Analytics

Data Driven Digest for January 23

Each Friday we share some favorite reporting on, and examples of, data driven visualizations and embedded analytics that came onto our radar in the past week. Use the “Subscribe” link at left and we’ll email you with new entries.   State the Obvious: It’s not just your kids who can’t put down their phones. Members of Congress were busily tweeting during Tuesday night’s State of the Union address. And although the two parties can’t agree on much, they were pretty well synchronized – united, you might say – on when to tweet. In the bar chart above, The New York Times visualized the number of tweets by Democrats and Republicans in five-minute increments throughout the speech. The accompanying article gives details on the process and more analysis of the results. Law of the Land: You’ve probably heard of Moore’s Law, which states that the number of transistors in an integrated circuit doubles approximately every two years.  Rather than take Moore’s Law as an obvious truth, Plotly published a clever blog with an interactive graph (click through the static version above) that proves it. The same blog post also visualizes Zipf’s Law (dealing with word use), Benford’s Law (which explores number frequency) and Hubble’s Law (which is related to the Doppler Effect). Each chart is interactive and has an enticing “Play with this data!” link for further exploration.   Chop chop: Martyn Jones published an article on LinkedIn late last year that outlined 7 New Big Data Roles for 2015 as he saw them. The article generated some buzz in Big Data circles, perhaps in part because of the fanciful titles that Jones suggested. He listed ten roles in all (in spite of the article’s title) including Data Trader, Data Taster, and Data Czar. But my favorite was the Data Butcher, who “removes the fat data from the lean data, and provides quality data that can then be subsequently ‘sliced, diced and spiced’ in downstream analytics applications.” The description was accompanied by the image above. (There’s Fred’s data, right near the tail.) Do you have a favorite or trending resource on embedded analytics and data visualization? Share it with the readers of the Actuate blog. Submit ideas to blogactuate@actuate.com or add a comment below. Subscribe (at left) and we’ll email you when new entries are posted. Recent Data Driven Digests: January 16: Tallest buildings, Ohio State’s Elo rating, airport efficiency January 9: Global education, rainfall animation, cutting-edge visualizations January 2: New Year’s Eve, the news in Tweets, nasty flu season  

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Under the Hood – BIRT iHub F-Type: Understanding the Processes

While your customers don’t need to see the inner workings of your app, as a developer, you need to be the master of its parts and processes. It’s time to get under the hood. Hello BIRT community! My name is Jesse Freeman. Although I am not new to BIRT or Actuate, I am transitioning into a significantly more community-centric role. I have spent the last two years working as a Customer Support Engineer for Actuate, specializing in the server and designer products. I am excited to bring my product and support knowledge to the larger BIRT community. I come from a Java/JavaScript background and am a big fan of multi-platform, open source and open standard technologies. I am an advocate of Linux operating systems and have used or dabbled with the majority of the larger Linux distributions. In particular, I am a big fan of Arch Linux and CentOS. Over the next several weeks I will publish a series of blogs that will bring my support knowledge to the community. The series will include posts on understanding the BIRT iHub F-Type’s processes and configuration as well as troubleshooting. This series will provide technical insight for anybody who will be configuring and/or maintaining a BIRT iHub F-Type installation. BIRT iHub F-Type is a free BIRT server released by Actuate. It incorporates virtually all the functionality of commercially available BIRT iHub and is limited only by the capacity of output it can deliver on a daily basis, making it ideal for departmental and smaller scale applications. When BIRT iHub F-Type reaches its maximum output capacity, additional capacity is available as an in-app purchase. Understanding the Processes The first topic of my Under the Hood blog series is titled Understanding the Processes. When I first started in support, one of the first pieces of information I learned was the breakdown of all of the processes and their specific roles. This information was invaluable for the duration of my time providing support. Understanding the processes and their responsibilities provides insight into how the product works for configuration and integration purposes, and helps us understand where to look for more information if an issue arises. With that in mind, here is the list of the BIRT iHub F-Type processes and their responsibilities: ihubd – This is the daemon process responsible for the initial startup of BIRT iHub F-Type. The ihubd process starts the ihubc and ihubservletcontainer processes.  If issues occur during startup, this is one of the first processes to examine. ihubservletcontainer – As the name implies, this process is the front end servlet container for the BIRT iHub F-Type. This process is hosted out of an integrated Tomcat within BIRT iHub, which means anybody who is familiar with Tomcat should feel right at home when configuring or troubleshooting of the process. ihubc – This is the parent of all other processes started by BIRT iHub,  including the ihub, jsrvrihub and jfctsrvrihub processes.  The ihubc is the SOAP endpoint for BIRT iHub’s communication, the job dispatcher, and resource group manager, and also takes requests from front-end applications such as the integrated Information Console. ihub – The ihub process is responsible for communication with the metadata database as well as the Report Server Security Extension (RSSE) if one has been implemented. jsrvrihub – Within a single installation there may be multiple jsrvrihub processes running simultaneously. A typical out-of-the-box installation will have at least two. One of these two typical jsrvrihub processes is used for the viewing of dashboards and the other is used for execution and viewing of reports transiently. jfctsrvrihub – The jfcsrvrihub process is used for the execution of background jobs on BIRT iHub. This includes any report that is explicitly scheduled to run at a specific time (or immediately) and allows reports to be output to a directory within the ihub process rather than viewed immediately within the current browser session. Whether beginning an installation, working on an integration project, or troubleshooting an existing installation,  this information will assist you with knowing the process that needs to be examined. Thank you for reading.  Subscribe to this blog and you will be first to know when I publish my next Under the Hood – BIRT iHub F-Type series with a review of the Primary Configuration Files. Download BIRT iHub F-Type today so you can follow along. If you have any questions, post them in the comments below or in the BIRT iHub F-Type forum. -Jesse

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Extend iHub Interactive Viewer with Fast Filters [Code]

Fifth in a series of blog posts about free extensions to OpenText Interactive Viewer.   Do you want to enable your users to filter a table in an iHub report with just a few clicks?  If a column in a table has just a few discrete values, you can make column-based filtering easy using a technique we call Fast Filter. This post shows how to create a Fast Filter – in short, a selectable drop-down menu of distinct values that appears in the header of a column. (The screenshot above shows how a Fast Filter looks for users.) Users can combine multiple Fast Filters to find the data that they are looking for, because when a user Fast Filters values in one column, the rest of the columns only display values according to their own filters. With Fast Filters, app users don’t have to waste time filtering columns individually or otherwise fine-tuning the data in a table. The steps for creating Fast Filters are: Add a text item to the header of each column that you want to filter on. Change the type of each text item to “HTML”. Copy the following HTML code into each text element. <select id='{COLUMN}_FILTER' onchange='javascript:filterColumn("{COLUMN}")'     style="width:100px;"> </select> Here’s how this looks on screen: In the HTML code for each column header, replace “{COLUMN}” with the dataset column name. In clientscriptsonContextUpdate, paste the code found at the end of this document as shown below. (You can download the code in a text file, or download the Report Design.) You can find clientscriptsOnContentUpdate by clicking on an empty portion of the Layout Manager, clicking on the Script tab, and selecting clientScripts in the first pulldown and onContentUpdate in the second. It will look like this: Add every column that you created a Fast Filter HTML item for to the column list. In the example above,  we are not enabling Fast Filter for the “TOTALREVENUE” column, so our column list is: columns[0] = "COUNTRY"; columns[1] = "PRODUCTVENDOR"; columns[2] = "PRODUCTLINE"; columns[3] = "PRODUCTNAME"; columns[4] = "REVENUEYEAR"; Test your report in OpenText™ Analytics Designer. Troubleshooting If your embed code is not working, try debugging in Chrome. If you add “debugger” in your JavaScript, Chrome will break at that point when Chrome tools debugger is open. Conclusion We can make it easy for users to find the information that they want by simply adding a drop-down to the column header and including a small amount of JavaScript. The next (and final) extension blog entry will demonstrate how to use JSAPI to search multiple columns in a table at the same time. Links to other blog posts in this series: 1. Extend Interactive Viewer with Row Highlighting 2. Extend Interactive Viewer with a Pop-Up Dialog Box  3. Extend iHub Reports and Dashboards with Font Symbols 4. Extend iHub Dashboards with Disqus Discussion Boards 6. Extend Interactive Viewer with Table-Wide Search     Fast Filter Javascript Code var columns = new Array();   this.createFastFilters = function () { debugger; columns[0] = "COUNTRY"; columns[1] = "PRODUCTVENDOR"; columns[2] = "PRODUCTLINE"; columns[3] = "PRODUCTNAME"; //columns[5] = "TOTALREVENUE"; columns[4] = "REVENUEYEAR"; // Initialize the state of each column filter to not filtered. for (var i = 0; i < columns.length; i++) {   if (sessionStorage[columns[i] + ".state"] == null) { sessionStorage[columns[i] + ".state"] = "Not Filtered"; }   } var table = this.getViewer().getTable(); var request = new actuate.data.Request(table.getBookmark(), 0, 100); request.setMaxRows(0); request.setColumns(columns); this.getViewer().downloadResultSet(request,this.addOptions);   }   this.addOptions = function(resultSet) { debugger;   var columnIndex = 0;     var colValue; var i; var found; // Load unique values into dropdowns while (resultSet.next()) { for (columnIndex = 0; columnIndex < columns.length; columnIndex++) { found = false; elem = document.getElementById(columns[columnIndex] + "_FILTER"); if (elem == null)    continue;                                           // Pass on column if not filterable colValue = resultSet.getValue(columnIndex+1) != null ? resultSet.getValue(columnIndex+1) : "-- No Value --";   for (i=0; i<elem.length; i++) {                                       // See if we already put it in the list if (elem.options[i].text == colValue) { found = true; break; } } if (found) continue;   var option=document.createElement("option"); option.text=colValue; try { // for IE earlier than version 8 elem.add(option,elem.options[null]); } catch (e){ elem.add(option,null); } }   } // If the column has too many values or is a number, consolidate.     // Now sort all the column filters and add the top level options for (columnIndex=0; columnIndex < columns.length; columnIndex++) { elem = document.getElementById(columns[columnIndex] + "_FILTER"); if (elem == null)    continue;                                           // Pass on column if not filterable $("#" + columns[columnIndex] + "_FILTER").html($("#" + columns[columnIndex] + "_FILTER option").sort(function(x, y) { return $(x).text() < $(y).text() ? -1 : 1; })) debugger; var option=document.createElement("option"); option.text="<Clear Filter>"; try { // for IE earlier than version 8 elem.add(option,elem.options[0]); } catch (e){ elem.add(option,0); }   option=document.createElement("option"); option.text = sessionStorage[columns[columnIndex] + ".state"];   try { // for IE earlier than version 8 elem.add(option,elem.options[0]); } catch (e){ elem.add(option,0); }   elem.selectedIndex = 0;   }   }   window.myViewerId = this.id; window.filterColumn = function(columnName) {   ddId = columnName + "_FILTER"; var elem = document.getElementById(ddId); var strValue = elem.options[elem.selectedIndex].value; var table = actuate.getViewer(myViewerId).getTable();   debugger; if (strValue=="<Clear Filter>") { table.clearFilters(columnName); sessionStorage[columnName + ".state"] = "Not Filtered"; } else if (strValue=="< Top 5 >") { var filter = new actuate.data.Filter(columnName, actuate.data.Filter.TOP_N, 5); var myVal = filter.getValues(); table.setFilters(filter); sessionStorage[columnName + ".state"] = "Filtered"; elem.selectedIndex = 0; } else if (columnName == "TOTALREVENUE") { var filter = new actuate.data.Filter(columnName, actuate.data.Filter.GREATER_THAN, strValue); var myVal = filter.getValues(); table.setFilters(filter); sessionStorage[columnName + ".state"] = "Filtered"; elem.selectedIndex = 0;   } else { var filter = new actuate.data.Filter(columnName, actuate.data.Filter.EQ, strValue); var myVal = filter.getValues(); table.setFilters(filter); sessionStorage[columnName + ".state"] = "Filtered"; elem.selectedIndex = 0; } table.submit();   }   this.createFastFilters();

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Expert Advice on Embedded BI with Howard Dresner [Webinar]

For once, your CEO and CIO agree on something: Your company needs to embed analytics into its applications. You’ve been tasked with researching which platform is best for you, and you probably have two items on your to-do list: Learn from an industry expert who thoroughly studies the many different embedded analytics platforms, and hear from a company that has successfully embedded analytics into its software. You can do both on January 22 by attending  Embedded BI Market Study with Howard Dresner, a free webinar sponsored by Actuate. Dresner, you probably know, is Chief Research Officer of Dresner Advisory Services, a respected technology analyst firm. Dresner (@howarddresner) coined the term “business intelligence” in 1989 and has studied the market drivers, technologies, and companies associated with BI and analytics ever since. It’s safe to say that nobody knows the sector better. In this webinar, Dresner will highlight the results of his recent Wisdom of Crowds report, the Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study, published in October 2014. Dresner’s study taps the expertise of some 2,500 organizations that use BI tools, focusing specifically on their efforts to embed analytics in other applications. In the webinar, Dresner will cover three main subjects: User intentions for – and perceptions of – embedded analytics, segmented by industry, types of users, architecture and vendor Architecture needs and priorities (such as web services, HTML/iFrame and Javascript API) for embedding, as identified by technologists who implement embedded analytics Ratings of 24 embedded BI vendors, based on both the architecture and features the individual vendors offer, and the reasons Actuate garnered the top ranking To add the user’s perspective, Dresner will then give the floor to Kevin Larnach, Executive Vice President of Operations at Elcom. Larnach will explain how Elcom embeds Actuate’s reporting solution in PECOS, its cloud-based e-procurement solution. Embedded analytics enables users of PECOS – a user base 120,000 strong, in more than 200 organizations, managing nearly $20 billion in total procurement spending annually – to access standard reports, slice and dice data for analysis, create custom reports and presentations of the data, and export transaction history to many different formats, all without IT expertise.  As this diagram shows, PECOS touches all aspects of the procurement process. PECOS users include the Scottish Government (including health services, universities and colleges, and government departments), several health services groups in Britain, the Northern Ireland Assembly, several school districts in the United States, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), and many other organizations and companies. Elcom has identified over a billion dollars in audited savings that its customers have accrued thanks to embedded analytics – more than $500 million in the healthcare sector alone. Elcom’s application is truly an embedded analytics success story. The embedded analytics capability in PECOS, delivered with Actuate technology, is an important competitive differentiator for Elcom. Its competitors’ products either have limited fixed reporting, or don’t offer any standard reporting at all. Those competitors “are scrambling to adopt a flexible embedded approach such as the one enjoyed by PECOS users,” Elcom says. You’re sure to have questions for Dresner and Larnach, so the webinar will include a Q&A session. (An Actuate technical expert will also be on hand if you have specific questions about our embedded analytics capabilities.) The webinar will be accompanied by live Tweets using the hashtag #embeddedanalytics.  Register today.

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Data Driven Digest for January 16

Each Friday we share some favorite reporting on, and examples of, data driven visualizations and embedded analytics that came onto our radar in the past week. Use the “Subscribe” link at left and we’ll email you with new entries.   Tall Order: 2014 was a big year for big buildings. The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (who knew there was such a council?) reported that 97 buildings of 200 meters or taller were completed last year, and the Washington Post turned their data into the cool chart – part bar graph, part illustration – you see above. In short (pun intended), it shows the top 20 as if they were side by side, making for easy height comparison. If anybody needs convincing of China’s construction boom, tell them that half of the 20 tallest skyscrapers raised in 2014 were built in that country.   Pigskin Plot: On Monday night, Ohio State beat University of Oregon 42-20 in the first-ever College Football Playoff National Championship. (A mouthful, but that was the game’s official name.) The win capped off a remarkable season for the Buckeyes, according to the sports data nerds at FiveThirtyEight. Andrew Flowers calculated that Ohio State had the second-highest season ending Elo rating ever (31.7) and found that its rating improved dramatically over the course of the season. Appropriately enough, a plot of team Elo changes (shown above) is shaped like a football.   Project Runway: How efficient is your local airport? The Economist created the chart above showing the world’s 15 busiest airports by passenger volume. The chart is a model of efficiency; along with showing each airport’s passenger volume (the red bar), it shows each one’s size (both as an illustration and in number of square kilometers), along with the number of runways and terminals, present and planned. Comparisons are easy: Denver, huge in size, is dwarfed by Atlanta, which handles almost twice the number of passengers in one-sixth the area. Do you have a favorite or trending resource on embedded analytics and data visualization? Share it with the readers of the Actuate blog. Submit ideas to blogactuate@actuate.com or add a comment below. Subscribe (at left) and we’ll email you when new entries are posted. Recent Data Driven Digests: January 9: Global education, rainfall animation, cutting-edge visualizations January 2: New Year’s Eve, the news in Tweets, nasty flu season December 26: Dudes and bros, football on social media, mapping pictures

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Data Driven Summit – Customers Rave Over Embedded Analytics [Video]

Once in a while a term comes along that encapsulates the spirit of technology so well that it is broadly adopted by business leaders and analysts. Some examples that come to mind include the Cloud (to describe the broader Internet), eCommerce (to describe online business), Big Data (to describe volume, variety and velocity of information) and app (to describe a software application, typically for a mobile device). Recently, the term embedded analytics has resonated with people and organizations that track the next big thing. In a recent article on AllThingsD, Gene Frantz, Principal Fellow at Texas Instruments, gave credibility to the term, noting that “embedded analytics involves gathering data from sensors, processing it in real time, using algorithms to make conclusions and then initiating action.” We at Actuate knew early on that business intelligence was only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to extracting value from business data. The real value lay in the ability to embed analytics in other applications and their business processes. As the data science industry grew over the last 30 years, the platforms and measurement tools to derive context from information shifted. Business leaders today constantly scream out for data to be ubiquitous in any location and on any device. And because Actuate has tracked this trend for years, our products were ready when the concept of embedded analytics became mainstream. Actuate was ranked as the No. 1 vendor in the “Dresner 2014 Embedded Business Intelligence Study.” The study is the latest in Dresner’s “Wisdom of Crowds” series of market insights. (Feel free to browse through the study results yourself) During Data Driven Summit 2014 – Actuate’s annual series of customer events – we heard about the importance of Embedded Analytics from our customers and industry analysts in seven different global centers. Here’s what customers said about embedded analytics at the Data Driven Summit in Santa Clara, Calif. and New York, NY. We’ll be posting more of the Data Driven Summit 2014 video series here, including the other demonstrations, BIRT data visualization insights and panel discussions with industry insiders.

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Data Driven Digest for January 9

Each Friday we share some favorite reporting on, and examples of, data driven visualizations and embedded analytics that came onto our radar in the past week. Use the “Subscribe” link at left and we’ll email you with new entries.   Circle of Learning: Acasus, a Dubai-based consultancy that helps governments to reform education and health policy, worked with Vignette Interactive to create one of the most thought-provoking maps I’ve ever seen. Shown above, it displays the number and percentage of children in the world who reach a basic level of education. The color code shows the percentage (red to green equals low to high) and the circle size shows the number of children. In spite of presenting the data in this manner, the finished product still is clearly recognizable as a map of the earth. It’s beautifully done, and the full interactive version is endlessly interesting.     Wet Ones: Along similar lines, Views of the World is a website created Benjamin Hennig, an academic geographer. He collects maps that visualize earth data – from forestry to tsunamis to demographics ­– in myriad creative forms. One of Hennig’s own creations, shown above and linked here, is an animated map that depicts where precipitation falls over the course of a year.  The map resembles a pumping heart as much as anything (Africa and South America, in particular), and it’s fascinating to watch the rains ebb and flow in regions you know well.   Gallery Show: Take a trip through some extraordinary data visualizations in Beyond The Visualization Zoo, a blog post by Mike Beneth that appeared on Data Science Central this week. Beneth writes about his favorite book on data visualization, then illustrates his book report with some usual entries, such as the hive plot above (click through for the interactive version). His examples are all drawn from the D3 gallery. Beneth’s article reminds us how far data visualization has come – and highlights the challenging frontiers that still lay ahead as we try to visualize new sources like genetic data. Do you have a favorite or trending resource on embedded analytics and data visualization? Share it with the readers of the Actuate blog. Submit ideas to blogactuate@actuate.com or add a comment below. Subscribe (at left) and we’ll email you when new entries are posted. Recent Data Driven Digests: January 2: New Year’s Eve, the news in Tweets, nasty flu season December 26: Dudes and bros, football on social media, mapping pictures December 19: Song titles, gender neutral names, Ruble troubles  

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Top 5 Ways You Win By Upgrading Capacity on BIRT iHub F-Type

Upgrades are often worth the cost: Extra leg room for your 12-hour flight; extra-large on your order of French fries; extra data-out capacity on your BIRT iHub F-Type server for data driven apps with embedded analytics. BIRT iHub F-Type is the free BIRT server from Actuate for boosting open source and Java developer productivity. It incorporates virtually all the functionality of commercially available BIRT iHub Visualization Platform. Within the first 15 minutes of installing BIRT iHub F-Type, a developer can import a BIRT report, schedule secure distribution, or export their report as a full-function Excel spreadsheet. Companies of all sizes are currently test-driving BIRT iHub F-Type and evaluating Actuate’s data visualization and reporting technology for integrating analytic functionality into their customer-facing apps before launching them at a bigger scale. Currently, BIRT iHub F-Type is limited only by the capacity of output it can deliver on a daily basis. This makes BIRT iHub F-Type ideal for departmental and smaller scale applications. But sometimes you need more, so when BIRT iHub F-Type reaches its maximum daily output, additional capacity is available as an in-app purchase. Actuate now offers an easy way to expand capacity while in the application. Starting this month, customers can purchase data-out for their F-Type installations in increments of daily 50MB for as little as $6,000 per year. No long-term commitments needed, you only pay for 12 months. Here are five great reasons to upgrade your daily capacity to your BIRT iHub F-Type account: Deliver insights from multiple RDBMS data sources, high volume real-time data, social media and big data sources Embed reports, dashboards and individual visualizations into your own apps with the JavaScript API Enjoy enterprise-grade report and task scheduling, email notifications, secure sharing and row-level data security already built into BIRT iHub F-Type Export to Excel (including formulas), PDF,  PowerPoint and XML formats with ease Interact with on-page data analysis, drag-and-drop dashboards, crosstab analytics and HTML5 active visualizations And if you find that you need to increase your daily data-out limit even further, you can purchase additional data-out expansion packs in 50MB increments without having to call your IT department. Add additional data packs at any time based on your actual usage needs, and credit for the unused part of your existing data-out plan will be applied toward the upgraded plan. In order to gauge how much data will be consumed, BIRT iHub F-Type tool monitors usage and prompts the developer within the software when limits may exceed current capacity. Once you download, install and activate your BIRT iHub F-Type account, you’ll want to check out a series of 30-minute live sessions designed to get you up to speed on BIRT iHub F-Type. Attend at least one session and you are eligible to enter the first ever BIRT iHub F-Type Pro Awards Program. Submissions will be reviewed by an independent jury of professionals. Awards will be handed out to the competition’s winners on a bi-weekly, monthly and quarterly basis. We’ll post additional details here soon, so subscribe (at left) and you’ll be the first to know!

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Extend iHub Dashboards with Disqus Discussion Boards [Code]

Fourth in a series of blog posts about free extensions to OpenText Interactive Viewer. Do you want to enable your users to add comments and annotations to an iHub Dashboard, but don’t want to code a discussion board from scratch yourself?  This post will walk you through how to embed a Disqus discussion board – a popular, familiar format your users see every day on the web – in an iHub Dashboard, as shown above. This post is also a case study for how to embed a web service into a Dashboard.  You can use this technique to embed virtually anything, even a Jaspersoft or Tableau report. The steps for creating a Disqus Gadget are: Create an account at disqus.com and add your website using the “Add Disqus to Your Site” button. We will install the Disqus “Universal Code”.  Read the directions on the Disqus website for details. Make your iHub installation a “trusted site” for Disqus. If you do not make iHub a trusted site, Disqus will return an error message. Click on the setup instructions for the Universal Code platform on the Disqus web site. Copy the HTML code to your clipboard. Create a new file and paste the HTML code into the new file. We recommend giving your file a *.html or *.htm extension and leaving it in the Dashboards folder of your BIRT application. Above the line that creates the disqus_shortname variable, create a variable named disqus_url and set its value to the URL of your iHub website. We recommend using a custom name that is linked to the dashboard name so you know where the discussion board is embedded when you view logs on the Disqus admin site.  The finished embed code should look like this: <div id="disqus_thread"></div> <script type="text/javascript"> /* * * CONFIGURATION VARIABLES: EDIT BEFORE PASTING INTO YOUR WEBPAGE * * */ var disqus_url = 'http:// <changeme>/iportal/gadgetTest'; var disqus_shortname = '<changeme>'; // required: replace example with your forum shortname /* * * DON'T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */ (function() { var dsq = document.createElement('script'); dsq.type = 'text/javascript'; dsq.async = true; dsq.src = '//' + disqus_shortname + '.disqus.com/embed.js'; (document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0] || document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0]).appendChild(dsq); })(); </script> <noscript>Please enable JavaScript to view the <a href="http://disqus.com/?ref_noscript">comments powered by Disqus.</a></noscript>  Edit a Dashboard from OpenText™ Analytics Designer or iHub. Insert a HTML Gadget into the dashboard. The menu path is Insert/Extra…/HTML. Decide whether you want to want to embed the code via URL or HTML. The Gadget works the same regardless of how you decide to embed the code, so the option that you choose is really personal preference. This screenshot shows the URL option: To use a URL, save the Disqus code in an HTML document, upload the HTML document to your iHub server, and click on the HTML file. (The Disqus board should appear as in the screenshot below.) Copy and paste the URL into the URL box, as seen above. It will appear as shown below. To use HTML, copy and paste the code into the HTML box as shown in the screenshot immediately above. Click OK after editing the items in the General tab. The General tab is also where you set things like the Gadget title and text alignment. The Disqus discussion board should appear in the Gadget. You are done! There are other Disqus settings that you can choose from. Read about them on the Disqus website. Please visit the following iHub Developer Forum thread for more information about displaying files on a Dashboard. Troubleshooting If your embed code does not work in the Gadget in the Dashboard, try debugging in Chrome. The default encoded URL in the HTML Gadget is can be really long and may break your web service.   iHub also returns a long, convoluted URL to web services, so you may have to set the URL manually as we did for Disqus in the Javascript disqus_URL variable. Conclusion On a high level, this blog post shows how to extend our OpenText Analytics services by embedding a web service in an HTML Gadget, either using a URL or by pasting code directly into the HTML pane.  There are existing third-party web services for virtually any type of functionality that you would want to add to a Dashboard, and any of them can be added just as easily as Disqus.  The HTML Gadget capability in iHub renders any valid HTML5 code, including the standard code for embedding SaaS applications.  As we noted earlier, this means that you can embed virtually anything as a web service in a Dashboard – including a Jaspersoft or Tableau report. The next extension blog will demonstrate how to use JSAPI to search multiple columns in a table at the same time. 1. Extend Interactive Viewer with Row Highlighting 2. Extend Interactive Viewer with a Pop-Up Dialog Box  3. Extend iHub Reports and Dashboards with Font Symbols 5. Extend iHub Interactive Viewer with Fast Filters 6. Extend Interactive Viewer with Table-Wide Search  

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Designing Data Visualizations for Mobile Devices [Webinar]

Did you make any New Year’s Resolutions? If you did, “exercise more” is probably on your list. Year after year, it’s consistently among the most common resolutions. That’s because we know that moving makes us stronger – and science shows that it makes us smarter, more energetic, and more productive too. (That’s why the guy in the next office just got a standup desk with a treadmill under it – and got the boss to pay for it.) The same goes for business data: If you can get data moving, it can make your organization better in many important ways. That’s why in 2015,  companies are resolving to get their data out of storage silos and onto mobile devices. They’re building mobile apps – complete with embedded data visualizations – to put data in the hands of employees, partners and customers who need it, want it, and can take action on it. If you and your company made this resolution for 2015, be sure to check out Designing Data Visualizations for Mobile Devices, a webinar presented by Allen Bonde (@abonde), Actuate’s VP of Product Marketing & Innovation. Along with David Rubenstein, Editor in Chief of SD Times (@SDTimes),  Bonde walks through the business imperative for mobile data visualizations, the must-have features of mobile apps, and some best practices for success. The webinar is now available for free replay. Bonde’s best practices are summed up in three yellow text blocks in this slide: Embed – Data visualizations belong in your existing apps, so the tools and platforms you choose must work with common standards and leverage APIs for data access, but still be lightweight, easy to customize, and brand-friendly. This includes the ability to white label a data visualization – that is, make it blend seamlessly into a larger app or portal, complete with design preferences such as colors and fonts. Automate! – Data visualizations on mobile devices – particularly when you’re talking about wearables such as smartwatches – need to respect the device. Nobody’s going to read a chart of numbers on a 320×320-pixel screen, but they’d gladly receive an alert on that screen saying that a key customer is requesting more information or a product they want has gone on sale. And if that alert can be linked to an action ­– call the customer, or buy the product – your mobile data visualization becomes a powerful productivity tool. Interact + Reuse – Data visualizations on mobile devices are most powerful when they’re interactive – when a tablet user can learn, with simple touch, which product or segment a sparkline, bar or pie slice represents, then drill to the data below. And if all apps (desktop and mobile) leverage the same data and development tools, businesses can boost app performance and drive reuse, which makes developers more productive. But remember: Tools must be powerful and flexible, because not all devices and users are created equal. Bonde’s presentation also covers mobile development models and makes the case for the native/hybrid model (also described by Actuate’s Daniel Melcher in a two-part blog post). Perhaps the most powerful takeaway from the one-hour webinar is an Enterprise Mobile Checklist that Bonde shared toward the end of the event. Reproduced below, the checklist recaps five crucial elements that designers and developers must consider when creating data visualizations for mobile devices. If you’re resolved to get your data moving in 2015, it’ worth an hour of your time to view Designing Data Visualizations for Mobile Devices. Put on your headphones, hop on your neighbor’s treadmill while he’s at lunch (the boss won’t mind – and we can all use the cardio), and watch it today.

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Data Driven Summit – Embedded Apps and the Internet of Things [Video]

By the end of 2014, there will be more mobile phones on the planet than humans. So, how will we harness these devices to better inform and connect users to their information? And what do we need to consider to truly deliver insights “to everyone, everywhere?” Actuate’s VP of BIRT Solutions, Pierre Tessier (@PuckPuck) set out to answer some of these questions during Data Driven Summit 2014 – Actuate’s annual series of customer events. Tessier’s session outlined the latest thinking around mobile and embedded apps, including what’s possible when it comes to delivering visualizations on non-traditional platforms. The backdrop of this discussion is the explosion of mobile apps and sensors creating new data sources. Businesses of all sizes are looking to third parties to develop tools that help sort through this deluge of data and provide insight. Smart app developers embed these third-party tools into a seamless customer experience. Tessier first outlined the four primary ways that companies are approaching mobile development: Native, Mobile Web, Hybrid and Native/Hybrid. Of course the development of mobile applications – including tapping into the Internet of Things – must be appropriate for today’s data consumer. “It’s clear they are mobile-first, so we need to strive for being relevant, proactive and timely in our interactions,” Tessier said during his presentation. “From a development perspective, we also need to look to reuse, automate and embed this data.” When data components are centralized, it’s easier to create and send automatic alerts to a wearable device (a Samsung or Apple watch, for example) based on location, preference or other events. (See this scenario in action in a demonstration presented by Tessier and Mark Gamble.) Alerts are great for connecting to consumers as they interact with brand assets like display ads or retail locations. Data connects users to your brand via apps and experiences. This capability ranked very high on industry expert Howard Dresner’s latest embedded business intelligence report. “Embedding analytics and insights within non-traditional devices is a huge opportunity … and our approach keeps mobile and wearable apps lightweight, easy to customize and brand-friendly,” Tessier said noting that BIRT has always been a perfect way for companies to white label Actuate’s technology. Here’s that discussion in full at the Data Driven Summit in Santa Clara, Calif. We’ll be posting more of the Data Driven Summit 2014 video series here, including the other demonstrations, BIRT data visualization insights and panel discussions with industry insiders. Subscribe (at left) to be informed when new videos are posted.

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Announcing December’s Community Contributor Leaderboard

I’m pleased to announce the members of the BIRT Developer Center Community Leaderboard for December 2014. The purpose of this Leaderboard is to honor the top contributors to the community each month and to have a little fun. Scores are also posted in the Developer Center Community. You can recognize past and current Leaderboard members by special badges on their forum and DevShare posts:        December 2014 Leaderboard Scores mblock 108 kclark 57 pricher 45 cwong 27 wwilliams 21 donino 21 Matthew L. 12 JFreeman 12 VSafonov 11   Click for Past LeaderboardsTo determine the leaders, each contribution made by a Developer Center Community member is assigned a weighted point score that roughly corresponds to its effort/value. For example, starting a forum topic by asking a question will score you 1 point and answering someone’s question scores 3 points. Members with the top summed scores each month are declared the leaders for that month and posted to the Leaderboard. Over time we evolve the scoring system as needed for fairness and value to the community. We even give points for rating forum posts. So please contribute to the Developer Center Community. It’s not difficult to get a decent score and we’d love to see you on the Leaderboard next month! You can find details on the Community Leaderboard page. If you have any suggestions or comments, please add them to the comments section below.

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Data Driven Digest for January 2, 2015

Each Friday we share some favorite reporting on, and examples of, data driven visualizations and embedded analytics that came onto our radar in the past week. Use the “Subscribe” link at left and we’ll email you with new entries.   Wake Up Already: How late did you stay up on New Year’s Eve? Brandon Wilt, principal data scientist at Jawbone, used data collected last year from hundreds of thousands of people worldwide who wear his company’s fitness bracelets to come up with the map above. Click through the image or visit this link for the full interactive map, background on the data, and further analysis.   Tweet The News: Market research firm Eschelon Insights analyzed 184.5 million Twitter mentions to graph what Americans were talking about on that social network in 2014. A snippet of the infographic they created is above, but click through to see the whole thing – which includes a weekly breakdown by share of conversation, comparisons of political insiders and activists against Americans as a whole, and more. Sick of Data: I’m typing this from home because I don’t want to share the flu with my Actuate colleagues. Yes, in spite of getting my flu shot, washing my hands regularly, and taking other usual precautions, the bug found me. Turns out I’m not alone; the 2014-2015 flu season is shaping up to be a nasty one, according to the New York Times and as illustrated by the chart above (which shows visits to doctors’ offices and hospitals for flu-like symptoms through mid-December, compared with past years). Several factors, including a mismatch in this year’s vaccine, are contributing to the situation. Google Flu Trends (which we wrote about back on November 7, 2014) shows the same thing. Do you have a favorite or trending resource on embedded analytics and data visualization? Share it with the readers of the Actuate blog. Submit ideas to blogactuate@actuate.com or add a comment below. Subscribe (at left) and we’ll email you when new entries are posted. Recent Data Driven Digests: December 26: Dudes and Bros, football on social media, mapping pictures December 19: Song titles, gender neutral names, Ruble troubles December 12: California drought, shopping season, visualizing sounds of Manhattan

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Data Driven Summit – 8 Tips to Big Data Visualization and UX Design [Video]

Big Data may be the driving force for a lot of business decisions these days, but unless the data is properly presented, the context and insight derived from that data will be lost. That was the theme of many of our presentations and discussions during Data Driven Summit 2014 – Actuate’s annual series of customer events. It’s that need to make context out of Big Data that inspired Director of Technical Marketing, Mark Gamble (@heygamble) to present eight tips for creating more effective data visualizations. While giving some historical context, Gamble showed how Big Data visualizations created with BIRT Designer create the most compelling user experiences. His talk, entitled “Every Picture Tells A Story Don’t It?” invoked best practices from visualization design luminaries such as Edward Tufte (@EdwardTufte) and his “5 Grand Principles Of Data Visualization” as well as Stephen Few and his “7 Core Design Principles For Displaying Quantitative Information.” But being a BIRT expert himself, Gamble added his own take on optimizing user experiences within the Big Data visualization realm. “Data Visualizations are typically employed for quantitative summarization, such as infographics or dashboards. While Big Data presents unique challenges for visualization, the fundamentals of good information design apply,” Gamble said during the talk. Gamble then showed eight great recommendations on how to choose the appropriate visual for specific types of information. He also showed how he uses the BIRT Designer for building these data driven reports and dashboards. The recommendations are: Tracking values over time is best displayed as either line charts or area charts Comparisons across categories are best visualized as column or bar charts Comparing percentage values against a whole lends itself towards pie charts or donut charts Displaying current values for regions, states, countries and/or terrains can use color-coded maps Animated visuals increase value and interest among users Pivot the X-axis to vertical alignment if category values are too long Show bars sorted by value only when you want to convey ranking On a line chart, show data point markers only if you need to convey specific values Here’s the video of Gamble’s presentation at the Data Driven Summit in Santa Clara, Calif. We’ll be posting more of the Data Driven Summit 2014 video series here, including the other demonstrations, BIRT data visualization insights and panel discussions with industry insiders.  

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Getting Clear and Clean on Analytics

Analytics rules the world of Big Data. You need to be cool? Just add the word “analytics” to your company name or product. But the cool factor related to that word makes me puzzled and confused. The word analytics means different things to different people, and some people might say the word means anything to anybody. It’s far from easy to nail down exactly what is behind the word analytics. Let me try to clarify the word as I understand it, based upon how different users interact with and visualize data. I’ve earlier categorized users into one of four types – Content viewers, data discoverers, query experts and content creators – in this post. For Content Viewers, Analytics Means Visual Insights and Filters Content viewers need analytics essentially related to the visualizations that they are presented. At the most basic level, this means  information that is displayed correctly and provides inherent insights without the need of any user interaction. A step up would be HTML5 graphs providing some native analytic capabilities such as zooming, changing a timeline and filtering. Filters and selectors allow a user to visualize a subset of the information with a click of the mouse. Interactive viewing is particularly helpful for tabular data, because content viewers can create personalized views of data by modifying a title or by grouping and aggregating data in a meaningful way. For Data Discoverers, Analytics Means Drill-down, Compare and Segment A data discoverer does not really know what he or she is looking for. The tools at his disposal, typically dashboards, give the possibility to drill-down to a more detailed level of information to answer questions, such as Why was there a sudden spike of activity? Another popular requirement for data discoverers is the capacity to compare information. How I am doing compared to last year? Finally, these users often need to identify a sub-population by creating customer segments – for marketing purposes for example. For Query Experts, Analytics Means Scoring and Predicting Query Experts, typically data scientists, design and apply algorithms to the data in order to extract value. The purpose of these algorithms can be anything from predicting churn to optimizing a shopping basket. For some this is the hard-core analytics. But we should bear in mind that most users, who are in reality content viewers, would be happy receiving an alert and visualizing an outcome. For Content Creators, Analytics Means Data Design and Blending Content creators are a special category of users, because they create content for others. Analytics are mostly used upfront, by preparing the data in such a way that it can easily be analyzed. The fact that data comes from different sources (possibly ranging from a small Excel file up to a big Hadoop cluster) is an important element for them. The phrase “data blending” covers this usage nicely. So, with all this in mind, did I hear correctly you wanted to display analytics on a Dashboard? What do you mean, exactly? A Dashboard means a lot of different things to different people, or anything to anybody. (That sounds familiar, doesn’t it? We’ll discuss dashboards in a future post.)

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Top 10 News Stories from Actuate for 2014

This has been a huge year at Actuate. Between new products, acquisitions, and growth in our community, we’ve been busy providing great software across all of our divisions that help our customers meet their challenges in novel ways. Today, as 2014 winds down,  we’re highlighting ten of our biggest news stories of the year.     January 21: Actuate Patents PDF Accessibility Solution for Automated Tagging and Delivery of High Volume Content to the Visually Impaired. We were proud to kick off the year by receiving U.S. Patent 8619272, called “Automated Assistive Technology for the Visually Impaired,” for our PDF Accessibility Solution. This software integrates with an organization’s existing document management system to capture high volume print streams and automatically create properly tagged, accessible documents. February 5: Actuate Acquires legodo ag to Expand its Accessible Customer Communications Management Solution. The company develops software for generation of personalized customer correspondence via any communication channel, including mobile devices, and its software allows organizations to tap into their existing ERP, CRM, and other applications when creating customer communications. February 6: Actuate Launches New Generation of BIRT Content Services to Streamline End-to-End Accessible Customer Communications Management. Called BIRT Content Services 5.0, this new version of Actuate’s CCM product is now integrated with the BIRT iHub 3 deployment platform to enable end-to-end management of high volume customer communications. April 9: Actuate Introduces Document Accessibility Appliance to Automate Remediation of High Volumes of e-Delivered Customer Communications for Access by Vision-Impaired Customers. This virtual software appliance converts high volumes of electronically delivered documents into universally accessible PDF files (PDF/UA). Complying with WCAG 2.0 standards, the appliance helps organizations format and tag statements, bills, invoices, explanation of benefits and policy documents. May 7: BIRT Gains 500,000 New Developer Customers in Six Months; Community Grows to More than 3.5 Million BIRT Developers Worldwide. A quarterly survey by an independent, global developer research firm found that the community of BIRT developers keeps growing. “[T]he growth in the number of developers following Actuate is clearly reflected in the surge in our social media engagement levels,” said Nobby Akiha, Actuate’s Senior Vice President of Marketing. “Actuate’s BIRT social media profile continues to grow organically, with new followers on Facebook, Twitter and Google+, indicating a vibrant and active BIRT community. We have also observed a 50% increase in the number of visitors to our new developer.actuate.com site since its introduction last fall.” July 10:Actuate Launches BIRT iHub F-Type – Free Server for Over 3.5 Million BIRT Developers Building Data-driven Reports, Visualizations and Applications. A freemium version of our enterprise deployment platform, BIRT iHub F-Type has metered output capacity that can be expanded with an in-app purchase. Within 15 minutes of downloading BIRT iHub F-Type, a developer can import a BIRT report, schedule secure distribution, and export their report as a full-function Excel spreadsheet. Interactive personalization capabilities are automatically enabled, and developers can use BIRT iHub F-Type to embed dynamic reports and visualizations in applications. July 21: Actuate Announces BIRT Analytics 4.4 for Even Easier and Faster Big Data Advanced Analytics for Business Professionals. Our upgraded big data analytics platform for business analysts and users got powerful new algorithms and functionalities. “BIRT Analytics allows the business professional a way to easily explore and pivot billions of rows of data in seconds, while gaining immediate insights though visual representations of statistical models and advanced analytic techniques,” said Peter Hoopes, General Manager of Actuate’s BIRT Analytics Group. August 11: BIRT PowerDocs from Actuate is Now Available for the Salesforce1 Mobile App – Empowering Companies to Run their Businesses from Their Phones. Available in 10+ languages, BIRT PowerDocs is a cloud-based app designed to automatically incorporate ERP and CRM data and simplify generation of customer sales quotations and other correspondence within Salesforce1. It’s available for test drive and deployment on the Salesforce AppExchange. October 21: Actuate, Braille Works and Venatôre Collaborate to Deliver Industry’s First Cloud-Based Document Accessibility Service. Through key partnerships we expanded our offerings for the visually impaired community and for organizations that must comply with regulations such as Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. “Equal access to information is a basic right that every government agency must afford to individuals with vision loss,” said Paul Schroeder, vice president of Programs and Policy for the American Foundation for the Blind. “The Cloud508 service makes it possible to generate information in accessible formats to meet the access needs of people who are blind or visually impaired.” December 5: Actuate Signs Agreement to be Acquired by OpenText. The next chapter in Actuate’s story should begin within a few weeks. From the press release: “The addition of Actuate enables OpenText to enhance their products with embedded analytics as well as enter a growing market. Together Actuate and OpenText will seek to extend the benefits of embedded analytics to more geographies and industries.” We had to make some tough choices to whittle this list down to just ten entries. While we haven’t noted them all here, we’re also proud of our increasing profile among analysts and experts including Conformit, Dresner Advisory Services and Forrester; our growing profile in developer, open source, and social media communities; and our satisfied customers and partners like Phototype, IDS, and New York City Transit Authority who step up share their success stories. And we’re very proud of our Data Driven Summits, so we’re sharing videos of many great demos and panel discussions on the Actuate blog. With all of this in mind, 2015 promises to be another banner year for Actuate. We’re glad to have you – our customers, partners and prospects – with us during this exciting time. Subscribe to our blog (at left) and you’ll be the first to know when the next big things happen. Calendar image by Dafne Cholet.   

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Data Driven Summit – Analysts Weigh in on the Future of Embedded Analytics [Video]

When planning the future of your business, it’s always good to consult with the experts. That’s why Actuate brought together a panel of industry analysts at our recent Data Driven Summits to help attendees make sense of the tea leaves pointing to the need for more data driven apps. The latest forecasts from analysts with IDC indicate business investments in visual data discovery tools will grow 2.5x faster than rest of the business intelligence market and that enabling self-service through customer-facing apps will become a requirement for all enterprises by 2018. Lots of great questions were asked of the panel: “What are the market drivers shaping today’s customer facing applications?” “How do experts see embedded analytics becoming a game changer?” The answers are driving new approaches to application development – and the evolution of Actuate’s iHub platform. During Data Driven Summit 2014 – Actuate’s annual series of customer events – Actuate VP of Product Marketing & Innovation, Allen Bonde (@abonde) sat down with expert analysts Esteban Kolsky (@ekolsky) with thinkJar and Shaku Atre (@ShakuAtre) with Atre Group to explore market trends, hot tips, and their predictions for 2015 and beyond. While both panelists were impressed with the reach and scope of applications that dip into Big Data, each stressed the importance of context and user experience to compliment the data being analyzed. “For a system to qualify as a Big Data System, it must address the needs of all type of users, their varied demands and various technologies they are using,” Atre said during the discussion. Atre also stressed that smart apps developed for customers must address five areas to be successful. Visualization Interaction Easy deployment of the ubiquitous technology, ‘Cleverness’ used in novel ways to implement data driven decision-making at mobile speed Business Interfaces: today’s and potentially tomorrow’s using analytics   Here’s the video of their discussion at the Data Driven Summit in Santa Clara, Calif. We’ll be posting more of the Data Driven Summit 2014 video series here, including the other demonstrations, BIRT data visualization insights and panel discussions with industry insiders. Subscribe (at left) to be informed when new videos are posted.  

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How To: Scrolling Crosstab with Fixed Row Headers

A few weeks ago, I saw a question in the forums about fixing the left column of a table while allowing the rest of the columns to scroll. In this blog, I’ll walk through the solution I proposed for the issue, with one difference: I’ll set this up on a crosstab. This seems like a more valid case because of the higher likelihood of not knowing how many columns you’ll end up with. Initial Report Setup For this example, I used the Classic Models Sample Database with the query: In the data set, I also created a computed column that will be used later to help fix the row dimension column. The computed column is a concatenated listing of the values in the row dimension field. You can see how the computed column is set up, below: Once you’ve created your data set, you’ll also create your data cube. For this example, my cube is set up as shown here: Now that we have our data cube set up, we can lay out our design. First, we’ll add the containing grid. Add a 1 column, 1 row grid to your layout. Select the grid cell, go to the Property Editor’s General section, and set the overflow property to “Scroll.” Next, create your crosstab inside the grid. Use the date grouping for the column dimension. Use the productline field as the row dimension (the dimension that we’ll fix into place). Use the lineprice as our measure field. Select the General tab in the Property Editor for the crosstab and select the “Hide Measure Header” check box. Set the width of a cell in the productline column to 1.5 inches. Set the width of a cell in the measure column to 0.85 inches. Add your desired styling to the crosstab. Double click on the month column dimension and edit it to look like the following: With the month element still selected, go to the Property Editor and set the DateTime Format to Custom with a format code of “MMMM” (This will give us January, February, etc. instead of 1, 2, etc.). Also set the Number Format for the measure element to Currency. The resulting layout can be seen below: If we run the report as is, we get a scrolling crosstab, but as we scroll to the right, you lose sight of what product line is associated with each row. Fixing the Row Dimension Column Fixing the product line column requires client-side scripting, so this solution will only work in HTML and the Web Viewer. To set this up, we need to start by setting up bookmarks on crosstab cells. These bookmarks become the elements’ IDs so we can access them with our client-side script. Select the cell with the “Year” label in it, go to the Advanced section in the Property Editor, and set the Bookmark to “cella”. For the “Month” label cell, do the same except set the Bookmark to “cellb”. For the actual dimension cell, we’ll have to use a dynamic value. For this Bookmark, set it to data[“PRODUCTLINE”]. The last step will be to create an HTML text control that will contain our client-side script. Drag a Text element from the Palette into your layout below your crosstab. In the text element editor, select “HTML” from the drop down and enter the following HTML code and select ok. In the binding tab of the Property Editor, bind the text element to the data set we created above. The word “replaced” in the second row gets exactly that…replaced. This is where our computed column we created earlier comes in. In the onCreate script of the text element, you’ll put the code: That’s it. Now when we run our report and scroll to the right, we can see our product lines the entire way across: Thanks for reading. You can see more blog posts from me, here. Also, feel free to follow me on Twitter or friend me on Facebook. If you have any questions or comments, either use the comments section below or visit the BIRT forums. The report used in this blog can be found in the BIRT Developer Center community devShare. -Michael

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Data Driven Summit in New York City [Video]

Live from New York, it’s Data Driven Summit 2014! Actuate customers and partners shared the latest and greatest news in embedded analytics and the apps of tomorrow. The New York City event capped off a seven-city tour that explored the development of the Next Big App, and covered topics such as strategy, architecture, visualization, customer experience, embedding and mobility.   Presentations included a keynote by Actuate President and CEO Pete Cittadini, Actuate’s Senior VP of Marketing Nobby Akiha moderating a panel of customers, and live demonstrations of BIRT iHub and BIRT Analytics with Allen Bonde (@abonde), Mark Gamble (@heygamble) and Pierre Tessier (@puckpuck).   Customers interviewed in this video include: Heather Fraser, NY Central Mutual Fire Insurance Company (@nycminsurance) Anthony Cramer, NYC Transit Authority (@mta) Kevin Larnach, Elcom International (@elcomusa) John M. Johnson, Dell Services (@DellServices)   Here are the highlights of the NYC event at the Marriott Marquis in Times Square: Find out more about Data Driven Summit at Actuate’s Customer Events page. Download your FREE copy of BIRT iHub F-Type (including Live Training sessions) at the F-Type page. We’ll be posting more of the Data Driven Summit 2014 video series here, including the other demonstrations, BIRT data visualization insights and panel discussions with industry insiders. Subscribe (at left) to be informed when new videos are posted.

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Data Driven Digest for December 26

Each Friday we share some favorite reporting on, and examples of, data driven visualizations and embedded analytics that came onto our radar in the past week. Use the “Subscribe” link at left and we’ll email you with new entries.   Bros and Cons: Dudes everywhere raised a White Russian this week to celebrate the Library of Congress enshrining “The Big Lebowski” in its National Film Registry. Is it coincidence that Quartz published an interactive map this week showing the popularity of the word “dude” on Twitter? Working with data from forensic linguist Jack Grieve and “several billion” tweets collected by Dianshen Guo of USC, Quartz’s interactive map also tracks “bro,” “buddy,” “fella” and “pal.” Winning Online: When we talk sports around the office, my colleague Brian often offers this insightful observation: “The team with the most points at the end of the game wins 100% of the time.”  But teams today compete off the field, too; football clubs (Americans call them “soccer teams”) are in cutthroat competition for social media followers. Jamie Jackson at The Guardian has gathered and analyzed stats on the teams that win at Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and YouTube here. No surprise, but clubs that are victorious on the pitch aren’t necessarily the winners in cyberspace. Map Your Pics: If you like to take pictures with your phone when you travel, you can use the geotagging feature of your photos to create a map showing the places you’ve been. That’s what Marco Altini did to generate the map above. He lays out his inspiration and method in a blog post and shares his R script code on GitHub. One benefit of Altini’s method: it works even if you don’t consistently have location tracking turned on. Do you have a favorite or trending resource on embedded analytics and data visualization? Share it with the readers of the Actuate blog. Submit ideas to blogactuate@actuate.com or add a comment below. Subscribe (at left) and we’ll email you when new entries are posted.   Recent Data Driven Digests: December 19: Song titles, gender neutral names, Ruble troubles December 12: California drought, shopping season, visualizing sounds of Manhattan December 5: Human movement, animated infographics, transit efficiency

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