Users complaining of an inability to extract data for targeted messaging, trans-promotional marketing, analytics, and other sales and marketing functions. Compliance Infractions – Inability to store or retrieve content that could lead to investigations, fines, license revocations, or lawsuits. If you can relate to one or more of these issues then upgrading to a more contemporary solution may be the best way forward. An example of archive migrations we have conducted for our customers and have extensive experience in is for the Mobius/ASG-ViewDirect® system. The challenges often highlighted for this system include some of those listed in the points above, as well as other issues typically seen in legacy archive systems, such as a lack of a coherent product roadmap, high costs, and an outdated user experience. Customers are often certain about the need for migration but are unsure about how to move to a new archive without disrupting critical business functions. The only real roadblock to improved performance then, is the migration itself. The process can be laborious and cumbersome, with key performance factors around the ability to perform complex document migrations on time and within budget, while maintaining access for existing applications, repurposing information locked in legacy document formats and meeting regulatory requirements. While enterprise IT departments have stringent migration requirements, modernizing your archiving system doesn’t necessarily have to be painful, and OpenText®’s ECM Migration service has a methodology in place to make sure it isn’t. The service provides a way to efficiently migrate content out of legacy archiving systems like Mobius/ASG-ViewDirect® and others to a more contemporary solution such as OpenText’s Output Archive (formerly known as BIRT Repository). Some of the unique benefits of using OpenText’s ECM Migration Service for Mobius migrations include the ability to migrate content out of Mobius without the need to purchase expensive Mobius APIs and the capability to read directly from the underlying file structure using the Mobius Resource Extractor, bypassing the need for Mobius to be running. Our ECM Migration methodology has been designed keeping best practices gleaned from many successful engagements and utilizes award-winning technologies to automate migration in a lights-out environment without disrupting day-to-day business activities. The ECM Migration team has worked with many ECM systems including IBM® Content Management OnDemand (CMOD), IBM® FileNet® Image Services, IBM®FileNet® P8, ASG-ViewDirect®, and others for decades, and the maturity of our solution proves it. Our technology and DETAIL™ Methodology enables us to: Manage all aspects of a migration Cut up to 6 weeks off of the initial planning Use standard logging on a single platform Provide multi-threaded support out-of-the-box Implement process flows, advanced logic and routers through drag-and-drop interfaces without the need for scripting Connect to and pool the connection with multiple databases and repositories Run processes concurrently, by thread or broken down by stage (i.e. Load, Extract, Convert) Handle massive volumes of data, documents, images and metadata So, if you think it’s time to say goodbye to your current archiving system, know that there are experts out there who can help you define your requirements and deploy an appropriate solution that will take you where you want to go. And remember – organizations that evolve, thrive. Others perish.

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