CEO Blog

The CEO of OpenText, Mark Barrenechea, shares his insights and observations on enterprise information management and the latest technologies.

Introducing OpenText Big Data Analytics in the Cloud

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Digital leaders know their data. They convert their information into actionable business insight. Considering that more data is shared online every second today than was stored in the entire Internet 20 years ago, it’s no wonder that differentiating products and services requires advanced tools. With that need in mind, I’m pleased to announce OpenText Big Data Analytics in the Cloud. Combining the power of our OpenText Big Data Analytics product with the accessibility and convenience of the Cloud gives our customers the ability to leverage advanced analytics capabilities quickly and easily, without investing in infrastructure or specialized technical staff. All About the Data To transform data into insights, organizations require a Big Data Analytics solution that is flexible enough to integrate all types of information, including survey results, tweets, purchasing data, campaign response rates, and external market data. An effective solution helps organizations examine all data in a single view, analyze billions of records in seconds, and apply advanced and predictive techniques—all via an intuitive, easy-to-use interface. Applying analytics to information across organizational silos gives businesses the insight they need to improve their performance, optimize their supply chain, and know their customers better. Big Data Analytics gives organizations the agility they need to compete. With benefits like these, my question is “Why haven’t more organizations implemented Big Data Analytics solutions?” The most commonly cited barriers to adoption of Big Data Analytics solutions are difficultly consolidating data sources, a skills gap within the organization, and lack of infrastructure, or difficulty integrating with existing infrastructure.[1] Not every organization has the data scientists, IT experts, and computing resources they need to collect, parse, compare, and extract value from data.   The OpenText Answer The new OpenText Big Data Analytics in the Cloud bypasses all of these barriers, offering implementation and full management in the OpenText Cloud, without requiring the customer to acquire additional IT resources or infrastructure. As our first “Analytics as a Service” (AaaS) offering, OpenText Big Data Analytics in the Cloud brings together the benefits of advanced analytics with the cost-savings and convenience of a managed service, making it even easier to access, blend, explore, and model big data quickly and effectively. The simplicity and flexibility of Big Data Analytics eliminates the need for a data scientist. The power of OpenText Cloud lowers technical and financial barriers to entry. Without lengthy procurement and installation processes, time-to-ROI is realized sooner. Maintenance is simplified and scalability is improved without driving up costs. Using in-memory columnar database technology that delivers 1,000x faster performance than traditional relational databases, OpenText Big Data Analytics in the Cloud reduces the time it takes to prepare and launch campaigns, discover supplier risks, or identify business opportunities from days to just hours or even minutes. It delivers quicker time-to-value because of the proven reliability and expertise of our Enterprise Information Management (EIM) Managed Cloud Services. With OpenText Big Data Analytics in the Cloud business users can uncover cross-sell or upsell opportunities or reduce customer churn, and gain better visibility to detect fraud, analyze risk, and drive operational efficiency. What’s Next? When it comes to analyzing data, many of our customers have made great progress. They have moved from rear-view reflections to near-view observations. But the traditional Business Intelligence (BI) tools that made that move possible have become table stakes. OpenText Big Data Analytics and the advanced and predictive analytics it embodies, represents the future of business and will be the key to continued success in a Digital World as organizations shift from near-view observations to future-view forecasts and analysis to make more informed business decisions. When I look at Analytics as a Service, I see the shape of things to come. I see limitless potential. To find out more about the new OpenText Big Data Analytics in the Cloud, read the Press Release.

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Why Information is the New Currency

We live in a digital world. A testament to this new reality is the growing value of digital content. People download songs, purchase movies online, exchange emails, and share personal information—all in the form of digital content. Information in its many new forms has become commoditized. In a digital world, information is the new currency. Will it replace the dollar, the Euro, the Yen? Not yet, but as information flows across networks, as it is exchanged and more metadata is collected, it grows in value. New businesses and whole industries are emerging to support the digitization of content. As industry leaders like Google and Facebook have demonstrated, opportunities to monetize information are abundant. Like money, data can be stolen. As information grows in value, so will the need to protect and manage it—and this will be increasingly mandated by governments and regulatory bodies. Many large companies (health care providers, governments, and banks, to name a few) are the gatekeepers of highly confidential, personal information. They are susceptible to information leaks. In a digital world, how will government and regulators monitor and protect the huge amounts of personal data stored in the Cloud?  As society becomes digital and the Internet propagates a faster pace of crime, organizations will need to focus on the development and enforcement of governance policies, standards, and systems to prevent identity theft and online fraud. The mass digitalization of products, services, processes, and overall business models will demand a disciplined approach to managing, governing, and innovating with information. Enter Enterprise Information Management, or EIM. EIM is a set of technologies and practices that maximize the value of information as it flows across networks, supply chains, and organizations. Its core technologies work together to create an end-to-end platform for sharing, collaboration, analysis, and decision-making, based on the effective management of information to harness its potential while mitigating risk through governance, compliance, and security. EIM delivers a long list of benefits for the enterprise, including reduced costs, increased transparency, improved security and compliance, optimized productivity and efficiency—but the overarching benefit that EIM gives to organizations is the ability to simplify their operations, transform their processes and information, and accelerate business and agility to innovate at the speed of digital.  In a digital world, information will play a fundamental role in empowering the enterprise. Digital leaders will differentiate their products and services based on a strategy that maximizes the potential of digital information. They will use EIM technologies to connect information for better performance, greater opportunity, and deeper insight into their customers. I’ll take a closer look at how competitive advantage is created through managing consumer-related information in the following post in this series, “Digital Engagement and the New Consumer”. Find out how you can capitalize on digital disruption.  To learn more, read my book, Digital: Disrupt or Die.

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Digital-First Fridays: Information is the New Currency

We live in a digital world. A testament to this new reality is the growing value of digital content. People download songs, purchase movies online, exchange emails, and share personal information—all in the form of digital content. Information in its many new forms has become commoditized. In a digital world, information is the new currency. Will it replace the dollar, the Euro, the Yen? Not yet, but as information flows across networks, as it is exchanged and more metadata is collected, it grows in value. New businesses and whole industries are emerging to support the digitization of content. As industry leaders like Google and Facebook have demonstrated, opportunities to monetize information are abundant. Like money, data can be stolen. As information grows in value, so will the need to protect and manage it—and this will be increasingly mandated by governments and regulatory bodies. Many large companies (health care providers, governments, and banks, to name a few) are the gatekeepers of highly confidential, personal information. They are susceptible to information leaks. In a digital world, how will government and regulators monitor and protect the huge amounts of personal data stored in the Cloud? As society becomes digital and the Internet propagates a faster pace of crime, organizations will need to focus on the development and enforcement of governance policies, standards, and systems to prevent identity theft and online fraud. The mass digitalization of products, services, processes, and overall business models will demand a disciplined approach to managing, governing, and innovating with information. Enter Enterprise Information Management, or EIM. EIM is a set of technologies and practices that maximize the value of information as it flows across networks, supply chains, and organizations. Its core technologies work together to create an end-to-end platform for sharing, collaboration, analysis, and decision-making, based on the effective management of information to harness its potential while mitigating risk through governance, compliance, and security. EIM delivers a long list of benefits for the enterprise, including reduced costs, increased transparency, improved security and compliance, optimized productivity and efficiency—but the overarching benefit that EIM gives to organizations is the ability to simplify their operations, transform their processes and information, and accelerate business and agility to innovate at the speed of digital. In a digital world, information will play a fundamental role in empowering the enterprise. Digital leaders will differentiate their products and services based on a strategy that maximizes the potential of digital information. They will use EIM technologies to connect information for better performance, greater opportunity, and deeper insight into their customers. I’ll take a closer look at how competitive advantage is created through managing consumer-related information in the following post in this series, “Digital Engagement and the New Consumer”. Find out how you can capitalize on digital disruption. To learn more, read my book, Digital: Disrupt or Die.

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Digital-First Fridays: What is a Digital Enterprise?

In my first post in this blog series, I examined how the speed of digital is disrupting market leaders, and determined that the only way for them to keep pace and stay competitive is to transform into a digital business. But what exactly is a digital business and how does an organization transform itself? In a digital business, all major operating functions are empowered by digital technology. This means that the business engages customers and conducts business through digital channels, uses digital assets and/or capabilities, and sells digital products or services. As in the case of startups, the value proposition is keenly focusing on serving digital consumers and is enabled by digital technology. This fundamentally impacts an organization’s “value chain.” The value chain of a digital business is more cyclical than it is linear. The value chain is based on a series of interactions and transactions. From the creation of products and services to their consumption, employees, consumers, partners, and processes rely on digital technology for easy access to goods (whether it be products, services, or information), constant connectivity, and immediacy of insight. The entire customer journey is digitized. As a result, the business works in ways that are open, flexible, and support ongoing collaboration and innovation. The Linear Value Chain is Replaced by an Ecosystem In their transformation to a digital business, organizations should reconceptualise themselves as part of an extended enterprise ecosystem, from which they (or their customers or partners) can assemble products and services according to their needs. A digital business digitizes all of its information and processes for efficiency in the back office and deeper levels of engagement in the front (customer-facing) office. As part of a larger ecosystem, a digital business is better equipped to innovate, pivot their operations, customize their products and services, and deliver new products that satisfy consumer need. They can scale their manufacturing capacity and shift geographies as needed. Ultimately, a digital business gains new ways of working to improve productivity, reduce costs, and accelerate business growth. The benefits of transformation into a digital business move beyond those belonging to digital marketing, or creating consistent consumer experiences across digital channels. Digitizing information and processes results in improved efficiencies, higher productivity levels, and lower operational costs. According to McKinsey, companies that digitize their operations can reduce their costs by 9 percent.[1] As digital technologies transform business operations, all major components of the business will be impacted. The components of the 2020 digital business are already emerging and include the Digital Workplace, Digital Engagement, the Digital Supply Chain, and Digital Governance and Security. This blog series will examine each of these facets in detail. Organizations that want to digitize their operations need to focus on the value that digital brings, develop a strategy, and prioritize projects for transformation. They will need to iterate and realize that iteration is part of the process—a more important aspect than perfection. Their entire ecosystem must be digital, so the business must reconfigure its organizational structure, its technology infrastructure, hire the right resources, and focus on the information systems and standards that enable true transformation. As we move rapidly toward a Digital World, one thing is clear: information lies at the heart of innovation and disruption. No longer considered just the cost of doing business, information is instrumental in driving innovation and growth. When used the right way, information leads to greater customer satisfaction, accelerates time-to-market, helps to create new opportunities, and enables businesses to remain relevant and competitive. Information is a key strategic component for every organization today and critical to enabling transformation. In my next blog, I’ll examine how “Information is the New Currency” in a Digital World. Find out how you can capitalize on digital disruption. Read my book, Digital: Disrupt or Die. [1] “The Digital Enterprise,” McKinsey & Company, November 2013.

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Digital-First Fridays: Operating at the Speed of Digital

It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change. – Charles Darwin We live in a time of unprecedented change. In every sector, digital technologies are changing the rules of business by enabling new business models. Startups are reshaping entire industries, combining technologies like cloud, social, mobile, and analytics to deliver more targeted customer products and services. These technologies are empowering organizations to bypass the traditional costs associated with barriers to entry and connect directly with consumers to meet their needs. Startups are disintermediating the market leaders. Over the next five years, executives expect digital disruption to displace four out of ten incumbents—or 40 percent of established market leaders.[1] This is a startling prediction. Part of the reason why this will happen is because startups are able to operate and scale at a very fast pace, innovating very quickly—a pace that larger incumbent organizations (with their legacy systems) can’t match. This is the speed of digital and its potential is uncharted. With more people connecting and sharing ideas in a global, digitized marketplace, the pace of innovation will only increase exponentially. The formula is ten times the innovators at one-tenth of the cost and 100 times the power. Digital Disruption is Stronger and Faster[2] In a Digital World, the development of new products will evolve from sprints to hyper-connected dashes. Product features will be crowdsourced and collective. Feedback about consumer experience will be collected to upgrade features, improve delivery, and serve niche markets—in real time—removing the developer “safety net”. Every single disgruntled consumer will tell 1,000 potential customers about a bad customer experience. Brands will be built up and destroyed on social networks. Product ideas will be shared across yottabytes (one trillion terabytes) of data and millions of people, as innovation cycles are faster, compressed, and even approach the spontaneous. Business Models are Advancing Disruptive technologies are fueling a subscription-based economy. As business moves to the Cloud and mobile access becomes pervasive, the requirements for on-demand services are deposing the mainframe in enterprise infrastructure. Digital innovators are focused on creating exceptional experiences for the digital consumer and benefiting from a lifetime of customer value. As product experiences move to new platforms, companies are measuring their value based on recurring metrics over one-time metrics. In a Digital World, organizations will have to embrace digital disruption or they face the risk of losing market share or becoming obsolete. They will have to disrupt or die. To keep pace, organizations will have to reinvent themselves. They’ll have to digitize their information and operations. They’ll have to innovate at the front end to capture the mindshare of digital consumers and modernize their back offices to integrate their operations more efficiently across the supply chain. And they’ll have to restructure their IT departments to support a digital workforce. They’ll have to operate at the speed of digital. All of our customers have embarked on this journey of digital transformation. Here are a few examples of how they are disrupting their business using the Cloud, analytics, process automation, and mobile computing to simplify their volumes of information, digitize their operations, and accelerate opportunities for success: Mitsubishi Motors is outsourcing its B2B e-commerce capabilities to the Cloud and achieves stronger integration with its suppliers in Europe, without making additional investments in headcount or software. Dell Services is setting new standards of excellence within the IT services industry. Using analytics has helped them drive positive change, increase value, and improve engagement with organizations worldwide. First United Bank is using a BPM solution to help it achieve its goal of going paperless. To date, the Company has digitized over 200 processes and converted over 2.5 million documents and images into digital format for considerable business improvements, including overall growth and customer satisfaction. The City of Barcelona has a comprehensive digital strategy that embraces delivering more targeted and mobile services to its constituents, based on the innovative mobile identification system called “mobileID”. Find out how you can capitalize on digital disruption. In my next post in this series, I’ll explore what it means to function as a digital business. Read my book, Digital: Disrupt or Die. [1] “Executives Expect Digital Disruption to Displace 4 in 10 Incumbents by Industry within Next Five Years,” Webwire, June 24, 2015, http://www.webwire.com/ViewPressRel.asp?aId=198501 (accessed July 2015). [2] James McQuivey, “Digital Disruption: Unleashing the Next Wave of Innovation,” Forrester Research, Inc., 2013.

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Introducing Digital-First Fridays

Today, I’m happy to kick-off our “Digital-First Fridays,” a new blog series that describes a Digital-First World, provides strategies for transformation, and shares best practices using real-life examples. The series is based on our recent book, Digital: Disrupt or Die, authored by myself and OpenText Chairman, Tom Jenkins. In every sector, digital technologies are changing the rules of business. Startups and web-based companies are using digital business models to disintermediate the established market leaders. To remain relevant in a Digital-First World and gain a sustainable competitive advantage, organizations will be required to transform themselves into digital enterprises. Digital transformation requires a radical overhaul of enterprise strategies, processes, products, services, and relationships. Enterprise Information Management (EIM) empowers organizations to make this journey. How? At a basic level, it guides them through each phase of transformation, giving them effective ways to simplify, transform, and accelerate their business. 1. Simplify. Every organization wants to simplify its business. This is a constant challenge. Part of being a digital enterprise involves digitizing your information and automating your processes. In a Digital-First World, you can expect all of your business’ processes to be digitized. Automation will be critical—new research shows that nearly half of all jobs over the next two years could be automated.(1) As business evolves, we’ll rely more and more on machine-based or artificial intelligence, sensors, pattern analysis, and connections between all of these, brought together by the Internet of Things (IoT). Most organizations are already working toward simplifying their operations, indicated on the diagram below as “Present Day Followers.” 2. Transform. Business processes need to be agile to adapt products, services, and operations as customer expectations change—and they are changing. This requires transforming information-based processes and platforms to support digital consumers, a new workforce, a digital supply chain, and emerging technologies. To do this effectively, organizations will need to create an environment in which innovation thrives. Business and technology leaders should be ready to take risks, lead digital strategies, and define new models of engagement. Be ready for a substantial shift in culture to one that’s built on openness, innovation, and trust. Business problems should be examined and new processes created to solve them fearlessly and with imagination. If your organization is here, it’s already adapting to the requirements for future digitization. Building Blocks for Digital Transformation 3. Accelerate. This describes the rate at which we must undertake these changes, which may be daunting to some but, at the same time, it presents greater opportunities to serve customers, partners, and suppliers. Every organization will be required to rethink the way they’re engaging with customers, how they facilitate the workforce, and the ways they’re integrating and managing their information. The final phase of transformation relies on constant innovation. This can only be achieved by increasing the speed of information delivery through integrated systems. Digital Leaders have mastered this. They’re already redesigning customer experiences, overhauling their approaches to information management, rethinking their processes, and re-platforming their operations. Information lies at the heart of digital transformation. Its potential—if realized—is transformative. The challenge lies in managing enterprise information, making it accessible, and then applying it in new ways. EIM is the key transformative technology. Throughout the phases of digital transformation, a digital enterprise adopts EIM as its foundational enterprise platform for change. On “Digital-First Fridays” we’ll explore the future of digital technologies, their impact on the enterprise, and demonstrate how EIM equips the enterprise to brace for change in a Digital-First Future. Posts in the series will include: Operating at the Speed of Digital What is a Digital Enterprise? Information is the New Currency Digital Engagement—A New Business Requirement The Digital Supply Network Be sure to bookmark this page and join in the conversation. (1) David R. Wheeler, “Silicon Valley to millennials: Drop dead,” CNN, March 18, 2015, http://us.cnn.com/2015/03/18/opinions/wheeler-silicon-valley-jobs/?iid=ob_article_organicsidebar_expansion&iref=obnetwork (accessed April 2015).

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Empowering Government with a Digital Agenda

Like private businesses, governments are driven by information. Consider the amount of information associated with a single citizen: a birth certificate, passport, driver’s license, student loans, social security, health-related services, etc. Now multiply that across an entire population. If information is the new currency, then many government organizations are rich—so rich, in fact, that some don’t know what to do with this wealth (of information). The rate at which governments can effectively use their information as an asset is impacted by departmental or application silos. As illustrated below, information that should flow securely and effortlessly across departments, partners, and citizens is often disconnected and processes are fragmented. When this happens, governments don’t have a consolidated view of their information, which means they don’t have an accurate view of their resources, projects, or citizens. The result? Agencies work harder, not smarter. A digital agenda helps government organizations optimize their performance, without compromising governance and security. As part of implementing a digital agenda, digitizing information and processes is a critical first step. It lays the groundwork for collaboration and agility by removing silos that can hamper access and productivity—allowing information to flow freely across departments. Digital transformation requires coordination and collaboration across departments, sectors, jurisdictions, and policy domains; a host of changing relations and communication patterns; and a shift to citizen-centric service delivery. Implementing a digital agenda is critical. Broadly speaking, a digital agenda consists of three phases: Overhauling operations to improve efficiency and profitability. Agencies must reduce costs and increase competitiveness by digitizing their information and processes. Bringing agility into business processes to quickly adapt services and operations. Information processes and platforms need to be relevant for digital citizens, a new workforce, and emerging technologies. Delivering new services to citizens with continuous collaboration and innovation. Efficiency hinges on increasing the speed of information delivery through integrated systems and across projects. Many governments are making great strides in mandating the adoption of a digital strategy. Here are some examples of digital transformation at the federal level in government agencies in the U.S., Canada, and Europe: The U.S. Department of Justice (DoJ), Office of the Federal Detention Trustee (OFDT) has the typical mandate to do more with less. Their average daily population exceeds 55,000 prisoners in federal custody with an annual budget of more than $1 billion. Improving time and cost savings across the organization is paramount. By automating administrative activities like prisoner designation, OFDT has eliminated manual, paper-based processes and the use of outdated file-sharing methods (fax, postal mail and FedEx), at a projected cost-savings of $38.8 million. A Security Enterprise in the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) relies on an e-government process automation solution to improve its performance. The automated, collaborative nature of this solution enables the agency to efficiently manage 4,000 Foreign Military Sales (valued at $49 billion) while effectively fulfilling its mission and characterizing its motto: “Strength in Cooperation”. CIZ (Centrum Indicatiestelling Zorg) oversees the Dutch Ministry of Health, handling over one million cases a year and supporting over 18,000 users. Challenged by a lack of business process control around the handling of cases combined with siloed data (spread across 17 databases), CIZ implemented an integrated case management solution so they can adapt more quickly to changes in legislation. By digitizing key processes, CIZ has been able to meet their target of processing 100 percent of their cases, reducing costs and increasing citizen satisfaction. Transport Canada works with over 50 partners (including Crown corporations, port authorities, and airport authorities) to ensure a safe, secure, efficient, and environmentally responsible transportation system. Fulfillment of their mission is based on timely and informed decision-making. Transport Canada relies on a combined information and records management solution to enable collaboration with all stakeholders, including citizens. Through digitization they have consolidated more than four million records in a single library, bringing together 5,200 users across 117 sites—the largest single library deployment in the Canadian Public Sector. In a Digital-First World, governments will have to support digital business models with new processes. Whether by design or by decree, government organizations will be required to build an e-government infrastructure that digitizes information-based processes. In doing so, they will unlock the potential of information to empower both public servants and citizens, and improve their ability to govern in the process. Agencies around the world are already reaping the benefits of an integrated digital agenda—such as increases in productivity and revenue that amount to cost savings in the millions of dollars; easier access to information through complaint, standardized IT infrastructures; decreases in costs and inefficiencies with automated processes; and improvements in citizen relationships and satisfaction through innovative services. It’s evident that the rewards far outweigh the effort. And the technology is available. You can read all about how governments around the world are implementing digital agendas in my book e-Government or Out of Government. 1. Paul Tellier and David Emerson, “Seventh Report of the Prime Minister’s Advisory Committee on the Public Service,” Clerk of the Privy Council, March, 2013: http://www.clerk.gc.ca/eng/feature.asp?pageId=314 (accessed December 2013).

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OpenText Partners to Establish the Open Data Exchange (ODX)

This week, OpenText was honored to host the announcement of the Harper Government’s support for the Open Data Exchange (ODX) at our Waterloo office. Minister Tony Clement, President of the Treasury Board of Canada and long-time proponent of open government and open data movements in Canada, officially introduced the initiative by announcing up to $3 million in funding for Communitech Corporation to establish the Open Data Exchange (ODX) here in Waterloo. Both open government and open data movements are stimulating innovation and fostering economic growth around the world. Open data is information that is accessible, available in digital machine-readable format, and reusable under open license terms. Over the past decade, governments have launched initiatives to promote the reuse open data, developing open license models, establishing regulatory frameworks, and making data publicly available on government websites. The ODX is a component of “Government of Canada’s Action Plan on Open Government 2.0” and a demonstration of the Government’s continued commitment to establishing Canada as a leader in digital innovation. OTX brings together key players focused on unlocking the potential of open data for the economy. Its foundation is based on a partnership between the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (FedDev Ontario) and the University of Waterloo, Communitech, the Canadian Digital Media Network (CDMN) and tech leaders OpenText and the Desire to Learn (D2L). Representatives from each organization joined Tony Clement to share their thoughts on the importance of the ODX. From left to right, speakers included Jeremy Auger, Chief Strategy Officer, D2L; Kevin Tuer, Managing Director of the ODX and Vice-President, Digital Media for Communitech; Tom Jenkins, Chairman of OpenText Corporation; the Honourable Tony Clement, Peter Braid, Member of Parliament for Kitchener-Waterloo; and Dr. George Dixon, Vice-President of Research, University of Waterloo. Data is a part of our DNA here at OpenText. We manage a third of the world’s data behind the firewall. It’s only fitting that we provide a temporary home for the ODX, which will reside at our Waterloo Headquarters in the David Johnston Research & Technology Park in Waterloo, Ontario, until plans are finalized for a permanent home in uptown Waterloo. Data is the raw material for new products and services. Open data promises unlimited potential in its combinations of datasets of information. The ODX is the engine that will help drive to Ontario’s growth and prosperity. Tech innovation is the oil that will power this engine in its race for the digital future. Please join me in welcoming the ODX to OpenText. Read the press release.

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OpenText and SAP Run Together for Exceptional Customer Impact

As we gear up for another year at SAPPHIRE, I’d like to reflect on the strong relationship that OpenText and SAP have shared for decades and look ahead to an exciting future together. For more than 20 years, we have worked together to empower the enterprise to manage its unstructured and structured information for business success. Our combined solutions make information more discoverable, manageable, secure, and valuable. Connecting SAP business suites with OpenText information suites delivers a powerful platform for innovation and opportunity. Together, we have: Transformed processing operations at Bumblebee Foods from being 100 percent reliant on paper to being 100 percent digital, with automated processes reducing costs by over 50 percent and significantly increasing efficiency. Positioned Alagasco for future growth through increased sustainability and performance. Centralized information has helped break down organizational silos, speed up sales processes, and maintain business continuity. Created a culture of innovation at Distell by empowering employees to share best practices and collaborate. As well as increasing productivity, the organization has managed its intellectual capital more effectively to enhance and protect its brand. As the world around us shifts to digital, the combined value that we deliver as partners grows exponentially. In celebration of this valued relationship, OpenText has been awarded the SAP Pinnacle Award for seven years in a row. Today, I’m pleased to announce that we have just received the 2015 SAP Pinnacle Award for “Solution Extension Partner of the Year”, making OpenText a recipient for the past eight years. This category honors partners who co-innovate with SAP to deliver exceptional customer impact. OpenText was selected for this year’s award based on our innovative approach that enriches and extends the capabilities and scope of SAP products and applications OpenText was formally presented with the 2015 SAP Pinnacle Award at the SAP Global Partner Summit last evening, in conjunction with SAPPHIRE® NOW, SAP’s international customer conference in Orlando, Florida. We’re on hand at this event to showcase the latest advancements in joint OpenText and SAP releases. Look for us at booth #130 at the conference where we’ll be demonstrating the power and flexibility of products like SAP Document Presentation, SAP Invoice Management, and Tempo Box Premium. We continue to build out the OpenText and SAP ecosystem. Our strategic solutions now support a broad range of SAP offerings—from HANA database and analytics to Simple Finance and the HANA Enterprise Cloud. Recent releases include HANA integrations for SAP Document Presentment by OpenText and SAP Invoice Management by OpenText—both designed to deliver deeper insight and content value, enhancing an organization’s process efficiency and the ability to make more strategic decisions. These extensions are available in the cloud, on premise, or as a hybrid solution. At Enterprise World 2014, our annual user conference, we introduced the OpenText Business Center for SAP Solutions, a platform for automating mission-critical business processes across the SAP business suite. We have now announced the general availability of this product. Using the OpenText Business Center for SAP, joint customers will be able to digitize entire processes in SAP—from capture to creation—without requiring complex configuration or programming resources. In the Digital-First World, all of an organization’s information and processes will be digital. This release is part of our commitment to simplify, transform, and accelerate business for the digital enterprise—enabling it to drive efficiency through digitization. In addition to expanding our support for SAP processes, we will be also be introducing Tempo Box Value Edition & Tempo Box Premium. Tempo Box Value Edition & Tempo Box Premium are secure solutions for sharing and synchronizing both personal and SAP enterprise content across different platforms and devices. Both deliver tight integration into SAP Extended ECM, giving users greater freedom to share and work with business content across any device, while still maintaining information governance and control. Tempo Box Value Edition & Tempo Box Premium enhance the SAP ecosystem by securely extending content tied to SAP business processes beyond the firewall to non-SAP users, including unlimited external users such as customers, suppliers, and partners across the business network. The ability to manage unstructured information in the enterprise plays a pivotal role in digital transformation—and it is a key capability that the OpenText and SAP ecosystem delivers. Our partnership continues to drive product breakthroughs that produce impactful and tangible results for our customers. Together, we are laying the foundation for a Digital-First World for over 4,500 customers and 50+ million active users—across two decades of innovation and into the future. Read the press release. Visit our website.

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OpenText Featured on Bloomberg Business

For this year’s global Innovation Tour, we’ve taken our Digital-First World message on the road. Already underway, members of our executive leadership team have presented in major cities in Asia Pacific, including Mumbai, Tokyo, Sydney, and Singapore. As one of many highlights of the tour, OpenText CMO Adam Howatson was featured on Bloomberg Asia’s Brandstanding in Singapore. The interview covers a number of topics, ranging from the value of information in creating new services and opening up new revenue opportunities to why the cloud is it important for brands and businesses, and how OpenText is successfully rewriting the rules of business for successful digital transformation. According to Howatson, “Being able to connect the way [the business is] represented on social platforms and the way that brands are represented and shared on the Internet and through our connected society, through to back office operations, to manufacturing and internal business processes… It truly is the organizations who are able to integrate that experience and that flow of information who will outperform their competitors in every industry.” Bloomberg Business delivers business and markets news, data, analysis, and video nationwide featuring stories from Businessweek and Bloomberg News. As a global business network, Bloomberg has over 22 million visitors to its web video assets. Watch the video. Learn more about the Digital-First World by downloading the book: Digital: Disrupt or Die.

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Infusing the Supply Chain with Analytics

The strategic use of supply chain information is a key driver of competitive advantage in the Digital-First World. Once a company’s B2B processes are automated and transactions are flowing, visibility into those transactions can fuel better strategic and tactical decision-making across the entire business network. Insights from analytics allow trading partners to speed their decision-making, rapidly respond to changing customer and market demands, and optimize their business processes. Our mission at OpenText is to enable our customers to prepare for and thrive in the digital future. Analytic capabilities will play a key role. As I’ve said in previous posts, analytic technologies represent the next frontier in extracting value from enterprise information. For this reason, we are infusing new analytic capabilities into all our core solutions. We recently added new analytic capabilities to the OpenText Trading Grid to help our customers easily access insights for improving their supply chains’ effectiveness. The OpenText Trading Grid is powered by the OpenText Cloud and is the world’s leading B2B integration network, processing more than 16 billion transactions per year, integrating 600,000 trading partners for more than 60,000 customers around the globe. The solution boasts easy-to-use dashboards which depict and summarize data trends and compare them to key performance indicators (KPIs) for the business. They allow companies to evaluate the performance of suppliers or the behavior of customers and use this information to improve processes and relationships. On a more granular level, ‘track and trace’ data highlights exception information about a specific order, shipment, or invoice. By taking prompt corrective action, companies can remedy a situation before process performance degrades or costs accumulate. There are many, many scenarios in which analytic insights bring incredible benefit to the supply chain. Armed with information about the physical location of products or shipments, companies are able to plan operations with greater efficiency, reduce the number of items lost in transit, and fulfill orders with greater accuracy. They can replenish products as shortages are detected. When it comes to process automation, information about the performance of equipment is used to track degradation, order replacement parts, and schedule service before failure occurs. Today, the digital supply chain is an information supply chain that coordinates the flow of goods, communications, and commerce internally and externally across an extended ecosystem of business partners. It seamlessly integrates data from supply chain processes and smart equipment, and tracks intelligent products, parts, and shipments tagged with sensors. Within a few short years it will expand to integrate data from the Internet of Things (IoT). Data will flow online from myriad devices, including wearable technologies, 3-D printers, and logistics drones. It is expected that we will see a thirty-fold increase in web-enabled physical devices by the year 2020. All of these devices producing volumes of data will create a network rich with information and insights. This is the future. A future in which analytics bring incredible value and competitive advantage to the supply chain. And we are only just beginning to envision it. To learn more about OpenText Trading Grid Analytics, read our press release or visit our website.

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International Women’s Day: A Bold Call to Action

This March 8th, on behalf of my colleagues here at OpenText, I invite you to celebrate International Women’s Day and the economic, political, and social achievements of women. Through diversity programs that promote women in technology we can make a profound and lasting change for the betterment of the equality and posterity of women, the technology industry, and society as a whole. The first International Women’s Day dates back to 1911. The 21st century has brought significant changes to equal representation and emancipation for women. There is greater equality in legislation, workplace standards, and social situations. There are more women in management positions and more woman in the boardroom. And there is a greater visibility around women as invaluable role models in society. Despite these changes—from the classroom to the boardroom—men still outnumber women in fields like science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. In the technology industry alone, there is a great disparity in representation by women when compared to men. In Canada, according to a report released by the Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Council, ICT is still 75% male. In comparison to leading companies in technology, OpenText ranks higher in its representation of women, but we can do more to reduce gender disparity. International Women’s Day is about celebrating the wins. We have an opportunity here and it is one we should not miss. I believe that women play a vital role in building the technology that the world needs. To quote Weili Dai, president and co-founder Marvell Technology Group (and the only woman co-founder of a major semi-conductor company): “Technology is one of the key drivers of female economic empowerment.” At OpenText, diversity makes us strong. People inspire every effort we undertake at OpenText. A people-first approach is core to our value system and our culture. As we create the best possible solutions for our customers, we are committed to creating an environment of empowerment. One that enables our diverse workforce to excel at what they do, gives them the freedom they need to innovate, and drives the passion to make contributions that are worthwhile. OpenText is continuously identifying and promoting opportunities for improving the quality of a work environment that supports diversity. The wide-ranging backgrounds, experiences, and perspectives of our employees provide a powerful competitive advantage and are crucial to our continued business success. We are dedicated to creating an environment that respects differences in culture, ethnicity, and gender. To demonstrate our commitment to becoming the employer of choice for women, we have named “Women in Technology” as the top initiative of our Global Diversity program. We have joined with the Catalyst organization to expand on opportunities for women at OpenText through shared research, events, workshops, webinars, and other services and networking opportunities. We will also participate in internationally-focused women in technology events like the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing. And finally, we are working to establish baseline metrics to measure our progress each quarter. Our first step is this call to action: Please join me in striving to empower women and alter the gender imbalance in technology. Today we celebrate women everywhere for pushing the boundaries and challenging the status quo. We also celebrate the incredible women at OpenText who inspire us and drive our business forward each and every day. Please take a moment to watch the video.

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Innovation Tour 2015 Kicks Off

Conversations about digital transformation are timely and important. Every organization in every industry needs to be having them right now. At Enterprise World in November, we started a dialogue with our customers about the transformative power of Enterprise Information Management (EIM). Starting this week, we’ll be continuing this conversation and taking it on the road in our Innovation Tour 2015. The tour covers 15 cities with stops in Asia Pacific, Latin America, Europe, and North America. I’m excited to visit our partners and customers in their own geographies to share our vision, agenda, and portfolio of enhancements that will prepare the enterprise to simplify, transform, and accelerate its operations in 2020. Some of the exciting innovations I plan to share on the tour include the very topical cloud and analytics. Since the cloud offers huge benefits to customers, we’ve enhanced our cloud offerings with the addition of subscription pricing and we’ve launched OpenText CORE—an on-demand SaaS solution for cloud-based document sharing and collaboration. We’ve also invested in a predictive analytics platform for all our EIM solutions, so customers can infuse analytics across their information flows and their business networks for greater accuracy, transparency, and business insight. Analytics is a powerful addition to our portfolio and the next frontier in deriving value from your enterprise information. Innovation Tour 2015 is an opportunity like no other to access valuable, forward-looking, and highly relevant information about strategies, tactics, and technologies for digital transformation. It’s a chance to learn about key trends, best practices, and to have relevant and thought-provoking conversations with experts, peers, and colleagues. I’m confident you will leave better equipped to guide your organization confidently into the Digital-First World. The Innovation Tour 2015 is coming soon to a city near you. I’ll be checking in from different locations, so be sure to follow my blog for updates on the road. You can also learn more about the Digital-First World by downloading my recent book: Digital: Disrupt or Die.

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Mobility is Critical for E-Government

Mobile devices are transforming the way citizens interact with their governments—from using digital IDs for access to program information to crowdsourcing apps to improve city services. As mobile usage rises, citizens are demanding more exclusively mobile experiences from their governments—ones that move beyond basic apps and optimizing web pages for devices. To better serve their mobile stakeholders, governments will be required to adopt a mobile-centric approach as part of an overall digital, e-government strategy. The case for a mobile approach is driven by consumer expectation, opportunities to improve service delivery, increased transparency through easy access to information, and new products and services that are co-created with citizens. Mobility makes government more accessible, affordable, collaborative, and convenient. As part of an e-government strategy, mobile programs give governments the opportunity to increase the efficiency of their services externally and to improve productivity internally. Rather than treating the mobile device as an additional channel or touchpoint, the focus should shift to a mobile-only approach that complements a streamlined, omni-channel experience for users. While forward-looking governments are making it possible for citizens to complete transactions using their mobile device, the public sector lags behind the private sector when it comes to embracing mobility to maximize user experience. According to research, the number of consumer mobile transactions is due to rise 65% between now and 2016. Mobile bank cards will replace physical bank cards. QR codes and Near Field Communications (a wireless communications technology that enables mobile devices to communicate based on proximity) allow for payments using a SIM card. These technologies are already expanding to support other uses with great potential for government applications for identification, transportation, and ticketing. Just as mobile devices empower citizens with flexible access to programs and services, they also enable civil servants to do their jobs more effectively. Mobility enhances productivity by providing secure, remote access to government systems on a self-service basis. Using mobile devices, employees can stay productive on the go, wherever they are. Mobile-centric programs help front line workers do more with less. Ideally suited for caseworkers, first responders, and law enforcement officers, mobility increases responsiveness by providing immediate access to accurate information and resources. Expedited decision making improves efficiency, decreases response times and, in some cases, saves lives. Manual labor around paperwork and data entry is minimized—saving time and money. In a recent report issued by ICF International, 93% of U.S. federal government employees identified digital technology as being a critical factor in improving their productivity, with three-quarters of them relying on a mobile device and half using their own personal devices for business purposes. The report finds that federal workers require new and available technologies to enhance engagement and satisfy the demands of an increasingly mobile workforce. Both internally and externally, users want an intuitive and consistent mobile experience that delivers value as part of the overall e-government experience. The public sector needs to adopt a mobile-centric mentality. One of our customers—and a true digital innovator—Sergi Jerez the Director of Mobile, eGovernment y Data, for the City of Barcelona, eloquently summarizes this approach: City of Barcelona e-government quote But where should agencies start when creating a mobile engagement strategy? Here are a few high-level recommendations: Dedicate resources from both the business and IT to developing a mobile strategy. Design your solution(s) to meet user or citizen needs. Address their key pain points. For example, focus on the need for more efficient updates from case workers in the field. Provide access to accurate information about end users and mobile consumers. Strive for alignment across departments and agencies and a holistic view of citizen data, for example. Enterprise Information Management (EIM) helps to consolidate structured and unstructured information for a single source of the truth. Map citizen or user journeys. Apply embedded analytics to cultivate insight into behavior and identify usage patterns and trends. What devices do users prefer? What channels do they use? Draw up detailed personas and scenarios for use. Establish your mobile-centric engagement strategy and identify key objectives. Make sure this strategy is integrated effectively with your overall e-government strategy to streamline experience and efficiency. Develop the mobile experience using technology as an enabler (focus on the experience, not the technology). Measure outcomes against desired results and identified objectives. Refine your delivery of the experience. Mobile technology promises more efficient access to information, resources, and services. The number of access points to information that mobile introduces, however, also serves to complicate programs and policymaking. Mobile information in all its formats needs to be securely managed. To find out more about mobile access to information systems, mobile security, and leaders in mobile innovation, read my book: e-Government or Out of Government. Contact us to discuss any of our targeted government solutions.  

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OpenText Enhances Portfolio with Analytic Capabilities

    By Mark Barrenechea, President and Chief Executive Officer, OpenText Analytics are a hot technology today, and it is easy to see why. They have the power to transform facts into strategic insights that deliver intelligence “in the moment” for profound impact. Think “Moneyball” and the Oakland A’s in 2002, when Billy Bean hired a number-crunching statistician to examine their odds and changed the game of baseball forever. Across the board—from sports analysis to recommending friends to finding the best place to eat steak in town, analytics are replacing intelligence reports with algorithms that can predict behavior and make decisions. It can create that 1 percent advantage that creates the 100 percent difference between winning and losing. Analytics represent the next frontier in deriving value from information, which is why I’m pleased to announce that OpenText has recently acquired Actuate to enhance its portfolio of products. With powerful predictive analytics technology, Actuate complements our existing information management and B2B integration offerings by allowing organizations to analyze and visualize a broad range of structured, semi-structured, and unstructured data. In a recent study, 96 percent of organizations surveyed felt that analytics will become increasingly important to their organizations in the next three years. From a business perspective, analytics offer customers increased business process efficiencies, greater brand experience, and additional personalized insight for better and faster decisions. In a Digital-First World, organizations will tap into sophisticated analytics techniques to identify their best customers, accelerate product innovation, optimize supply chains, and identify the drivers of financial performance. Agile enterprises incorporate consumer and market data into decision making. People are empowered when they have easy access to agile, flexible, and responsive analytical tools and applications. Actuate enables developers to easily create business applications that leverage information about users, processes, and transactions generated by the various OpenText EIM suites. Customers will be able to view analytics for the entire EIM suite based on a common platform to reduce their total cost of ownership and get a comprehensive view for more elevated, strategic business insight. Actuate is the founder of the popular open source integrated development environment (IDE), BIRT, and develops the world-class deployment platform, BIRT iHub™. BIRT iHub™ significantly improves the productivity of developers working on customer-facing applications. More than 3.5 million BIRT developers and OEMs use Actuate to build scalable, secure solutions that deliver personalized analytics and insights to more than 200 million customers, partners and employees. Designed to be embeddable, developers can use the platform to enrich nearly any application. And, these analytics-enriched applications can be delivered on premises, in the cloud, or in any hybrid scenario. We are excited to welcome the Actuate team into the OpenText family as we continue to help drive innovation and offer the most complete EIM solution in the market. Read the press release on the acquisition here.

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Welcome Informative Graphics Corporation!

Today is a very exciting day for our customers as we announce the acquisition of Informative Graphics Corporation (IGC). Having more than 250 joint customers and more than 300,000 seats of Brava!® for OpenText Content Server, we are thrilled to be able to deepen our relationship with this long-time partner. The need for advanced document viewing and collaboration capabilities exists in almost every industry. It has become a critical capability in the way that we interact with electronic content. Fast, fluid and secure access to content on any device on any browser has become essential to the mobile experience for today’s workers. At the other end of the spectrum are complex 2-D and 3-D design documents that need to be viewed in the browser in order to annotate and collaborate on documents. IGC gives OpenText a significant advantage in addressing this need with best-in-class solutions for viewing, annotation, redaction and publishing that cover the complete spectrum of use cases. With a full suite of powerful, proven software that helps organizations securely view, share, redact and transform documents, images including CAD drawings, IGC offers more efficient collaboration, better control and increased productivity. IGC and its technologies allow us to strengthen OpenText’s offerings for secure access to any content, on any device, on premises and in the cloud. Having already seen success in offering these integrated solutions to the marketplace, we have the opportunity to further integrate IGC technologies into the ECM product portfolio. We will now be able to extend into other OpenText Suites, reaching more customers using additional OpenText solutions globally. At OpenText, we are committed to leading innovation and creating the most complete EIM solution for the industry’s continuously evolving needs. As we make the shift to the digital workplace, document viewing and mark-up on any device will enable our customers to leverage their information and drive growth and success in their organization. We look forward to working closer with the IGC team and growing our relationship with its new ECM, Engineering Solutions and eDiscovery partners and their customers. As we continue to work together to support our customers and shape the EIM market, we expect nothing less than remarkable innovations and contributions from the IGC team. Please join me in welcoming IGC employees, partners, and customers to OpenText. Read the press release on the acquisition here.

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Mark’s Predictions: Top Tech Trends for 2015

2014 marked an incredible year. We watched technology cross the threshold from futuristic concept to mainstream use with biometric devices like Apple’s Touch ID featured on the iPhone and iPad, and 3-D printers like MakerBot’s Thing-O-Matic installed in local schools and libraries for the kids to use. The release of Gigabit-per-second broadband service Google Fiber pushed broadband to new limits and free Wi-Fi became a mainstay in public places like Tim Hortons, McDonald’s, and Starbucks. While some companies soared—Internet service Airbnb kick-started the sharing economy, WhatsApp was acquired by Facebook for a whopping $16 billion, and Alibaba celebrated the largest tech IPO ever, raking in $21.8 billion, others fell by the wayside. Amidst all the market upheavals, change was the only constant. “When you’re finished changing, you’re finished.” – Benjamin Franklin What’s in store for 2015? As the Digital-First World takes hold, the disruptors will be disrupted and technology will continue to change our lives in big ways. Here are the top technology trends I see impacting the way we work and play in 2015. 1. Cloud becomes the new normal The cloud will be embraced en masse in 2015 because the benefits are huge. By digitizing information-intensive processes, costs can be cut by up to 90% and turnaround times improved by several orders of magnitude. What I expect to see by year end is a world of hybrid deployments in which some information and applications reside in the cloud and the remainder resides on premise. Data security is a top priority, and a hybrid model allows organizations to balance their workload, meeting all their data sovereignty requirements while leveraging the power of the cloud. 2. Digitization begins the next massive displacement and migration of labour The employment landscape will be in flux throughout 2015, the early stages of what I expect to be the next significant labor displacement. Digital technologies like the Internet of Things (IoT), wearable technologies, and mobile and smart devices will force organizations to change the way they engage customers, and develop and deliver new products and services. Analytics will become ubiquitous, bringing intelligence to every process. Robotics, smart machines, and artificial intelligence (AI) will infiltrate new parts of the organization and automate positions that are repetitive and transactional in nature. In time, we could see 20 to 30 million jobs migrate or disappear. It’s not all doom and gloom, but simply a shift from transactional jobs to tacit jobs. Tacit jobs require data analysis, judgement, and problem solving skills, as well as the ability to think creatively, communicate effectively, and collaborate in teams. Tacit jobs are predicted to grow two-and-a-half times faster than the transactional segment and CEOs will soon recognize the skills gap around tacit jobs for technology. 3. New startups will mesh digital and physical 2015 will be the year in which nimble startups will outpace established enterprises to bring new products to market faster than ever. Technological advances like 5G networks, more processing power, advances in storage, and cloud and mobile computing are blurring the boundaries between the physical and the virtual—between people and their technology. Startups will follow in the footsteps of Tado and Dash to leverage this “zero-distance connectivity” and offer compelling new products and services. Startups are purists in their approach, organizing their operations around a focused sense of purpose and the promise of tremendous growth. Agility trumps size, which makes startup culture dynamic, unstable, easy to scale, and eager to embrace (even define) new business models. The startup philosophy entails a rapid product development cycle. Over the next few years, we’ll see development cycles evolve from sprints to hyper-connected dashes. Innovation will become faster, more compressed, and approach the spontaneous. To keep pace in a Digital-First World, CIOs and business leaders will have to think like entrepreneurs and adopt startup strategies. Borrowing from the startup ethos will empower them to build adaptive enterprises that can proactively create opportunities for growth. 4. The world realizes the “Internet of things” is just the Internet Everyone is buzzing about the Internet of Things (IoT). The IoT is the extension of the Internet, connecting us to millions of machines, sensors, and objects around us. The IoT will transform the world as we know it, creating a giant, global network of devices and machines that are connected, communicating, and exchanging data. This market will see 50 billion devices connected by 2020 and a value of $14.4 trillion. Its potential impact is huge. While the IoT is viewed by many as a nebulous, futuristic concept, in reality, it already exists: we wear pedometers, smart watches, and cameras; our pets are microchipped; and we drive cars with built-in sensors. Thanks to the IoT, many of our everyday appliances will soon have the ability to self-monitor and communicate with a network—think Marge’s fully automated “Ultrahouse 3000” in the Simpsons. Organizations in both the public and private sector are already using sensor-based technologies to improve inventory control and manage energy through smart grids. As we progress through 2015, more and more people will come to realize the IoT is simply the next evolution of the Internet. 5. The Chief Data Officer and Chief Digital Officer will become mainstream To help guide the enterprise on its journey to digital transformation, two C-level roles will find themselves at the executive table: the Chief Data Officer and the Chief Digital Officer. While their roles are unique, both will focus on the strategic importance of information in a digital economy. The Chief Digital Officer will be the executive advocate for the digital customer and will emerge to oversee both the strategy and the technology for a seamless and satisfying digital customer experience. According to Gartner, 25% of businesses will have a Chief Digital Officer by the end of 2015. The Chief Data Officer will emerge as the executive advocate for data management—using the exploding volumes of data and analytics to improve decision making and identify new revenue opportunities. Across the organization, every function will want access to data and insights about their operations. The Chief Data Officer will make this possible by optimizing the management of data (integrating, deploying, securing, governing) and mobilizing their organization around an Enterprise Information Management (EIM) strategy. The Digital-First World is coming like a fast-moving train. It’s fueled by disruptors like cloud technology, the IoT, and a shifting workforce. The impact of its changes are just around the corner. Are you ready? Read my new book Digital: Disrupt or Die to find out. I wish you all a Happy New Year and great success in 2015.

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Cyber Security in Government

Cyber-attacks are on the rise. Data breaches are becoming more common and devastating. Akamai’s State of the Internet Report revealed that hacker attacks on websites rose by 75% in the final quarter of 2013. As digital technologies evolve, information security breaches are becoming more sophisticated, multi-stage, and highly targeted. From organized crime syndicates to hacktivists, vulnerabilities permeate all levels of IT systems—at great cost. Estimated financial impact of cybercrime to the global economy ranges from $375 billion to $575 billion annually. And this figure doesn’t even reflect estimated losses of trade secrets, intellectual property, and other non-financial impacts, which peaks at $2.2 trillion annually (PwC). To mitigate this corporate threat, world-wide investment in information security is expected to reach $76.9 billion by 2015. Enterprises and government agencies are under virtually constant attack. As gatekeepers of highly sensitive data and confidential assets, cyber security is a top priority for government agencies. In a recent study, half of cyber security professionals in the U.S. Federal Government agree that their agency is likely to be the victim of a denial-of-service attack in the next 12 months. What is especially concerning is that, while they foresee future breaches, the majority of participants in this study feel unprepared: 74% say they are not prepared for an international cyber-attack; 74% are not prepared to support secure access for mobile devices; 70% are unprepared for a denial-of-service attack; and 70% are not prepared to secure cloud computing environments. These are disconcerting numbers. The same study revealed one of the major catalysts of security breaches—the end user (in other words, your employees). While many security risks come from outside an organization, many breaches occur from within. The rise of the mobile workforce contributes to this, increasing risk through the lack of clearly defined or implemented Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD) policies, lost or stolen devices, and the accidental sharing of confidential information across devices. To their disadvantage, agencies fail to take the end-user experience into account when deploying cyber security solutions. As a result, users often circumvent security measures, making their agencies vulnerable to data theft, data loss, and denial-of-service attacks. While federal agencies are looking for mechanisms to fight information security threats, they are shifting to a distributed approach that combines top-down governance and bottom-up security mechanisms, fully integrated in an Enterprise Information Management (EIM) system. Taking the end user into account, EIM is designed to protect information where it is used: at the point of interaction (with the end user) in the application itself. Mechanisms like access and permission rights, information audit, and secure information exchange are built right into the system to secure content. Technologies such as records management and auto-classification provide a non-intrusive solution that eliminates the need for business users to sort and classify content, while enabling agencies to establish highly defensible, completely transparent records management as part of a broader information governance strategy. Automating the ability to identify records and apply classifications eliminates the burden on the end-user, increases productivity, and helps to ensure content is securely managed and disposed of, throughout its lifecycle, in any format. Government agencies are challenged to protect personal data and comply with privacy and other regulations, while permitting open access to government information. From the top-down, EIM offers a risk-based approach to information security and ensures the capabilities, programs, and processes are in place to assist governments in maintaining the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of their information. EIM helps agencies find a fine balance by empowering both the organization and end users with the confidence that their information is secure. With security threats looming on the horizon, the value of information cannot be considered outside of the context of security. EIM is a key component in a comprehensive information security arsenal—alongside established policies and procedures, employee training and awareness, and continual monitoring of security risk and the program as a whole. You can read more about information security in the public sector in my book: e-Government or Out of Government. Contact us to discuss any of our targeted government solutions.

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New Cloud Offerings at Enterprise World

Enterprise World 2014 is now officially closed and was one for the history books. We had 1, 950 attendees, 464 partners, 181 sessions, and 16 countries were represented over 6 days for one killer experience. Martin Short rocked the house. Our focus this year was on the Digital-First World that is fast approaching. We highlighted the need to simplify, transform, and accelerate every process for unstructured information both within the enterprise and throughout the business network. We also talked about the centrality of the cloud in a Digital-First World. The cloud will be fundamental for communications, information exchange, and commerce transactions between business partners. Organizations will need applications to effectively manage their enterprise information traversing the cloud—applications for managing it securely, across any device and provided through a modern, simplified user experience. At Enterprise World, we unveiled innovations that will help enterprises transform for the digital future. We announced a service pack that brings new analytics, systems management, usability, and other enhancements to each of our Enterprise Information Management (EIM) suites. We announced a new hosting service and new subscription pricing models. While these capabilities are important enablers of a Digital-First World, customer attention clearly gravitated to OpenText Core—our new EIM SaaS offering. OpenText Core is EIM built for the cloud, built for the enterprise. It delivers lightweight, on-demand, enterprise-grade information management in the cloud. It’s the perfect addition to our portfolio and gives our customers more choice and more flexibility for cloud-based information management. As was evident from our announcements last week, we’re going to go faster and more aggressively into the cloud both through our technologies and our business models. We are moving into a subscription economy. New business models will continue to emerge and evolve. Hybrid deployments will be commonplace in the Digital-First World and will enable customers to balance their workload, meeting all their data sovereignty requirements while leveraging the power of the cloud. We will provide a spectrum of deployment options. I always find it invigorating to engage customers and partners at Enterprise World to discover how our solutions power their business, and to unveil innovative new products that position them for success and leadership in their industry. Their reactions, feedback, and insights are priceless. This year was no exception. Digital is here. It is real. Customers are actively embracing it. We will help them get there. While Enterprise World has ended, our journey of digital transformation has only begun. I look forward to continued dialog with you—valued customers, partners, and members of the enterprise community, in the days and weeks ahead. I’d be interested to hear about your story of digital transformation—feel free to share in the comments below. I also encourage you to read about digital transformation in my new book Digital: Disrupt or Die. It is an informative discourse about the Digital-First World and offers a blueprint for reinventing your business, gaining competitive advantage, and embracing all this exciting new era has to offer.

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Digital: Disrupt or Die

I’m pleased to announce the release of my latest book Digital: Disrupt or Die. It’s an exciting discourse about the emerging Digital-First World and technologies that are disrupting our society, our industries, and our markets—driving a transformation that will be well underway by the year 2020. Most importantly, it offers a blueprint for how companies can successfully reinvent themselves to better serve their customer, gain competitive advantage, and lead in their industry. With the changes that are coming, the choice is clear. Winners will embrace digital technologies, capitalize on opportunity, and reinvent themselves as digital enterprises. Losers will fall to the wayside and become obsolete. As outlined in my new book, here are the top 10 things you need to know about 2020: 1. Disruption is coming, and it’s coming fast. In a recent survey, 93 percent of global business executives believe digital will disrupt their business in the next 12 months. And they expect the change to be radical and complete—reaching all parts of the organization. 2. The world has gone mobile—hyper connectivity is here to stay. Today, 91 percent of people on the planet (or roughly 6 billion) have a mobile phone and, for 50 percent of them, mobile is their primary connection to the Internet. By 2020, the number will increase to 8 billion. Soon more people will access the Internet on mobile devices than on personal computers; eight out of ten digital shoppers will be mobile shoppers. 3. Business is moving decidedly to the cloud. By 2017, 50 percent of large enterprises will adopt a hybrid cloud computing model with data stored partially on cloud servers and partially on site. 4. The Internet of Things (IoT) will extend connectivity to everyone, everything, everywhere. By 2020, the number of connected devices will range from 25 billion (three times the world’s population) to as many as 1 trillion devices (120 times the population). 5. Mobile, social, cloud, the IoT, and data analytic technologies are converging to create a new platform for communication and information exchange. This new platform will increase the volume of information and introduce new formats to the enterprise. 6. In a Digital-First World, information will be the new currency. The value of information will move beyond optimizing performance to creating new products and services, and opening up new sales channels. Consumer data will be the biggest differentiator in the next two to three years. Whoever unlocks the reams of data and uses it strategically will win. 7. As digital technologies evolve, so will the information security threat. Security breaches will continue to increase. The number of cyber-attacks on organizations is already impacting spending on information security. Worldwide investment is expected to reach $76.9 billion in 2015. 8. Good governance is good business. In a recent study, 95 percent of organizations correlate strong information management with business success. It is estimated that by 2016, 20 percent of CIOs in regulated industries will lose their jobs for failing to implement the discipline of information governance successfully. 9. Smart businesses will cater to Generation Z. By 2020, they will comprise 50 percent of your workforce. They will expect to work in ways that are open, social, mobile, and flexible. They will want to use the same tools in the workplace that they use at home to communicate, collaborate, and share information. Since they are key implementers of your digital strategy, you need to recruit them and build a digital enterprise to empower them. 10. The future belongs to digital innovators. On average, digital leaders are 26 percent more profitable than their industry competitors. They generate 9 percent more revenue through their employees and physical assets. Organizations that disrupt their business and leverage digital technology will gain a competitive edge. Are you ready for 2020? Read my new book Digital: Disrupt or Die and discover how EIM can help you simply, transform and accelerate.

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