Liz Kofsky

Liz Kofsky
Liz Kofsky is a Director of Product Marketing for the ECM team at OpenText. Liz is passionate about engaging with customers as they succeed in their ECM journeys.

Enterprise World 2016: How to Succeed with ECM

ECM

Having attended more iterations of Enterprise World than most, I know from personal experience that every edition of our flagship annual event is a world unto itself; every one has its own unique feel and personality. This year promises to be no different. For the first time I can recall, the OpenText community will be convening right on the heels of a major product release. Back in April, we launched Release 16, the most extensive product announcement in our history. That makes this Enterprise World something special; the perfect forum for customers, partners, and thought leaders to come together and experience a brand new, revolutionary product suite in person. You’ll have a front-row seat to discovering what it can do, how it all fits together, and what it all means to your organization. The focus at Enterprise World this year is squarely on learning: Learning how to maximize your existing infrastructure, learning what’s available to up your game, and learning which trends are going to impact your future. We’re turning the floor over to the product gurus, the solution experts, and the industry thought leaders to teach and educate. If you happened to read CEO Mark Barrenechea’s recent post, you’ll see some interesting numbers; this year we’re scheduling double the number of breakouts, and almost double the number of technical training sessions. From a Content Suite standpoint, that means: How To’s A wide variety of technically-focused “How To” and training sessions covering everything related to Content Suite and ECM, from maintaining to optimizing to upgrading. Honestly, there are so many topics covered, if you’re a practitioner or administrator, you just have to dive in and peruse through. Product Updates What’s new? A lot. And there’s an abundance of sessions devoted to the nuts and bolts that make up the advances in our new and existing solutions. These are the overviews where you’ll get clear, tangible insight on new features and functionality, new integration capabilities, and new use cases. Keynotes Always a strong point at Enterprise World and even more so this year. Again, it’s all about learning, so look for a first-rate assortment of OpenText and industry thought leaders to help you do your job better, increase your understanding of the rapidly evolving information management landscape, and the role our new solutions can play in maximizing your digital enterprise. Connecting My personal favorite activity at every Enterprise World! And we’re making sure there are even more settings to have the conversations that matter to you — answering your questions and expanding your horizons. From interactive customer panels featuring organizations tackling the same challenges and opportunities as you to hands-on demonstrations of Content Suite’s new features at the Content Theater, the experts are all here for you. Let’s talk. Nashville in July…School’s in Where will I be? Hopefully everywhere, but here’s the shortlist of ECM sessions I’m counting on to inspire both my left and right brains: ECM-100 ECM Strategy and Product Direction: Re-Thinking ECM for the Digital Enterprise ECM-201 Product Update: Smart UI – Content Suite User Interface ECM-301 How To: Extended ECM Platform Developer Workshop ECM-212 How To: Insights from the In-House Upgrade to Content Server 16 at OpenText Enterprise World 2016 is shaping up to be an epicenter in re-thinking ECM and its role in digital transformation. The next-gen solutions, the best practices, and the thought leadership will all be there. Now all we need is you. Take a few minutes to read about the new possibilities for ECM in the digital enterprise and plan on learning more—much more—in Nashville. See you there!

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AIIM Research Findings on Information Governance

These days, it seems data leaks and security breaches are in the news almost constantly. It’s not a good problem, but the silver lining may be that it’s made organizations rethink their Information Governance strategies. The new Industry Watch report from AIIM Market Intelligence, Automating Information Governance, sheds new light on industry trends around the shifting Information Governance challenges. As Doug Miles, head of the AIIM Market Intelligence division, puts it: “The rules and risks have changed. We now need to keep all electronically stored information securely, compliantly, and available to the legal process, whether it’s work-in-progress documents, emails, collaboration tools, or any other repository of content.” I can’t wait to discuss AIIM’s findings with Doug during the upcoming webinar, Automating Information Governance: AIIM Research Findings and Industry Trends, on June 10. The landscape is changing quickly and organizations that don’t rethink their Information Governance strategies soon risk being left behind. Get the full AIIM Industry Watch report here. And see a preview of their findings in this video from Doug Miles:

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How ECM Pays for Itself: What Customers (Not Vendors) are Saying [White Paper]

Listen to any Enterprise Content Management (ECM) vendor and they’ll tell you at least ten ways that their software and services will not only save you money, but actually generate it. Traditionally, addressing the core challenges of providing a way to organize, manage, and store documents and other content related to an organization’s processes was treated as a cost of doing business—a necessary evil, like wearing that horrible sweater your aunt bought you to family dinners… Over time, organizations discovered that ECM does much more than just help control the massive amount of information generated by business. It provides concrete value to the business. In a CMSWire article earlier this month, David Roe outlined the findings of a recent Nucleus Research report, including where leading vendors are taking ECM: They’re combining the rising need to manage new forms of content, providing better mobile access, facilitating more engaging content collaboration, and improving overall user experience. It’s an interesting read on vendor strategies to address the rapid change in the content management market. But what are customers saying? How are they justifying purchases? What are the key areas of return on investment, and how substantial is the ROI for ECM? OpenText recently commissioned a survey and research across customers of different sizes and representing a range of industries to answer these questions. The resulting white paper gives an in-depth look at the research findings and, through real-world case studies and summary charts and tables of the survey, gives a snapshot view to learn how leading ECM practitioners are getting ECM to pull its weight. In the survey, customers reported that ROI comes from a lot of different places, but the Top 5 value drivers of content management, across both business and technology departments, were: Increased user productivity via transparent records management for end-users: Making typically convoluted tasks invisible to users makes work lives easier for them while ensuring application of required RM policies. Ease of placing legal holds: For litigation, investigations and audits, the burden, time, and cost of putting holds on content is substantially reduced. Reduced archiving costs: Dispositioning of content once it has met its retention schedule results in significant cost savings and even more importantly reduced risk. Compliance: Improved compliance for regulatory mandates and internal policies keeps both the legal/compliance office happy and avoids fines and financial sanctions. Archiving: Storage of only what is of business value to the organization helps drive down costs while ensuring that intellectual property tucked away in content doesn’t escape and is instantly accessible. Visit the ROI of ECM center to download your copy of Is ECM Just a Cost of Doing Business? Why Leading Organizations Say “No” and see what else the survey uncovered as well as read some snapshot case studies on where the ROI of ECM may be found in your own company.

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RM: Information Governance Superhero-in-Waiting

Ahhh, good ol’ Records Management.If, like me, you’ve been working in large corporate environments for 10years or more, just saying the phrase undoubtedly conjures up theclassic records management stereotypes you picked up in your early days:Windowless basements stacked with banker’s boxes and rows of filingcabinets. Obsessive crews of process-oriented quasi-librariansmeticulously assigning a file number to “official” corporate documentsthat may never be needed again. Yes, it was all necessary, but it wasalso all seen as somewhat inconsequential and certainly not as a keybusiness driver. DILBERT © 2004 Scott Adams. Used by permission of Universal Uclick. All rights reserved. Well,guess what, folks. Turns out there was something to all thatdetail-driven classification, retention scheduling and archiving. Theregulatory and legal climate of the business world has changeddrastically: The systematic management of corporate records has become acore element of compliant, defensible Enterprise Content Management (ECM). Accordingly, the practice of records management has evolved frommarginalized afterthought to essential survival tool: An organization’svery existence can hinge on its ability to provide timely, accurateresponses to compliance, regulatory or discovery obligations. Talk aboutgoing from zero to hero in the span of a decade! Yet it still amazes me that the generations of thought-leadership, technology and best-practices development that have gone into managing thelifecycle of official corporate records is often not being applied tothe vast volumes of additional unstructured data organizations nowpossess. Think about it: It’s the aforementioned traditional businessrecords that have historically been most likely to be targeted incompliance and discovery reporting. It only makes sense to expand the time-tested, rigorous principles applied tothe most scrutinized corner of the business to the enterprise as awhole. Theconcept of information archiving is a perfect example. Organizationshave become extremely proficient at generating and collectinginformation. From emails to marketing collateral to financial statementsand beyond, it’s growing at staggering rates. But what are manyorganizations doing with it once it’s served its purpose? In the absenceof having a thorough information governance program, they’ve defaultedto dumping it en masse into an archive. Now, they can compress,de-duplicate and encrypt to their heart’s content but, in very shortorder, they’re going to want to cost-effectively access and retrievepieces of that information in its original context–something that’s nextto impossible unless well-planned information governance policies werein place beforehand. Chancesare the optimal solution could already be roaming your hallways. Bybringing your records manager and their knowledge base into the loop andhaving them collaborate with IT, legal, and compliance on acomprehensive information governance program, your organization canextend pre-existing best practices to all its enterprise information anddefine classification, retention, preservation, and dispositionparameters in an easily accessible, defensible structure. Optimal InfoGov Adds Value Across an Enterprise EnterpriseArchiving is just one of the areas where this cross-functionalcollaboration can be hugely beneficial to an organization. In the modernbusiness environment, compliance and legal requirements obviously play ahuge role, but effective information management also adds significantvalue to product development, process improvement, disaster recovery andmore. To achieve this, every email, every R&D report, everyaccounting ledger, every HR comment, every piece of unstructured contentneeds to be subject to the same fastidious processes as the most formalorganizational business record. If you’re a CIO, information architect, or IT strategist, a great first step to developing a comprehensive Enterprise Information Management (EIM) strategy is thoroughly familiarizing yourself with the practice of records management and the principles behind it.Yes, you may have barely noticed records management specialists at thecompany Holiday party all those years ago, but times have changed. Greatthings are waiting for those who think outside the (banker’s) box.

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Implementing an IG Program – Where to Begin?

Implementing an Information Program – Where to Begin? I am not sure if this has anything to do with the latest heat wave in Ottawa, Canada – yes, we are experiencing summer-like weather in March. Trust me, I am not complaining, but spring is in the air and it seems like it’s making everyone wake up to a very important topic: where to begin with information governance? I have received a flurry of inquiries over the past week, all with a common theme – where should our organization start?Something that is critical, and reiterated by many, is to ensure an information governance program lies with the Chief Information Officer and Chief Legal Officer, while involving records management and the key stakeholders from different business units. It is a team approach and not something that can be successful if only driven by one team.As opposed to writing an extensive blog post on all the key considerations, I have decided to talk about just one: start with the riskiest content. One important element is to look at your riskiest content first as it’s not always possible to conquer all requirements at once. There is nothing wrong with a phased approach; proving success in small increments can prove to be a good approach. One of the riskiest content pieces is email. Why?Simply because no one ever gets rid of it or if they do, it’s done on a whim with no consideration to its content. This type of activity can translate into an enormous exposure to risk due to the likelihood of smoking guns and spoliation. So, can email be managed?Absolutley.I strongly encourage flexibility, specifically when it comes to classifying email – one approach will not fit all.There will be some users that want the ability to drag and drop; others will want to choose their classification from picklists or favourites, while others will want the system to automatically classify emails.All methods are encouraged as you want to make sure you provide a system the end-user will use. As an example, take a look; well actually have a listen to how NuStar Energy addressed its email management challenges. NuStar Energy L.P. is a publicly traded, limited partnership based in San Antonio, with 8,417 miles of pipeline; 89 terminal and storage facilities that store and distribute crude oil, refined products and specialty liquids; and two asphalt refineries and a fuels refinery with a combined throughput capacity of 118,500 barrels per day. With operations in the United States, Canada, Mexico, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and Turkey, the company uses OpenText Email Management for Microsoft Exchange to help reduce the cost and risk of mismanaged corporate email. “Having all email in one location, being able to search in one place and put a legal hold in one location instead of potentially seven or eight, is huge for us on the legal end. It’s all managed by OpenText.”— Clint Wentworth, Records and Information Manager, NuStar Energy. There has been a lot of traction around the topic of auto classification. A very important element is to make sure the offering is defensible at the same time as being transparent. Defensible so that the organization can state to the courts and auditors the processes taking place to test, tweak and monitor the way the information is being classified.Transparent so there is no disruption to the way our businesses work. Yes, there is at lot to consider when starting to implement an information governance program.A solid strategy, involvement from key stakeholders and addressing your riskiest content first is a sound way to begin!

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Governance: It Doesn’t Matter What, It Really Matters Who

As I just got back fromLegalTech NY, where I spent many hours speaking with General Counsels and IT Directors about their business requirements, I wanted to share and repost a blog, which is relevant to those discussions. The following is a guest post by Dave Martin Originally posted on Dave Martin’sblog on SharePointProMagazine. Read the other posts in this series here. Over the years one of the many things I’ve been involved with is governance.To most the word governance is synonymous with compliance, which is then in turn synonymous with records management.After that the focus becomes very specific.What I recommend people do when trying to understand how they should approach governance is to approach it as a strategy and make sure that strategy involves and intertwines three things: people, process and technology. If this sounds familiar it was an integral part the first post I wrote in this series around understanding SharePoint from a big picture perspective.When it comes to governance specifically there is a certain part of this triumvirate that stands out: the people.We often run headstrong into governance deployments without really understanding who needs to be involved before the code hits the servers and processes are under way. The very first step organizations need to take is defining that small group, who will steer the solution to and through implementation.Obviously IT pops up first as we look to define this working group, and they are unquestionably a very big part as they will be responsible for the technology doing what it needs to do.Another group that should also be considered a bit of a no-brainer is the group or department, or in many cases, the individual responsible for records.This person may be by title the compliance officer, records manager, IT security or legal counsel, regardless they are responsible for the information policy management of the organization.And lastly, but certainly not least we must include someone, or some group that represents the line of business worker, or end-user. Surprisingly, I have seen this last group consistently excluded from the planning process.Not because they are a problem or difficult to work with, but because the people that are actually going to use the solution are often an afterthought, or as IT would consider them: the customer.DO NOT forget to include this group!At the end of the day they will literally make or break the deployment’s success causing problems for both those other groups at the table as they won’t understand the technology (frustrating IT) or they don’t execute according to policy (putting the company at risk). Once we have the right contributors at the table we can start to define the governance strategy.When people are defining their governance strategy I always promote that they ask themselves a few key questions to help better understand what they want to do, who it will affect and what they need to do it.Once these questions have been answered a plan can be more easily defined. The first question is: do you understand your content?This is very important and can also be made as a statement: know your content!We have content broadly spread across our environment, not just in SharePoint.If we are planning to move large portions of that content into SharePoint – file share replacement is one of the top uses of SharePoint – think about what you are moving over.Is this relevant data? Is this data that must live under compliance?Is this duplicate data?Is this active data? This last question is an important one to consider in terms of SharePoint.SharePoint is an active content solution, and a relatively costly place to store content.If you are moving massive volumes of data into SharePoint it just does not make sense to move old, inactive content into SharePoint from a cost perspective.This content should move directly into an archive that lives on a lower and cheaper tier of storage. Once again we must consider “the who” for a second here.Even though we are moving content out of SharePoint and into a more cost effective compliant place we cannot forget that users should be able to access it or restore it (permissions pending) directly from SharePoint. My next question is: what are your specific compliance requirements?This varies widely from company to company and industry to industry – every company has corporate policies specific to their internal requirements, and many companies have to adhere to industry regulations.SharePoint does a great job of managing the content in SharePoint as records, but does an even better job when supported by partners.As broad as SharePoint’s records capabilities are when it comes to supporting industry regulations and government guidelines like the Department of Defense 5015.2 (DoD 5015.2), physical records and records living outside of SharePoint’s native repositories a third-party add-on solution is a requirement. And for my last question, we go back to “the who” again: How will we govern the people?Again, for most, information governance has to do with the information, but we must also be sure to govern the people if we are going to be successful.This question relates to how we are enabling people to leverage the core strengths of SharePoint, and this all starts with the creation of Sites and filling them with content.Organizations have to have a Site provisioning plan in place or they risk putting the organization as a whole at risk.Site sprawl is not just a myth, it is a reality, but it doesn’t have to be feared.Attaching a lifecycle and policies to a Site at the point of creation will ensure that Sites are connected to the data center and can be managed under the watchful eye of IT.Not only this, but we can now monitor those same sites and move them to the appropriate tier of storage once they have become dormant or inactive.Site provisioning allows organizations to permit the creation of as many or as few sites required all in a controlled fashion. As you can see, understanding “the who” when defining your governance strategy for SharePoint is a pretty big deal.Not to downplay the value of process or technology, but to use an analogy: it is the person that drives the car down the right road, and it really helps when that person knows where they’re going.Just like a good governance plan for SharePoint, people who drive cars will get to their destination faster if they have good maps. To find out more, join me on February 21st at noon EST where I’ll be participating in the webinar Extending SharePoint Across Your Information Infrastructure. You’ll learn key concepts required to turn SharePoint into a multifaceted, stable, and powerful IT tool set.

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