John Price

John Price
John is a product marketing manager primarily focused on Digital Asset Management. His background includes working with major media companies and founder of a company developing software for broadcast automation and media management. He sees today as the most exhilarating time to work in the DAM and marketing arenas. Managing digital assets is a critical part of a comprehensive digital transformation strategy. Forward-looking companies with a dynamic vision and strategy for digital media – inside and outside the firewall – are the companies of the future.

Digital Asset Management Underpins the Customer Journey

Digital Asset Management

This article on LinkedIn about the customer journey is excellent, because it’s not just the usual one-sided, “how to engage and attract more customers” spiel. It speaks to the entire Customer Lifetime Value and the importance of continuing to delight customers AFTER their purchase or acquisition, and therefore can become a win – win for everyone involved. Many of us think in pictures and images rather than words, and the exponential growth of digital media assets is a proof point of how you can delight and interact with your customers during all points in their customer journey. Organizations are now discovering the value of Enterprise digital asset management (DAM) to help them to truly “media-enable” their businesses. To do this requires a digital asset management Platform in order to integrate and share assets as well as metadata, with systems like product catalogs, customer support, training and loyalty programs. All of which can enhance the customer journey with your brand, and at any touch-point with any device. Digital asset management is required as a core technology for Customer Experience Management and the continuous customer journey. Read this article on LinkedIn to learn more. Also, download this white paper for more information on the customer journey in a digital world,  “A Better Way to Engage – Redefining the Customer Journey for a Digital World”.

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OpenText’s Innovative DAM Solution Wins Industry Accolade!

Digital Asset Management

OpenText™ Media Management wins the 2016 SIIA CODie Award for Best Digital Asset Management (DAM) Solution, continuing to build momentum in the industry. The Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA) CODiE Award is a prestigious honor for OpenText. Each award winner was reviewed by a field of industry experts, whose evaluations determined the finalists. SIIA members then reviewed the finalists and their votes were combined with the scores from the industry experts’ to select this year’s CODiE Awards winners. “SIIA’s 2016 Business Technology CODiE Award winners are some of the most innovative products impacting businesses across the world. Recognized by their peers, the CODiE Winners should be proud of this prestigious accolade honoring excellence in business technology products,” said Rhianna Collier, VP & Managing Director for the Software & Services Division at SIIA. “We congratulate all of this year’s CODiE Award winners, and thank them for the contributions they have made to their industries.” This recognition validates OpenText’s DAM efforts, especially with the innovations in our latest Media Management release. However, this award is really for our customers as none of this would have been possible without your valuable input and insights. OpenText Media Management is a recognized leader in the industry. Our latest release adds new capabilities to keep us at the forefront of the industry, including embedded analytics, adaptive media delivery services, Media Management Cloud Edition and usability. See the CODie Award Press Release.

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NAB Show 2016 – Not My First DAM Rodeo

OpenText at NAB

At NAB, the National Association of Broadcasters show in Las Vegas, Digital Asset Management (DAM), media and technology are finally catching up. I have been attending the NAB Show for nearly all of my working life – a long time! I have been working in the DAM industry for the last five years and it is gratifying to see the amount of interest in DAM at this show. Over the years, many media companies were looking for solutions to better manage media, but they were ahead of their time. The technology just hadn’t progressed to a point to make their vision a reality. Now the technology is catching up. Broadcast media has certainly evolved. Back in the day, it seemed innovation at NAB was about how many shiny new buttons were added to the cool box for the control room gallery or studio. Now all those buttons are part of a slick mouse-controlled interface that can do the same job that it used to take 25 people to do. Managing media assets and metadata, whether its called MAM, DAM or whatever, should be a no-brainer in the media industry. DAM sits at the intersection of making media and doing something with it. It is not just about broadcasting, and DAM is not just a library of media content. The biggest change for vendors in both broadcasting and DAM is in integration. The silos must die! The proprietary systems of the past have given way to interdependent ecosystems. In DAM this means going beyond integration with other systems and being able to adapt to the customer’s environment. Who wants to support an integration in which both ends have to code and test at every release to make sure the middle still works? Plus, there are so many pieces to fit together, multiple systems and dependencies that need to share information and work together. It is all part of an ecosystem which includes the processes to plan, produce, deliver, and measure digital media. Lots of pieces have to fit together and work together in complex environments, touching all parts of the organization and the wider digital media supply chain. What excites me about DAM (OpenText™ Media Management is the one I am most familiar with) is that it is moving to more of a configuration model, rather than heavy coding for integration and customization. It  allows loosely coupled integration with secure, controlled access to share and synchronize data. It allows customers to work the way they want to work. At OpenText we are starting to see this with the media companies we work with. We can media-enable the processes, such as project management, so you can track the people, budget and time as a project as all of the associated assets move through its lifecycle. We can consolidate the assets so there is a single container or place for all the metadata, relationships and versions – a single source of the truth, and we can securely manage and control access. Ultimately, this is about providing transparency and collaboration in media planning and creation, and leveraging metadata to provision the processes in how that media content is to be used.  Then providing the feedback with analytics and metrics in how it is actually used across all of the  different delivery vehicles to get your message and story to any audience, any device, any format, any time. I tell customers all the time that every company is a media company. And it’s a great time to be a media company.

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Digital Asset Management Innovation

I recently wrote an article on DAM innovation for CMS Wire, “Setting the Stage for DAM Innovation” highlighting that there are many player contributing to the foundation for innovation. Customers, users,vendors and service providers are involved and, with a lot of work, some great timing and serendipity – the next brilliant innovation in the industry is unveiled. Some in the DAM industry are worried there is an innovation slump, “What’s Holding DAM Back?”. I am happy to report that, yes, there is still a lot of innovation. If you look at what customers and service providers are doing, there are many new solutions and integrations, all demonstrating the creative minds and solutions-focused innovation that is happening. With the latest release of Media Management, customers are doing some amazing things. It is a harbinger of what is possible and what is to come. OpenText customers are extending the API framework and services, integrating ever more deeply in the organizations, automating processess for timely, targeted delivery and “freeing” the DAM to easily share and collaborate. Media Management continues to grow as well: Media Management Cloud Edition adds the benefits of hosted services in the OpenText Cloud with our own experts to manage and support your DAM. Our next release “deconstructs” DAM in the sense of discrete services that can be embedded in other applications and provide DAM functionality. This includes adaptive and responsive Delivery services to publish rich media content to multiple channels and devices, analytics and dashboards to view and understand asset usage, embeddable widgets” for searching and previewing content, and granular control to manage who can see what and when. All of this adds to making it easier for customers and our partners to integrate Media Management as a core enterprise service – cloud or on premise – to drive better customer experience, increase productivity and help organizations be more successful. Join us at OpenText Enterprise World November 8-13 at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas. Experience innovation at The Digital Experience Theater.

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NAB SHOWTIME

This year at NAB, OpenText is demonstrating an example of how integrated and interconnected technologies working together are able to support the Digital Media Supply Chain. OpenText Media Management is an enterprise Digital Asset Management, DAM, system that is an integral part of the core infrastructure for digital media in organizations whether video, publishing, branding, or global marketing campaigns. What is this “Digital Media Supply Chain”? For many of the largest companies it is a transformation from linear processes to a non-linear, dynamic, real-time delivery supply chain across multiple channels and outlets. Media companies have many projects across multiple production areas – video, graphics, photography – plus contributions from agencies, stock houses and contractors. Delivery is not just for a single channel, but an amalgamation of many delivery and consumption points, each with its own requirements. Media Management is interconnected with technologies from OpenText and others, managing digital media as it is created, stored and delivered. It supports the Digital Media Supply Chain from project initiation and production to delivery and analytics. Unlike traditional DAM systems, Media Management has engineered a platform allowing customers to connect people, processes, and content with a sophisticated yet simple HTML5 UI. Media Management supports enterprise-wide ecosystems and digital media supply chains for global delivery of rich media across multiple channels and platforms. What this means for our customers is a “media-enabled” infrastructure to streamline content and data flows throughout the organization. At NAB, our story demonstrates a complex ecosystem from media creation to consumption with Media Management providing a “single source of truth” and a consolidated asset repository for video, marketing, branding, commerce and global distribution. This sophisticated ecosystem has many interdependent and interrelated technologies. It is not just gluing the technologies together; it is orchestrating the flow of data, collaboration and synchronization, then automating the processes for streamlined input and output. Media Management has an open platform with REST APIs, and web services to integrate and even embed DAM functionality with the many different systems and technologies. This centralized repository for media content, with browser-based, user-friendly search and easy (yet secure) sharing helps eliminate all those multiple islands of unmanaged digital assets throughout an organization. Our story starts as an idea that gets a green light, initiating a new project. OpenText Process Suite orchestrates the people, resources, schedule and budget, triggering a flexible project structure in OTMM for all the content deliverables – such as video promos, DVD covers, one-sheets, web graphics, ecommerce, catalogs, artwork for merchandising, billboards, and cross-channel ad and social campaigns. These deliverables and their dependencies are produced in parallel using, reusing and repurposing content and designs for multiple channels and campaigns, allowing producers to select teams, assign and monitor tasks. It is connected to rights and talent contracts to provide detailed usage and contract information as the project progresses. Creative teams use their native tools integrated with Media Management for work-in-progress, versioning, metadata tagging and storage. Collaboration, annotation, reviews and approval for video and images are done in real-time for single assets or collections with a complete audit trail. Media Management has secure, encrypted file acceleration embedded in the platform guaranteeing fast delivery of large files. All of this supports multiple production centers with Media Management as the central repository to search, collect, manage and share digital content. OpenText Media Management bridges the creative production processes and Omni-channel delivery, enabling a faster and more dynamic media supply chain. It automates transformation of digital media to the proper format, aspect ratio and bit-rate based on the delivery channel allowing automated publishing to Web Content Management Systems, such as OpenText Web Experience Management System, CDN file delivery, integration with ecommerce platforms, CRM, and interactive communications. As marketing and commerce shift to high gear, it provides usage metrics as part of the larger analytics and data to allow better performance insight and the ability to make adjustments. Media Management is a core technology within the OpenText Customer Experience Management (CEM) Suite, which includes Web Experience Management, Interactive Customer Communication. OpenText delivers the integrated environments to support the many different teams involved in the creation, management and delivery of rich media. Digital Media Supply Chains enabled with OpenText technology provide a platform for today and a foundation for the future. Discover more about OpenText Media Management here.

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OpenText Celebrates Media Launch in Hollywood Style

The latest release of OpenText’s industry-leading Digital Asset Management Platform was celebrated in style at the W Hollywood Hotel in January. The event was attended by more than 100 people from the Media Industry as well as other OpenText customers. Nearly all of the major media companies were there, including 20th Century Fox, Disney, Paramount, Technicolor, Hasbro, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and many more. The celebration was kicked off with some special Hollywood luminaries as guest speakers – Kristin Kennedy, founder of Createasphere; Flint Dille, a technologist, transmediologist, writer, gamer and more; and Jonathan Taplin, Producer, Documentary Maker and Professor from Annenberg School for Communications at USC. The crowd was engaged with the speaker’s insights on some the trends as well as threats in the media industry, and how the value of IP and digital assets plays across different generations. The event capped a tremendous effort by the Media Management engineering and product teams to develop the latest release in an accelerated timeframe. Their efforts to redesign the User Interface, REST API extensions and numerous added features validates the market leading position Media Management has in the DAM industry. And a special thanks to our sponsors for helping to the make the event a huge success. Thanks to Accenture, Deloitte, OnPrem Solutions and Optima Consulting. What a perfect way to start out the year. Thanks to everyone for making this such a stellar kick-off and we are looking forward to an exceptionally bright future for OpenText Media Management.

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Today’s Media Management

The average 14-year-old kid will probably create more media by the time I finish this post than I will this year. It’s so simple to create and so necessary to communicate with these days. And therein lies the problem: The technology to create, contribute, and consume rich media has outpaced our ability to manage it. In today’s hyper-digital environment, where time is of the essence and the experience is what sells, your customers, partners, and buyers want video, pictures, and information in real-time—synchronized and delivered consistently to users on the platforms and devices they choose. So business , marketing, and competitive demands are pushing Digital Asset Management (DAM) and the digital supply chain beyond traditional approaches. We just can’t keep up using traditional methods! With multiple systems and applications trying to manage and control all these assets, things are falling through the cracks. Missing content. Missed opportunities. Lost productivity. Sigh… A Platform for Digital Asset Management OpenText Media Management is a DAM pioneer . (That’s funny every time!) From creation to consumption, we help you manage all your video, images, and rich media for the entire enterprise in one place. With a powerful yet simple-to-use interface, our solutions help people find what they need, share, collaborate, and use digital assets anywhere for richer, more effective communication in marketing, sales, and throughout the organization. Media Management makes it so easy to get the right content and rich experiences to users on the platforms and devices they choose. What’s new in Media Management? A completely redesigned user experience replaces the Flash UI with a simple yet powerful HTML5 user interface. This is much more than just a DAM—now you have unparalleled control and access to all your digital media content. The redesigned user experience in Media Management puts the digital content you want at your fingertips. Whether your typing or swiping, the simple and intuitive user interface makes your job easier. In Media Management, the HTML5 interface and responsive design reduces complexity and unnecessary clutter to find what you need, share data, collaborate on projects, and use digital assets anywhere, on any screen, including mobile and touch-enabled. There! Now how much rich media do you think that kid created?

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Experience Matters in Omni-Channel Commerce

[This article was also published in CMS Wire.] Experience matters in Omni-Channel Commerce, both the Customer Experience and the software ecosystem that supports a buyer’s journey from initial discovery to customer advocate. Just as shoppers see products on display in physical stores, digital experiences have to provide relevant content and compelling interactions to convert browsing to buying. Connected consumers expect convenience and flexibility across channels whether brick and mortar, catalog, print, in-store kiosks, web, mobile and social platforms. Nothing frustrates customers more than dead-end, can’t get there from here experiences. And second chances are rare. Omni-channel commerce is a complex ecosystem. It involves many interrelated platforms, components and capabilities such as Web Content Management, eCommerce, Digital Asset Management, product catalog, product information, merchandising, inventory, pricing, promotion, order, fulfillment, reporting, analytics and more. Unfortunately, many organizations have disconnected, legacy silos and struggle to bridge the customer engagement, customer experience side with back office and transaction management. Digital Asset Management is one of the key platforms in the ecosystem, along with eCommerce and WCM. In planning for a successful Omni-Channel Commerce initiative do not assume that DAM will be taken care of within these other platforms. DAM Infrastructure DAM serves as a core infrastructure underlying eCommerce, WCM, PIM and product catalogs. With an ever-growing pool of images, photos, audio and video to support commerce, digital assets should be synchronized with back office transaction management and the customer experience presentation. Mature and extensible DAM platforms provide integration with eCommerce and WCM to automate delivery of rich media in the proper format and size, across multiple channels driven by either the WCM or an eCommerce system. Whether serving up digital assets for the eCommerce site, public or partner catalogs, internal or external users, assets should all be sourced from a common repository – providing collaboration and brand consistency. Other important capabilities include automated synchronization and search capabilities within other platforms, localization and security. DAM capabilities increase productivity by reducing time spent searching for assets and automating repetitive tasks to “media-enable” eCommerce and the entire organization. Omni-Channel vs. Multi-Channel Rather than managing separate customer experiences through various channels as in a multi-channel strategy, Omni-channel strategy is customer-centric. It is an immersive, uninterrupted and device agnostic experience across channels that drives engagement, loyalty and transactions. The customer is at the center. It’s about the brand, product or service not the channel. DAM provides the core enterprise infrastructure, key platform components and capabilities supporting and enhancing the omni-channel ecosystem with the efficiencies of create once, publish everywhere, to repurpose, re-express, reuse, and re-create digital content for compelling customer experiences. Product owners and brand managers can collaborate, easily find and manage assets from a single library, synchronized and integrated with the other native platforms. You can find out more about DAM in this recent CMS Wire article. Go Omni-Channel Omni-channel Commerce meets customer expectations with consistent and connected experiences across all channels. This means consistency in experience as well as context and connected to information as well as continuity across channels and customer insight. Competition for customers is fierce and omni-channel commerce can be a major differentiator. As you plan your strategy, remember that experience matters.

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Forrester Names OpenText as Leader in DAM Wave Report

It’s been two years since Forrester last evaluated the Digital Asset Management marketplace OpenText Media Management is named as a leader in the most recent evaluation. We believe this validates all the hard work that has been done to build one of the world’s premiere DAM systems. According to the report, “The Forrester WaveTM: Digital Asset Management for Customer Experience, Q4 2014″, OpenText Media Management “offers a flexible platform with an impressive list of customer references. Accordingly, functionality is robust, with strengths in foundational capabilities: metadata, taxonomy, search, workflow and globalization.” Media Management builds on this foundation with our latest HTML5 User Interface to establish an elegant and intuitive way to interact and use your digital media assets. You can dowload the full report here. What you’ll discover in this comprehensive report is the key role DAM plays in the Age of the Customer and the two key areas of capabilities that today’s DAM solutions need to support. The Forrester WaveTM uses a transparent methodology to compare players in a software, hardware or services market so that the professionals the firm serves can make well-informed decisions without spending months conducting their own research. The Forrester WaveTM offers two big benefits to clients: a detailed analysis of vendors’ products and services based on transparent criteria and an Excel spreadsheet that allows clients to easily compare products and develop custom shortlists according to their own requirements. Demands for rich media in omni-channel commerce, enterprise video and marketing are evolving and growing exponentially. OpenText Media Management provides that core infrastructure to manage this ongoing digital transformation as well as the flexibility to customize to the way you work, making sure you get the right content and rich experiences to the users on the platforms and devices they choose. As a pioneer in the Digital Asset Management, OpenText helps you manage all your video, images and rich media in one place, from creation to consumption.

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INTERVIEW: Essential Features of DAM

This interview was published by the DAM Coalition, a community for Digital Asset Management and media professionals. To see other interviews and articles visit www.DAMCoalition.com DAM Coalition: Tell us about your history in digital asset management. How did you get involved with DAM? John Price: My background is in TV production during the pre-digital days. Back when analog video was still going on I worked on the technical side of production in news environments so I was directing, editing, producing and doing just about whatever needed to get done. It gave me great insight as to how the media process works. Then I moved into working with broadcast vendors in creating software to help them better manage all of the stuff they were doing. I helped them automate some of the processes that were involved in delivering their broadcast content. That evolved eventually into where I’m at with digital asset management and trying to help people manage those same processes. Now though, instead of going out to a single broadcast channel, I’m working with people as they work to get their message out across numerous channels and in multiple formats which need to be able to be viewed on many different devices. It’s a much more dynamic system, and in a lot of ways a much more complex one as well. How did that automation impact digital asset management? In a huge way, because it allowed us to control so many more processes than we were ever able to do in the past, and that gave people the freedom to focus on more important things. As you reduce manual, repetitive tasks and increase productivity, creativity jumps. DAM has allowed more to get done in various ways for a greater amount of people. In the broadcast world, most of the issues were caused by human error. Somebody hit the wrong button…somebody played the wrong commercial at the wrong time…somebody didn’t give the cue, etc. Those human errors can add up and they can be very costly. The whole prospect with automation was that it could reduce the amount of human intervention, which meant you could reduce the errors. The machine won’t be making those mistakes. Of course, it gets that much more complex, because you have to configure the system, you have to create those rules and manage the exceptions, but automation continues to be a major part of almost any DAM system. The ability to take those manual and repetitive tasks off the table so your staff has more time to be more productive is an incredibly powerful concept. When you’re having a conversation about what a DAM system can do for someone’s organization, do you find yourself having to temper expectations or is it more about trying to figure out what they want to accomplish? Conversations typically go in two directions. My preferred direction is starting out with a high level strategic path where the customer or company thinks in terms of what they’re going to do with their digital media. Most companies understand that the amount of media they’re generating is growing exponentially every year. What they don’t see is that they need to mange all of that information. Many people don’t think strategically about how they want to get from where they are today to where they want to be in the future. They aren’t sure how they’re going to go down that path. Let’s say right now that as an organization, you have all of your assets on shared drives or on people’s computers so you can’t really find anything. So you take a step back and identify that in five years, as an organization, you want to be able to access any of the rich media you own to deliver better product to your customer. If that’s where you want to go, you have quite a path to get there. But that’s where it can get exciting, because then we can start to explore lots of different methods and ways to make that a reality. There’s no one specific way to accomplish that goal, so we can look at what’s going to be the best way for your organization in terms of the way you work now. We can maximize what you have working in order to map the path for where you need to go. If you start thinking strategically, you’ll open up new opportunities. Your whole infrastructure can be energized by something like this, because it gives more people the ability to access information they want and need. That’s the one conversation we usually have. The other conversation takes that strategic thinking into account, but it’s focused on what exactly DAM is. When we have that conversation, it crystalizes into a couple core things that DAM needs to do for them. If it does those things well, it solves a lot of issues for the customer on a small and large scale. For me, the whole purpose of digital asset management is to maintain control and access to your digital assets. If I’m an organization and I’m putting lots of effort and cost into creating intellectual property, whether it’s a logo or message or anything else, I want to be able to control that asset and be able to provide proper access to it. For some of those assets, I want the entire world to be able to access them so they can download and share all of that and use them however they want. Other assets I want to maintain very tight control over that only certain people can see or use them. It all boils down to control and access. So much of it is about managing users, because I’m going to have internal users, external users, partners, agencies and all sorts of different people who are going to be contributing, consuming and modifying content. If I can create a system that allows them to easily access what they need while providing specific limitations around that access, then I’ve created a system that works for everyone. This helps the organization become more productive and also helps it grow the system. Say you’re a small marketing department and you just want to control your branding assets. Once you have that control and have everyone on the same page you can start looking at how you can expand that beyond marketing. Then you can pull in the product department and they can create consistent packaging. You can pull in the finance department so they can use the latest version of the logo. You can pull in whoever needs those assets. It really boils down to the control and access features that you can find in the typical DAM system. “DAM” is just one of the many acronyms that people use, sometimes interchangeably with others (PAM, MAM, ECM, EIM, CEM, etc.). Do you think we should still be saying “DAM” when we want to talk about the management and decisions surrounding the ingestion, cataloguing, storage, retrieval and distribution of digital assets? Or is it a moot point? DAM is a convenient and useful acronym; it has critical mass that conceptually people have some idea of what it is. As you mentioned, we have all kinds of different combinations of letters but you have to have something that you can hang all of these ideas on, and it’s kind of become accepted that “DAM” is that hanger. Whether they’re documents in an ECM system or media that needs to go to a WCM, you’re managing something that’s both digital and an asset, so the term “DAM” seems to be totally appropriate. Really though, you can look at a DAM system in whatever way you want to express the concept. And that expression will be in whatever way you want to fulfill the purpose of the DAM system. It might be in a small department, it might be WCM, it might be ECM, it might be multiple DAM systems across your entire organization. And there are lots of people who work in all of those ways and more. But it still comes down to having these digital assets and managing them in a way that works for individuals and for the organization. What sorts of people have become (to borrow a term from the DAM Guru Program) the “DAM guru” within an organization? A lot of it springs out of a desire from an individual in an organization who figures that there must be a better way to do something. They get tired of spending four hours a day or 25 hours week just trying to find a single image they need to use for a particular campaign, and that’s without even knowing if they have the rights to it. People often want to and need to organize the chaos that’s around them. As they start to organize they look for tools that will help them do that, and they find out that a DAM system can make their lives easier in many different ways. That’s the exciting thing, because you’re starting to see more and more organizations realize that these sorts of people are really providing a valuable service to the company as a whole. A lot of these organizations have tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of assets, and so many of the people in that organization have no idea where anything is or even what they have available. We are starting to see more job titles and positions being created that are focused on DAM, but titles don’t do the work. People do. And people will do what is needed so the work can be expanded. What’s an issue that you see come up over and over for people when they’re dealing with their DAM? Click link to see rest of interview: http://damcoalition.com/damcoalitionexclusive/story/what-are-the-essential-features-of-a-dam-system

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PBS Adopts OpenText Media Management

A major press announcement at the NAB Show in Las Vegas, “PBS Adopts OpenText Media Management to Support Range of Media Assets,” revealed the latest strategy for PBS in managing digital assets for their network of more than 350 member stations. A key part of that strategy is DAM and process management. “As a public media enterprise, managing and sharing an increasingly rich and complex universe of assets is a growing challenge. We were seeking an asset management system that could meet a broad range of needs,” said Chris Contakes, PBS Vice President, Information Technology. “We were looking for a solution that would help us develop the ability for producers, member stations and PBS to create, distribute and exchange rich assets efficiently and effectively. Being able to assign specific end users to deliverables along with timelines and scope of work offered us complete visibility into our processes,” continued Contakes. “The OpenText system offers us a digital asset management solution to manage assets as deliverables with assignments and due dates in order to meet PBS’s promotional and programming timelines.” OpenText worked closely with PBS, establishing a proof-of-concept to demonstrate not only how OpenText Business Process Management (BPM) and Media Management are integrated, but the value of managing processes throughout the entire digital media workstream, or supply chain, for digital assets. At OpenText, we recognize this as the Create-to-Consumean information flow. The Create-to-Consume information flow interacts with many departments in an organization. Media organizations, like PBS, are recognizing that the traditional linear workflows are overwhelmed as marketing, promotion and omni-channel distribution of media content continues to grow. At NAB2014 OpenText demonstrated the Create-to-Consume information flow based on the themes identified in working with PBS and common to the media and entertainmant industry. We mapped out a workstream demonstrating the flow of a project from the initial pitch or project commissioning, production, finalization and approvals, to Omni-channel publishing and programming. Integrated with OpenText Business Process Management, the demo started with the orchestration and management activites associated with making a program, production or even a marketing campaign. At NAB we showed how a team collaborated on a program pitch, getting the green light and then the system created a project structure in OpenText Media Management. This notified project members, assigned tasks and set up a folder structure to start gathering and sharing content. Once initiated, these parallel streams for video production, photo shoots, graphics production for DVD packaging were all able to collaborate, with status and progress being tracked througout the work-in-progress production processes. Final approval was directed from the Media Management system for all the deliverables, including marketing campaign assets, program information, product catalog, video promos etc. One area of keen interest to NAB attendees was monetization, where we showed an integration with e-Commerce, in which assets populated a product catalog for an online store allowing customers and partners to download or order content. The marketers and website producers had access to all the assets in Media Management. Integration with OpenText Web Experience Management and Customer Communication Management allowed automated customer communications and the ability to seamlessly build out the webpages and microsites with video promos and images for a rich and engaging experience. The primary goal of the demonstration was to show the digital media workstream as an ecosystem with many interdependent and interrelated applications and activities – DAM, WEM, BPM, e-Commerce, Work-in-Progress, Approvals and Omni-channel delivery all working together in a specific use case. Managing an ever-increasing number of people, processes and technology is a growing challenge for organizations. OpenText has a broad portfolio of products and experise in enterprise information management to help companies struggling with a digital media strategy. Understanding the value of the digital media workstream and how coordinated, collaborative processes bridging the creative production side with downstream deliverables for marketing and consumption can help put your company on a path to greater success.

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Nostalgia and Product Catalog Management (PCM)

I recently did a webinar (see webinar here: http://opentext.com/campaigns/better-brand-engagement.htm ) with John Sprouse from Deloitte Consulting, in which we discussed how to bring a product catalog to life with rich media. As “webinar experts” in PCM and Digital Asset Management, we shared brilliant insights about how e-commerce has shifted the product catalog creation and production aspects to the on-line digital world. Researching those old print catalogs transported me back to a time of great anticipation; waiting for the arrival of the three-inch thick Wards Christmas catalog. Flipping through the pages, I remember spending hours searching for all the latest toys and gadgets to put on my Christmas list. I could imagine riding one of those ultra-cool banana-seat bikes or that Atari thing to play video games. There were pictures, descriptions, prices – all the information needed to buy. Except you had to go to the store or fill out and send an order form with a check, then wait six to eight weeks. I wonder what it took to create those catalogs. It must have been a monumental effort, getting the photos or artwork, doing the layout and making sure all the information was accurate. How did they manage all that information in the days before digital? I speculate that these companies and their catalog workflows continuously evolved with the goal to save time and reduce costs so they could be more competitive and increase sales. I also suspect they were thinking about the customer experience with art directors, photo selection, special offers, all geared to get people to buy more stuff. Online shopping still has those basic elements – images, descriptions and prices – but e-commerce has changed the dynamics. Print catalogs: · Paper is fixed, can’t make changes · Costly production, printing, shipping and postage · No way to measure who sees catalog · Limited data on purchasing behavior · Delayed ordering by phone or mail Online shopping / e-commerce: · Dynamic; ability to create interactive, personalized shopping · More information about products · Social aspects; like, recommend, reviews, share · Metrics and analytics · Order immediately Today, there is still a great deal of effort to create a product catalog for e-commerce, although companies continue to evolve as the latest technologies help to streamline those efforts. Smarter, integrated tools provide Master Data Management so all the product IDs and SKUs are tracked and can be searched, including all the associated images, videos and content. Intelligent workflows can automatically customize and personalize experiences on the fly as buyers visit the site, using historical data and patterns. Customer experience is not just tied to the buying process. It is aligned with support and customer service, rewarding return buyers and brand advocates. This doesn’t mean that print catalogs have gone away. Now they are one channel of an Omni-channel customer outreach, whether business-to-business or business-to-customer. Product catalog management continues to evolve and is now an ecosystem of many workstreams, with information and data flowing in and out of an organization. It is an organic and adaptable process continuously changing based on the environment and other variables. As complex or simple as today’s technology allows, the ultimate purpose remains the same, get people to buy more stuff. It seems the more things change the more they remain the same.

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Finding Our Way with Digital Asset Management

by John Price [This article was also published in CMS Wire, 10/9/2013.] In one sense DAM is all over the map. There are subway style route maps to help you find your way and any number of “journeys” (or at least the “5 Best Ways…”) leading to that digital asset management / customer experience nirvana. With all the consultants, reports, vendors and products out there “enabling” and “empowering” us, how come it feels like we’re stuck in a “Where’s Waldo?” world? [Full disclosure, I work for a vendor, OpenText doing marketing stuff for DAM and Customer Experience Management, CEM.] We all can see how technology and digitization are transforming organizations, even changing societies and cultures. Digital Asset Management has morphed as well. Organizations are recognizing the need for DAM due to the tremendous increase in the amount of digital media in the organization. Back in the day, many organizations could get by with shared drives and the institutional knowledge stored by Earl in graphics. Earl retired, and, after a few website re-launches and brand makeovers, consensus was that there must be a better way. Fast forward to now and in many organizations it’s not which DAM you have but how many DAMs. Marketing, business units, regional and international teams went out to get the DAM tailored for their specific needs. The original problem DAM was supposed to solve was recreated; too many disconnected repositories and silos, and no central repository storing the single source of truth. Add to that the pressure of marketing to many new channels – the omni-channel customer experience – which has created its own challenges. “Mobile is hot, we need to have a mobile customer experience”; “We’re putting up kiosks all around the country we need to produce the content”; “let’s put some links and images in the email campaign”; “How can we get these videos on our Facebook page”. Each new channel needs creation, production, operations and delivery – usually another team to make, manage and move the digital assets. Do We Need DAM? In asking the question it implies there is an alternative, or we take the Luddite approach and go back to file folders, phone calls and couriers. Yes, we still need DAM, in all its wonderful array of many-colored solutions. Despite the market cacophony of products, features and specialized deployments (MAM, PAM, MRM, PIM, PCM, SaaS…), DAM is helping companies be more successful. There are great stories of how DAM has transformed organizations – you likely see it whenever you go online, all those images branding and videos are created, managed and stored, maybe in a DAM. It begins with organizations asking that question, do we need a DAM, do we have the right DAM? Taking on this endeavor, the DAM Champion (DAM Hero?) has a lot of work ahead. It requires understanding the process from initiation, creation, management of the assets, publishing, distribution and metrics. Documenting how things work, who does the work, how different departments are involved, the amount of time and effort for each task, the cost of lost time, duplicated effort, lost opportunity, all of this is critical to start building a business case. In many organizations to get the budget, overcome organizational inertia and resistance to change requires a compelling case to justify the change. Below are some key things that will lead to a successful outcome. Keep these in mind to help find your way: A purposeful strategic vision for digital media in the organization Commitment and buy-in from the organization A partnership with the vendor and integrator for mutually assured success Structured, phased approach Relentless user-adoption, celebrating success Knowing what done looks like Enterprise DAM and Platforms Digital Media workflows and DAM are critical for enterprises and high value brands, allowing them to accomplish their goals in eBusiness and Customer Experience transformation. Every department and business unit has rich media assets and the amount and size of those assets continue to grow. Some rich media, such as video or high definition imagery, are bandwidth intensive. It can also be difficult to find and reuse media if it isn’t properly tagged or archived. By centralizing all of your rich media assets in a common media management repository, the entire organization can repurpose digital assets across multiple channels at a lower cost. As enterprises are stretched to take on more types of media production and distribute into more customer experiences, it requires investment in best-in-class solutions across the digital media value chain. This means continuing to advance the core features of the DAM, as well as to integrate related capabilities. Enterprise DAM, e-DAM, as a platform is not a one-size-fits-all proposition; it implies the flexibility to be purpose-built for the enterprise. DAM is the centralized repository, single source of truth for digital assets, storing all the rich media for the enterprise. E-DAM is a core infrastructure with capabilities to “media-enable” the entire enterprise, especially digital marketing. The rich media assets in e-DAM are delivered to Customer Experience touchpoints adapting to the workflow and conforming the content for consumption. Inside and outside the firewall, e-DAM manages control and access to the final, approved digital assets to be used and consumed. On the other end e-DAM integrates with different creative environments such as video production, graphics, photo and images; each having unique workflows, formats and requirements. E-DAM integrated across creative teams allows collaboration, review and approve processes, extensive search and discover, file check in and out. This is the Create to Consume Information Flow, an integrated stream incorporating the People, Processes and Technology to serve the purpose and goals of the organization. As the velocity of digital marketing increases, information silos and disconnected processes become bottlenecks in the information flow. Interoperability and integration are keys to customer experience transformation. This becomes more important as the amount of data, what is known about the customer, continues to grow. Knowing purchase history and patterns, web analytics, demographics and other data sources provides actionable information to target, segment and personalize communications across experiences. Extending e-DAM using business process management for an orchestrated information flow, integrated with enterprise ERP and CRM systems, provides the intelligence layer for delivering timely, rich and compelling customer experiences. DAM delivers the consistent messaging and branding across channels, contextualized and conformed on-the-fly, increasing engagement and ultimately driving revenue. This is the aspiration of an enterprise DAM ecosystem: multiple media-enabled environments, integrated, interconnected with shared data, and automated data-driven processes supporting the enterprise the Create to Consume Information Flow. It’s a Strategy, Waldo DAM is a great technology solution. It saves time, reduces frustration, increases productivity and provides consistent branding. As it continues to mature, it is asked to do more and more. New features and functionality are bolted on as vendors are compared against checklists. Seeking a technical solution results in requirements, features, functionality and getting more for less – and it’s all over the map. Enterprise DAM is more than just a technology solution. As a platform it takes care of the DAM 1.0 requirements but more importantly it sets a foundation for the future. Enterprises are crafting digital media and marketing strategies taking into account their unique purpose and core competencies to fit together and understand all the pieces in a complex ecosystem. As media permeates all areas of an enterprise, agile, adaptable, and interoperable will be the important features for an Enterprise DAM.

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Thoughts on “5 Reasons Why DAM is No Photoshop”

I saw this thought provoking article by David Diamond in CMS Wire, “5 Reasons Why DAM is No Photoshop” (read it here) and wanted to share some of my thoughts. We both agree that DAM is no Photoshop, and I am sure even more reasons could be listed. However, I am curious as to why the comparison of DAM to PhotoShop? Is it to show how DAM has missed the mainstream boat, why DAM has not evolved into “SharePoint for the masses”? (although Microsoft would like to see it that way…) I think there are many factors in play. PhotoShop is tool for creatives – highly flexible and complex, not intuitive, too many buried menus, hard to discover capabilities and a significant learning curve. And yet, as you point out it has become the leader. It also caters to a highly skilled professional market. Other Photoshop-like systems are out there to address the non-professionals, freeware like Paint.net, photo editing tools and even mobile apps. In the world of DAM there is not a professional community per se, few organizations have identified roles for DAM Managers and those who use DAM are frequently the casual user or consumer of content. And as you know DAM can mean anything and everything, the lack of or continually expanding definition has perplexed the industry for a while. That said, your points are valid. There is a bit of schizophrenia in DAM. On one side we work with the creatives managing assets, workflow, work-in-progress all those things that are not part of the core competency of tools such as Photoshop. On the other side are business, marketing, operations and delivery departments all interacting with digital assets and DAM. Digital assets are aggregated from other sources such as stock photos and agencies, requring usage and rights management. Assets are repurposed, refreshed and reused as they move through their lifecycle, prepped, formatted and conformed to the for delivery and distribution to a myriad of destinations, platforms and devices. How do vendors, even dinosaur vendors, drive innovation and communicate better? I think part of it is a focus on the core competency of what DAM offers with the added understanding that systems exist in an ecosystem. I see it as DAM providing that core infrastructure for an organization – multiple systems and people being able to securely access that body of well-organized, cataloged, indexed and findable content to serve any number of purposes. Our experience has been that innovation is happening in the organization in partnership with vendors. Clever developers working with open API’s and flexible platforms interfacing with business, and creative systems; integrating with software to streamline and automate on-line, mobile, video, print and other delivery. The goal is not a complex, monolithic application geared only for professionals – like Photoshop – but a platform or infrastructure allowing controlled, secure access to the digital assets – the IP of the organization, integrating workflows and applications to connect people, processes and technology. This is what will help organizations be more successful as the digital world continues to saturate everything an organization does.

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3 Perspectives on Leveraging DAM to Manage Work in Progress

See ConceptShare Blog. 3 Perspectives on Leveraging DAM to Manage Work in Progress ConceptSharehas worked with over 100 enterprise marketing and creative servicesteams. By peering over their shoulders we have acquired a deepunderstanding of their work in progress (WIP) process, which theydescribe as moving from “I need an asset” to “I have an asset.” WIP is aprocess with a broad range of stakeholders working together to route,review and make decisions on work in progress. Overthe past twenty-four months WIP has become top of mind for marketers,creative teams and Digital Asset Management (DAM) system owners.Marketers and creative teams are demanding a solution that is designed,developed and optimized for managing the WIP process. As a result, theyare asking, “Can our DAM system support the WIP process?” Whatorganizations have determined is that there is no single, perfectsolution to manage WIP. Instead, the solution is a moving target basedon an organization’s current goals with respect to workflow, availabletechnology and process maturity. Manyof the organizations we work with are what we refer to as DAM-centric,investing a significant amount of time and resources into a DAM system.The DAM system is often thought of as an enabling or foundationaltechnology that can and should support all phases of an asset’slifecycle. We have observedDAM-centric organizations work through three common options beforeselecting the option that will best support WIP. Below we have outlinedthe three options we most often see enterprises consider, how theoptions meet their requirements, and our observations on why they selectone option over the others. Option #1: Use a DAM System to Manage WIP Requirements We want a single system that manages the entire lifecycle of an asset Yes We want a system (with functionality, UI, UX) that is designed and optimized for WIP No We consider WIP to be a critical process requiring support and investment No We are committed to developing a strong WIP process No Our Observation Wesee organizations adopt this option when they already have a DAM systemin place. They want to leverage their investment to deliver support forWIP to benefit from having a single system for managing the entireasset lifecycle. Organizations that choose this option don’t deliverfunctionality that is becoming a standard expectation for users involvedin the WIP process, such as the ability to annotate an asset tocommunicate clear and actionable feedback. DAM systems also have a UI/UXthat was designed for storage and distribution. For the vast number ofnon-technical users involved in the WIP process, the DAM system’s UI/UXcan complicate and slow down the overall process. Option #2: Use Two Systems Operating Independently Requirements We want one system that manages the entire lifecycle of an asset No We want a system (with functionality, UI, UX) that is designed and optimized for WIP Yes We consider WIP to be a critical process requiring support and investment Yes We are committed to developing strong WIP processes Yes Our Observation Wesee organizations adopt this option when they are seeking to deploy a“best of breed” WIP solution. WIP solutions are designed, developed andoptimized for enterprise marketing departments and agency account teamsto route, review and approve WIP. These solutions are designed for teamsthat have a narrow window of time to capture stakeholder input, reactto change requests and deliver approved assets. The benefit of thisoption is that organizations deliver functionality that is becoming astandard expectation for users involved in WIP, such as the ability toannotate an asset to communicate clear and actionable feedback. Equallyimportant these systems have a UI/UX that was designed for WIP and thebroad range of users involved in this process. However, organizations give up the benefits of having a single system thatmanages the entire asset lifecycle. By using two stand-alone systems,organizations risk creating information silos and disconnectedworkflows. Based on our observations, these organizations usuallyresolve this issue by integrating their DAM and WIP systems. Option #3: Use Two Systems Operating Interdependently Requirements We want one system that manages the entire lifecycle of an asset Yes We want a system (with functionality, UI, UX) that is designed and optimized for WIP Yes We consider WIP to be a critical process requiring support and investment Yes We are committed to developing strong WIP processes Yes Our Observation Wesee organizations adopt this option when they are seeking to deploy a“best of breed” WIP solution and tightly integrate it with their DAMsystem. These organizations believe that users should be able to work inapplications designed for their role or current task, and thatinformation and workflows should be synced across their DAM and WIPsystems. The benefit of this option is that organizations deliverfunctionality that is becoming a standard expectation for users involvedin WIP, such as the ability to annotate an asset to communicate clearand actionable feedback. Equally important these systems have a UI/UXthat was designed for WIP and the broad range of users involved in thisprocess. Organizations benefit from having a single, integrated systemthat manages the entire asset lifecycle.

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