Meha Varier

Meha Varier
Meha Varier is the Director of Product Marketing for OpenText’s Output Transformation (formerly Actuate Content Services) group. She is the voice of the customer within the division and is responsible for defining and communicating the business and technical value proposition for the Output Transformation suite of products.

DoJ Delays Accessibility Rules for Document Publishers

The U.S. Department of Justice (DoJ) announced in November that it’s holding off until the 2018 fiscal year on publishing the proposed rules to make commercial websites accessible under Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). This announcement, published in the department’s Statement of Regulatory Priorities for Fall 2015, comes roughly four years after the DoJ first said it would issue rules for how companies and other providers of “public accommodations” have to make their websites accessible to visitors with disabilities. Even though the DoJ is delaying requirements that apply to commercial websites, covered under Title III of the ADA, it will proceed with publishing Title II amendments (applying to state and local government websites) this month, January 2016. The DoJ believes the smaller Title II project will give it valuable insights and create the necessary infrastructure for broad commercial website accessibility under Title III. Whenever the Title III changes do go into effect, any company with a website will have to carefully review its content to make sure it’s accessible to the widest possible range of readers. What is the Americans with Disabilities Act and Title III Amendment? As a refresher, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in all areas of public life and in the activities of places of public accommodation, including jobs, schools, transportation, and all public and private places that are open to the general public. It became law in 1990. The ADA revisions are to establish requirements for making the goods, services, facilities, privileges, accommodations, or advantages offered by public accommodations via the Internet accessible to individuals with disabilities. Under the ADA Title III amendment, achieving website accessibility is defined as being compliant with Level AA guidelines of the WCAG 2.0 (Web Content Accessibility Guidelines) standard. Title III applies to websites of commercial businesses and non-profit service providers – privately operated entities that own, operate, lease, or lease to places of public accommodation, such as large corporations, restaurants, movie theaters, schools, retail stores, doctor’s offices, recreation facilities, etc. as well as commercial facilities such as factories, warehouses or office buildings. The Federal Rulemaking Process To provide some context around the delay to the Title III amendment NPRM being published, let’s review the US Federal Government rulemaking process. The federal rulemaking process is a detailed, often multi-year endeavor that is used to establish new regulations or updates to regulations with the help of public participation. Following are the key stages of the process: Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM): Preliminary stages of rulemaking that publishes the agency’s initial analysis and provides the public with an opportunity to provide comments and participate in rule-making. Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM): Publishes actual language of proposed rule in the Federal Register, addresses comments made during the NPRM stage and solicits further comments from the public. Final Rule: Usually the proposed rule becomes the final rule with some minor adjustments. Judicial Review: This is when the courts review the rule in greater detail to address any lawsuits filed by the public and to ensure the agency has not exceeded its rulemaking authority and has followed the proper process for public comments. Effective Date: The rule generally does not become effective for some time after its publication to allow affected parties to come into compliance. The ADA Title III amendment is currently at the “ANPRM published” stage, with the comment period for the ANPRM closed. The next step is to publish the NPRM after taking into account comments received for the ANPRM, which is now expected to occur sometime in 2018. History of the ADA Title III Amendment Timelines The Title III NPRM publication date has been extended 7 times since the ANPRM was published in 2011. Original Date of NPRM Publication Changed To Update Made In January 2012 December 2012  – December 2012 December 2013  – December 2013 March 2014 Spring 2013 March 2014 April 2014 Fall 2013 April 2014 March 2015 Spring 2014 March 2015 June 2015 Fall 2014 June 2015 2018 – month TBD Fall 2015 While the NPRM publication has been delayed, there is no indication that the DoJ will stop monitoring and addressing litigation against commercial organizations for website accessibility. In fact, the DoJ continues to formulate settlement agreements and issue penalties of up to $150,000 for web and web content accessibility violations and order compensation to complainants as required. Therefore, large commercial organizations must continue to plan for and execute on implementing accessibility for websites and web content. OpenText provides a software-based automated solution for generating accessible documents in high volumes, e.g. for statements, bills, notices and more. The OpenText Automated Output Accessibility solution enables companies to generate accessible PDFs in WCAG 2.0 Level AA compliant PDF/UA format, eliminating the need for traditional costly and time-consuming manual remediation processes. Learn more about the solution and contact us today to book a demo.  

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Delivering Insights Interactively in a Customer-Centric World

Consumers today expect access to their information from wherever they are, at any time and from any device. This includes information such as statements, bills, invoices, explanations of benefits, and other transactional records that help them better understand their relationship with a business. What’s more, they want to be able to interact with their data to gain greater insight through sorting, grouping, graphing, charting, or otherwise manipulating the information. This directly impacts customer satisfaction and loyalty – the better companies are at giving customers ubiquitous access to that information, the more opportunities they have to delight and retain their customers. According to IDG’s 2015 “State of the CIO” report, customer experience technologies and mobile technologies are among CIOs’ top five priorities. The ability to access and interact with transactional data from any device falls squarely into both of these categories, so it’s no surprise organizations want to do so. The chart below demonstrates the level of importance CIOs have placed on providing customers the ability to interact with their information. However, while the understanding of the importance of this need is there, it doesn’t necessarily align with organizations’ ability to deliver. Some interesting facts uncovered through IDG’s August 2015 survey on customer data interactivity: 17 percent of organizations cannot provide access to that data across multiple devices. Two-thirds let customers access transactional data on any device, but only in a static format. Only 18 percent can give customers truly interactive transactional data via the device of their choice. The question then is, why is it so difficult for companies to provide information in interactive formats? The IDG survey reveals that many companies lack not only a strategy to enable interactivity, but the skilled resources to implement any strategy they might develop. Any attempts at cross-device interactivity are ad hoc and therefore difficult, where customers expect to be able to slice and dice their own transaction histories at will, allowing them to do so from their devices of choice. What can companies do about this? Where should they begin? What are the best practices in achieving the goal of interactivity in this information-driven age? To enable a better way to work in this age of disruption, OpenText recommends that IT leaders place priority on these three principles: Simplify access to data to reduce costs, improve efficiencies, and increase competitiveness. Consolidate and upgrade information and process platforms. Increase the speed of information delivery through integrated systems and visual presentation. Simplifying access to data is a key component of this puzzle. For very large organizations, data exists in different formats in different archives across disparate departments. This can become a huge barrier to getting information in a consolidated fashion, in the appropriate formats. Some of this data needs to be extracted in its native format, and other data can be repurposed from archived statements and reports. The data can exist in legacy and newer formats, and transforming this information into a common format acceptable to any device requires organization. Finally, accelerating the delivery of information in a device-agnostic manner can only be accomplished through integrated systems that can talk to each other and deliver data in visually compelling formats. All this requires an integrated look at the enterprise architecture and information flow. While this is very much achievable, it needs to be done in a systematic manner, with solutions that can address all the requirements as well as barriers in opening and freeing up information flow across the organization. OpenText, with its suite of products in the Output Transformation and Enterprise Content Management areas, has the toolkit to address different parts of this challenge with industry leading, best-in-class solutions. Download the IDG report,”Customers are demanding insights from their data. Are you ready?” to learn more about these principles of success, and how OpenText can help you deliver the interactive, digital experiences that the customer of today is demanding.

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Accessibility in Telecom: Thriving in a Customer-Centric World

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) rules under Section 255 of the Communications Act require telecommunications equipment manufacturers and service providers to make their products and services accessible to people with disabilities if such access is readily achievable. While this regulation has been around since 1996, telecom companies and device manufacturers are now starting to view accessibility as a competitive advantage vs. just a regulation that needs to be met. Take the example of Samsung, a telecommunications equipment manufacturer that has decided to place a greater strategic focus on creating an inclusionary environment for individuals with disabilities. The video below, “Hearing Hands,” from earlier this year is more than just a touching advertisement – it is an example of the proactive measures being taken in this industry to create superior and inclusive customer experiences as the next opportunity for retention and growth. As per a recent report on 2015 Telecommunications Trends by Strategy& (formerly Booz & Company) “Wired and wireless carriers confront a rapidly shifting technology landscape in which small steps toward digitization are no longer enough.” I would add to this by saying that digitization is also not going to be enough unless customers of all abilities are taken into account and included. With customer retention being a key challenge faced by telecoms and baby boomers retiring and aging, providing accessible services will be an important opportunity for telecoms to boost loyalty and overcome market challenges such as rate wars, the rise of the social customer and the constant inflow of new players in the market. There are many types of disabilities for which accessibility is implemented in different ways, and I’ll focus on accessibility for individuals with visual impairments in this blog post. Visually impaired individuals are very much a digital population. They have several types of assistive technologies at their disposal, such as desktop and mobile screen readers on Windows, Apple, Android, iOS and other operating systems to help them gain access to content. In fact, a recent 2014 study from Web AIM Screen Reader User Survey indicates that visually impaired individuals use advanced technology available to the sighted population, with the use of mobile on the rise from 61 percent in 2012 to 72 percent in 2014. With baby boomers aging and retiring, the demand for these technologies and information in formats compatible with them is growing, along with the expectation for a comparable user experience as provided to sighted users. No longer are these individuals willing to go through long-winded request processes for alternative formats – they want on-demand and real-time access to their information in digitally accessible formats, just as anyone else would. Telecommunication companies currently address requests for accessible monthly statements and communications for visually impaired individuals by providing these documents in braille, large print or audio formats. Requesting alternative formats is a laborious process in itself, and converting the documents is both expensive and time-consuming due to the manual effort involved. This approach requires individuals with visual impairments to self-identify, which defeats the very purpose of regulations like Section 255 that aim to create an inclusionary environment for people of all abilities. The OpenText Solution OpenText has an automated solution that enables organizations such as large telecommunications companies to automatically generate accessible PDF statements without requiring customers to self-identify. The solution can take existing high-volume documents such as statements stored in archives, or even bolt on to composition systems that generate statements and transform them to WCAG 2.0 Level AA compliant PDFs quickly and easily. This approach is fast, inexpensive and dramatically reduces the effort required in providing accessible formats to customers. Today over 20.6 million Americans over the age of 18 are reporting vision loss, and that number is growing. Prevent Blindness America estimates that the population of people experiencing blindness and visual impairment will double by 2030 unless corrective actions are taken. The traditional customer profile is changing, and so must organizations that wish to thrive in a customer-centric world. Learn more about the OpenText Automated Output Accessibility solution. Featured image courtesy of Joseph Morris.

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Accessibility Deadlines Loom for Airline Industry

Air travel has become one of the most digitized forms of transportation. Most people check airline fares and book airline reservations online, provide personal preferences for seating, meals, etc. online, and finalize their travel at kiosks at the airport. So, it is no surprise that the Department of Transport in the United States would make amendments to their legislation mandating the same level of digital service and access for Individuals with disabilities. The Department of Transportation (DOT) amended the Air Carrier Access Act (ACAA) on November 12, 2013 to include web and kiosk accessibility for individuals with disabilities. The amendments take effect starting December 2015, and impact both domestic and international airlines with flights in and out of the United States. Under the new deadlines, websites must meet WCAG 2.0 Level AA compliance standards by December 12, 2015 for 7 core functions performed by passengers online, including: Booking or changing a reservation (including all flight amenities) Checking in for a flight Accessing a personal travel itinerary Accessing the status of a flight Accessing a personal frequent flyer account Accessing flight schedules Accessing carrier contact information Meeting these requirements will be considered phase 1 compliance to the legislation. Phase 2 compliance covers all other content and tasks on the airlines’ websites, including any documents that are available as online content. The compliance deadline for the entire website is December 12, 2016, almost exactly a year from now. Domestic and foreign airlines exceeding 10,000 passengers must also ensure accessibility of all kiosks installed after December 12, 2016, and 25 percent of kiosks in each location must meet the specified accessibility standards by December 12, 2021. These amendments also apply to ticket agents who are not small businesses e.g. kayak.com, cheaptickets.com, orbitz.com, etc. Why is this legislation important? In the U.S. alone, there are more than 21 million adults with visual impairments. These individuals access digital content on their assistive technology such as screen readers and apps available on their mobile phones. An inaccessible website means restrictions to their abilities to book, modify or access travel information online. They are left with a much slower and more expensive alternative such as calling into a customer service desk to book travel. In this day of 24×7, instantaneous access to information, this growing population segment- expected to double in the next 35 years- with significant disposable income would be left behind if not for this legislation. Airlines would be under risk for litigation and also lose the opportunity to retain their customer base. In a highly competitive industry, it wouldn’t take much for customers to switch to another airline that offers appropriate accessibility facilities. OpenText has been the pioneer in developing and providing an automated solution for making online electronic documents (PDFs) accessible. This solution generates WCAG 2.0 Level AA compliant output that has been tested and validated by prominent organizations and advocacy groups for visually impaired individuals. OpenText has successfully implemented this solution for government agencies and associated organizations, as well as large commercial organizations, giving them the experience and expertise required to deliver accessible documents within a short time-frame, with minimal disruption to day-to-day business. Contact us today to learn more about how OpenText can help you achieve your accessibility goals and full compliance for documents by the required Department of Transportation ACAA deadline of December 2016.    

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Accessibility in a Digital-First World

With the term “accessibility”, the first thing that usually comes to mind is physical accessibility e.g. accessible washrooms, wheelchair ramps, accessible road crossings, etc. This perspective completely ignores another realm that most people exist in, i.e. the digital world. Today it is extremely common for individuals to spend 11+ hours a day on their electronic devices such as mobile phones, tablets and computers, so we simply cannot afford to ignore accessibility in the context of the digital interactions. Digital accessibility encompasses a variety of virtual interactions, including those made on websites, on personal electronic devices as well as via digital or electronic communications and documents. Taking a closer look at the numbers, we quickly realize that the population of individuals requiring accessible communications is quite large. More than 285 million individuals across the world have some form of visual impairment – that’s nearly 5% of the global population. This number is not static either; it is rapidly growing, with people living longer lives, and thereby increasing the population of aging individuals. In the United States alone, there are over 21 million adults reporting some form of vision loss, out of which over 6 million are completely blind and 2.5 million require large print to be able to read. Governments around the world have recognized accessibility as a global issue and have acted on the need to mandate accessible communications in an increasingly digital-first world. This is not about limiting accessible communications to traditional formats such as braille, large print and spoken word audio that are time consuming and expensive to produce, but about making all forms of communications accessible on-demand, in digital or electronic formats, without the need to self-identify. Governments have addressed the information accessibility issue through legislation that applies to both the public and commercial sectors, for example, Section 508 and the Americans with Disabilities Act in the United States, often going to the extent of being industry-specific, such as Section 255 of the Telecommunications Act. While some of the legislation is brand new, others are amendments to existing regulations to include accessibility in the context of digital or electronic communications via e.g. websites, online documents, etc. Many organizations around the world have begun working towards compliance to their country’s respective laws and making their websites, electronic communications such as PDF invoices, statements, notifications, tax forms, etc. available in formats that can be meaningfully navigated and read by screen reader technology on computers and mobile devices. What is your organization doing to meet this legal requirement and create an inclusionary environment for its customers? Join us on Thursday, November 12 for a special educational session on providing equal and timely access to information by implementing digital accessibility. “ALX-112 Reaching All Data Consumers – the State of Output Accessibility” will include an overview of accessibility drivers, the end-user perspective on accessible communications, what creating accessible content entails as well as a demonstration on how automation can result in dramatic time and cost savings in creating accessible content. Learn what you can do to help your organization comply with legislation, expand their business footprint to a growing but previously ignored segment of the population and retain loyalty from their existing, aging customer base.

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Is Your Organization Ready for the Future?

Is your organization ready for the future? Meeting Customer Demand for Interactivity and Flexibility Consumer technology is changing at a rapid pace, and so are consumer expectations. As the lines between business customers and consumers blur, we can see the speed of this consumer technology evolution is impacting the expectations of corporate customers or business users. Business customers are therefore demanding higher interactivity and flexibility from their technology as well as from the information they receive and view on this technology. It is no secret that business technology has been slow to catch up. An example of slowly evolving technology can be seen in the banking or financial services sector, where legacy core banking solutions, bolt-on channel solutions, monthly statements, etc. are still as pervasive as 10 years ago. However even banks are now starting to realize that sending monthly statements is like taking 5 seconds in a 2-second world. So what happens when fast-changing consumer technology meets slower-to-evolve business technology? It creates a gap. A gap that if not addressed sooner rather than later, can cause even the largest organization to lose its stronghold on the market. A Peek into the Near Future As per recent data from Accenture, there will be: 25 billion devices expected by 2020 9 billion people accessing information through 4G-LTE networks by 2018 4 billion app users by 2017 9 Exabytes of mobile data being generated per month by 2018 This represents a huge number of devices, networks and information that organizations will need to be able to manage and utilize to show business value to their customers. To harness this information, enterprises will need the ability to access new and legacy sources of data, concurrently and in real-time. They’ll also need to be able to aggregate data acquired from these disparate sources and deliver the data while providing a superior digital experience to their consumers to keep them engaged and interested. Organizations will also need to create insight from all of this data to improve customer relationships and foster loyalty to initiate a cycle of continuous business improvement and growth. Adapt or Die! As per a recent poll conducted by OpenText, 77% of respondents rated their organization’s preparedness for entering a digital-first world as being between 2.5 out of 5. “Digital Disruption to displace 4 in 10 industry incumbents within the next 5 years.” according to a new report released last month by the Global Center for Digital Business Transformation (DBT Center). Customers expect much more out of their digital experiences, and the organizations that deliver will survive, and others will perish. Although organizational preparedness is at a low level, another survey by Deloitte indicates that 75% of executives indicate that their companies are exploring or adopting some form of Internet of Things (IoT) solution and believe that integrating this into their main business is necessary to remain competitive. Now is the time to get ready and look at what the requirements are to prepare for this digital enterprise. We are entering the digital age and information is becoming the currency of the digital economy.  No longer is it the size, scale, access to resources or geographic presence that drive the competitive advantage of an enterprise. It is the degree to which it can take advantage of information to innovate and grow. Information is the currency of this new world, and the degree to which organizations can take advantage of the information to innovate, grow and engage with customers, is what will determine who survives in this new world. OpenText’s mandate is to enable the digital world for its customers. To achieve this in an age of disruption, OpenText places priority on these three guiding principles: Simplify – Reduce costs, improve efficiencies and increase competitiveness Transform – Consolidate and upgrade information and process platforms Accelerate – Increase the speed of information delivery through integrated systems and visual presentation Learn more about how OpenText can help you unlock your digital potential – view our latest webinar on the subject or visit www.OpenText.com.

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Achieving Equal Access in Health Care Information

As per a report published by the Equal Rights Center in 2011, blind and visually impaired individuals routinely face barriers in receiving information regarding their health care including documents such as test results, prescriptions, etc., benefits information such as Explanation of Benefits, eligibility and termination information and e-delivered communications such as billing statements, summary of benefits and more in accessible formats. This includes information received by visually impaired Americans being covered by Medicare and Medicaid. These individuals are often presented with work-around solutions, such as relying on friends, family or healthcare practitioners to read their private medical information to them. Not only is this a breach of the individual’s privacy, but also leads to outcomes that could result in poor health and loss of benefits. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS), an agency of the US Department of Health and Human Services, is the largest single payer for health care in the United States. As per data from the CMS: 90 Million Americans receive healthcare coverage through Medicare, Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program. Approximately 4.3 million individuals over the age of 65 report some form of visual impairment. There are also approximately 700,000 Medicare beneficiaries between the ages of 21 and 64 who have some form of visual impairment. Private healthcare insurers have been contracted by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to offer Medicare and Medicaid programs, and these insurance providers must meet federal regulation i.e. Section 508, requiring that they ensure access to and use of their websites and digital documentation to people with disabilities, including the blind or visually impaired individuals. Non-compliance could lead to penalties and the loss of lucrative contracts for insurers. It is therefore no surprise that document (e.g. PDF) accessibility is a hot-button issue for government and even private healthcare insurers contracted by the CMS. As “public accommodations” under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), healthcare insurers are generally well aware of their legal responsibility to customers with disabilities such as visual impairment, and are quite used to complying with these regulations. But now that accessibility requirements are expanding into cyberspace, healthcare insurers need to find appropriate technology solutions for this new challenge. Until a couple of years ago, it simply had not been possible for healthcare insurers to create high-volume, communications and documents in accessible PDF format. The sheer scale of production, with documents numbering in the thousands or millions, precludes manual remediation because of several limiting factors: Costs of manually remediating documents Delivery time due to the laborious nature of manual remediation Stringent accessibility tagging requirements OpenText has created an automated, software-based solution to address these very limitations. The OpenText Automated Output Accessibility solution can generate accessible PDFs from any high-volume, system-generated input print stream or other formats quickly and efficiently, while keeping storage size at bay. The solution was designed using thousands of man-hours worth of very specific experience and expertise in the system-generated document accessibility space, and our industry-leading transformation engine enables generating accessible output in the milliseconds. In fact, the output generated from this solution has been reviewed by the National Federation of the Blind and other prominent organizations for the visually impaired. Learn more about the OpenText Automated Output Accessibility solution at http://ccm.actuate.com/solutions/document-accessibility.

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Upcoming Accessibility Deadlines for Federal Student Loan Statement Servicers

Section 508 and WCAG compliance has been an important mandate for the U.S. Federal Government, and the Department of Education is one of the government agencies actively working towards meeting these requirements for visually impaired students receiving federal loans. The Department of Education has now issued time frames and deadlines for WCAG compliance to student loan servicers that generate and distribute federal Direct Loan Program (DLP) statements, notices and communications. Accordingly, all loan statements, notices and communications, forms and websites need to be made available to borrowers in accessible read-only HTML format or non-proprietary equivalent (e.g. accessible PDF), complying with Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act and WCAG 2.0, within a few short months. The Federal Government has also established additional time frames for testing and verification of accessibility compliance before the actual deadline, for making accessible content available to borrowers. Loan service providers typically generate statements, notices and communications in print stream or PDF formats. Making these accessible using traditional methods is manual, laborious, time-consuming and expensive. Visually impaired students therefore typically experience a lag in receiving critical information included in their statements, notices and communications in formats they can access due to the time lines and delays involved in generating manually tagged accessible PDFs, Braille, Large Print, Audio or HTML formats. This is far from ideal, and visually impaired students are now expecting to be treated the same as anyone else would be with regards to the timely availability of important information. Most Federal Student Loan Statement Servicers are still struggling to find a solution that meets compliance and can be made operational before the required deadlines. While building a new solution from scratch is often how IT departments approach technology challenges, given the tight timelines involved and the level of accuracy, expertise, testing capabilities and technological know-how required in building a solution, it is not an efficient way of addressing this particular requirement. Key points for Federal Loan Service Providers to consider when implementing an automated accessibility solution: The solution should be easy to implement and should not require management of multiple formats Storage costs should not increase as a result of the solution The solution should be infinitely scalable and be able to support the demands of generating millions of documents without performance issues The OpenText Automated Output Accessibility solution addresses each of these requirements, and can generate accessible PDFs from any input print stream format quickly and efficiently, while keeping storage size at bay. The solution was designed using thousands of man-hours worth of very specific experience and expertise in the system-generated document accessibility space, and our industry-leading transformation engine enables generating accessible output in the milliseconds. In fact, the output generated from this solution has been reviewed by the National Federation of the Blind as well as the Department of Education. Using best-of-breed technology and accessibility-specific expertise is the only fool-proof way of meeting the tight time frames and deadlines defined by the Department of Education. Learn more about our solution here.

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Replacing Your Legacy Archiving System is a Pain. No More!

Large organizations rely heavily on rapidly evolving technology to thrive in today’s competitive business environment. And one of these vital solutions is the electronic archiving system, which is expected to maintain a comprehensive and accurate record of customer information such as statements, bills, invoices, insurance policies, scanned images and other organizational information that is essential to the survival and growth of the enterprise. It is critically important for modern organizations that these assets are retained in an efficient and intelligent manner so that they can be retrieved on-demand for customer presentation, compliance, auditing, reporting, etc. Like all information technology, archive systems too need to be upgraded from time to time. Depending on the requirements of a progressive organization, this could even mean replacing the existing systems with a brand new solution. The first step toward an effective solution, however, is identifying the shortcomings of the current system in the context of your evolving business needs. Here are a few tell-tale signs that your archiving system hasn’t been keeping up with your growth: Waning vendor support – It doesn’t receive enough attention from the vendor in terms of upgrades and support. Costly Upgrades – When it becomes prohibitively expensive to boost performance or add new capabilities/features. New Media Deficit – The system falls short on receiving and serving up content to the multitude of customer channels, including web, social, mobile, tablet, text, messages, email, and print. Social Disconnect – Perhaps the most easily recognizable symptom of an outdated archive system is the inability to connect with social media such as Facebook and Twitter accounts and capture and store customer information. Content Inaccessibility – Users complaining of an inability to extract data for targeted messaging, trans-promotional marketing, analytics, and other sales and marketing functions. Compliance Infractions – Inability to store or retrieve content that could lead to investigations, fines, license revocations, or lawsuits. If you can relate to one or more of these issues then upgrading to a more contemporary solution may be the best way forward. An example of archive migrations we have conducted for our customers and have extensive experience in is for the Mobius/ASG-ViewDirect® system. The challenges often highlighted for this system include some of those listed in the points above, as well as other issues typically seen in legacy archive systems, such as a lack of a coherent product roadmap, high costs, and an outdated user experience. Customers are often certain about the need for migration but are unsure about how to move to a new archive without disrupting critical business functions. The only real roadblock to improved performance then, is the migration itself. The process can be laborious and cumbersome, with key performance factors around the ability to perform complex document migrations on time and within budget, while maintaining access for existing applications, repurposing information locked in legacy document formats and meeting regulatory requirements. While enterprise IT departments have stringent migration requirements, modernizing your archiving system doesn’t necessarily have to be painful, and OpenText®’s ECM Migration service has a methodology in place to make sure it isn’t. The service provides a way to efficiently migrate content out of legacy archiving systems like Mobius/ASG-ViewDirect® and others to a more contemporary solution such as OpenText’s Output Archive (formerly known as BIRT Repository). Some of the unique benefits of using OpenText’s ECM Migration Service for Mobius migrations include the ability to migrate content out of Mobius without the need to purchase expensive Mobius APIs and the capability to read directly from the underlying file structure using the Mobius Resource Extractor, bypassing the need for Mobius to be running. Our ECM Migration methodology has been designed keeping best practices gleaned from many successful engagements and utilizes award-winning technologies to automate migration in a lights-out environment without disrupting day-to-day business activities. The ECM Migration team has worked with many ECM systems including IBM® Content Management OnDemand (CMOD), IBM® FileNet® Image Services, IBM®FileNet® P8, ASG-ViewDirect®, and others for decades, and the maturity of our solution proves it. Our technology and DETAIL™ Methodology enables us to: Manage all aspects of a migration Cut up to 6 weeks off of the initial planning Use standard logging on a single platform Provide multi-threaded support out-of-the-box Implement process flows, advanced logic and routers through drag-and-drop interfaces without the need for scripting Connect to and pool the connection with multiple databases and repositories Run processes concurrently, by thread or broken down by stage (i.e. Load, Extract, Convert) Handle massive volumes of data, documents, images and metadata So, if you think it’s time to say goodbye to your current archiving system, know that there are experts out there who can help you define your requirements and deploy an appropriate solution that will take you where you want to go. And remember – organizations that evolve, thrive. Others perish.

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