Claudia Traving

Claudia Traving
Claudia is a Program Manager for OpenText Enterprise Content Management for SAP, with an additional focus on Public Sector, Enterprise Asset Management and IT Excellence. She is based in Germany and has worked in the SAP Solution Group at OpenText for 25 years, bringing over twenty years of experience in SAP-related solutions and business scenarios.

Simplify Migration to SAP HANA and S/4HANA

SAP HANA

Traditional Data Volume Management for SAP® Data volume management in SAP with SAP data archiving has been a best practice for SAP customers since the days of SAP R/3 and throughout the lifecycle of the SAP Business Suite. The reason for this is clear and the value of data archiving well understood, With each transaction, data is stored in the database and the volume of transactional data is ever growing. As your productive SAP database grows, resource consumption and administration effort go up while system performance deteriorates and response time for the end user goes down. This is true when using the traditional databases for the SAP Business Suite. But is this still valid going forward? The New World of Big Data with SAP HANA When SAP released SAP® HANA®, a new in-memory database, and customers moved to SAP Business Suite on HANA and SAP S/4HANA, some of the pain points become a thing of the past. High system performance and good response times are a given with SAP HANA. Also the resource consumption seems to have been reduced as HANA has a compression factor of 50%. BUT: SAP HANA as an in-memory database that requires a robust hardware platform. By nature, an in-memory database requires computing power and a substantial amount of main memory. If your database today has a size of 2 Terabyte, it will be 1 Terabyte with HANA and the memory requirements somewhat higher at about 1.25 TB (Formula: DB size (traditional DB) / 2 + 20% + 50 GB) according to the SAP QuickSizer for HANA (see SAP note 1793345) Where resource consumption in the past mostly meant expensive high performance disks, it today means an expensive, robust HANA appliance. Best Practice 1: Data Volume Management before Migration to HANA Consequently, when moving to HANA as a database, be it to SAP Suite on HANA or SAP S/4HANA, it is best practice to clean up the SAP database before doing the migration to HANA and archive older transactional data. The archived data will still be accessible in Suite on HANA and S/4HANA via the standard SAP tools and interfaces, such as the SAP Archive Information System. If you have not established a data archiving practice yet, this is the time to get started if your database is of a relevant size, for example 1 Terabyte and larger. Best Practice 2: Use a Compliant Archiving Platform And as you do so, make sure to store the resulting data files via the ArchiveLink interface on a secure and compliant storage platform. Such a platform is provided with OpenText™ Archiving for SAP® Solutions and OpenText™ Document Access for SAP® Solutions. The underlying OpenText Archive Center securely stores the SAP data files on leading storage vendor platforms, which have an immutability feature and are thus compliant storage platforms. Archive Center provides a hardware abstraction layer and in addition automatically creates backup copies of the files. This is different from storing data files in the file system, where files are not protected and you need to take care of backup and migration when the file server changes. Best Practice 3: Remove Unstructured Content from the Database And as you do the clean-up, there is one area you may want to check, that is unstructured content in your SAP database. If you haven’t configured the storage location of GOS attachments (GOS = Generic Object Services), all unstructured content that your users have added via GOS has ended up in the database and adds to the overall volume. You can check the size of table SOFFCONT1, and may want to control table DRAO for SAP DMS (Document Management System) documents as well. GOS attachments as well as DMS documents can be stored on OpenText Archive Center with OpenText Archiving and OpenText Document Access for SAP Solutions. You simply define a new storage category to reside on the OpenText Archive Center. With simple configuration you can switch from the old category to the new category (TA SKPR08). And for the migration of existing documents there is the SAP report RSIRPIRL. As a result, the unstructured content is stored on the OpenText Archive Center and your database is relieved from the burden of the unstructured content. Summary: Establish Data Volume Management and Reduce TCO Our recommendation is to establish data volume management. Data archiving helps you to reduce and control the size of the database. This reduces administration and hardware costs and can significantly reduce your TCO for the SAP landscape, and if you plan to migrate to SAP HANA as a database, you can realize significant savings by reducing the memory footprint of the HANA database, and with that the hardware footprint of the HANA appliance. For more information about SAP data and business document archiving with OpenText view the following: OpenText™ Data Archiving for SAP® Solutions OpenText™ Archiving for SAP® Solutions OpenText™ Document Access for SAP® Solutions And have a look at customer success stories on SAP data archiving here.

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General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) – How can Customers use OpenText and SAP for Timely Deletion

GDPR

In part 1 of this blog, we discussed what the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) means for enterprises and how data and content, which is generated and stored in the course of day-to-day business processes in SAP is subject to this regulation. Our example was the incoming vendor invoice on paper, which is scanned, attached to the SAP transaction via ArchiveLink and then securely stored on the OpenText™ Archive Center. This paper invoice may contain a contact name of the supplier, a phone number, an email address, all data that when combined together could identify an individual, such as an employee of the supplier. This personal data is protected by GDPR. Let’s recap: Collecting and processing data is legitimate as long as it serves a justified purpose, as defined by GDPR, “if data processing is needed for a contract, for example, for billing, a job application or a loan request; or if processing is required by a legal obligation …” Justfied purposes for storing and retaining personal data include laws that govern retention of content, such as tax relevant data and documents, where retaining the scanned vendor invoice or a customer bill is not only justified but an obligation. BUT: When the legitimate reason for the procession has expired, the transactional data and the attached ArchiveLink document need to be deleted. In our example above, the scanned vendor invoice needs to be retained as long as taxation laws require, but be deleted just after this retention period, which is 10 years in Germany for example. This means that enterprises are advised to set up retention rules to govern the necessary retention AND put processes in place that will delete data and attached content in a timely fashion, when it is no longer needed, or when the justified purpose for retention has expired. Retention Management for SAP® Data and Related Content Neither OpenText nor SAP can provide legal advice or guidance in this matter, but they do offer software capabilities that help customers set up policies and procedures for retention and deletion of transactional data and attached content. The products that play together here are SAP® Information Lifecycle Management (SAP ILM) and OpenText™ Enterprise Content Management solutions for SAP: OpenText™ Archiving, Document Access and Extended ECM for SAP Solutions (see OpenText Suite for SAP). SAP ILM provides records management for SAP data and can also be configured to apply the same retention schedule to the attached SAP ArchiveLink documents. However SAP ILM itself does not provide the storage for data and documents but relies on ILM aware platforms for this purpose. OpenText Archiving, Document Access and Extended ECM provide the compliant ILM aware platform for ILM data files and ArchiveLink documents. These solutions store the content, enforce the retention and holds from ILM and pass it up to the hardware level, and, at the end of the lifecycle, execute the deletion request coming from SAP ILM. SAP ILM acts here as leading application for the retention management of SAP data and attached ArchiveLink documents. So far so good, if you only look at SAP data and attached ArchiveLink documents. Enterprise Wide Records Management However, personal information in business documents does not stop at the boundaries of the SAP applications. You will also have content outside SAP, which you want to retain and manage, put under records management and execute timely deletion when the reason for retention has expired. This is where Extended ECM for SAP Solutions comes into play. Extended ECM provides DoD certified records management for SAP ArchiveLink documents as well as NON-SAP content, which can be related to SAP business objects via the ECMLink module. A customer that wants to benefit from the DoD certified records management for documents can use Extended ECM for all unstructured content inside and outside SAP, whereas SAP ILM provides the records management for SAP data. If SAP ILM is to delete data which relates to Extended ECM content that has not yet expired, both solutions can synchronize, so that business documents in Extended ECM will not be orphaned by SAP ILM. At the same time, Extended ECM represents the ILM aware storage platform for SAP data and documents. So SAP ILM together with Extended ECM for SAP Solutions can manage the retention of data and unstructured content inside and outside SAP. Where to Find More Information Learn more about OpenText’s capabilities to support GDPR requirement by reading our other blogs here and here. You can also visit our main web site and learn how OpenText EIM offers capabilities that support customers to prepare for GDPR or listen to our webinar.

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General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) – What is it and how Does it Impact Enterprise Information Management

GDPR

In May 2016, a new EU Regulation and Directive was released to govern the protection of personal data, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). It will enter into force after a two year grace period in May 2018. This is just little more than one year to go and enterprises need to get active to evaluate what it means for them and how they need to prepare. As stated on the European Commission website: “The objective of this new set of rules is to give citizens back control over of their personal data, and to simplify the regulatory environment for business.” Data protection laws are nothing new in the European Union. However, the new GDPR rules presents some significant impacts and changes to current data privacy regulations. For one, what used to be a directive, is now a regulation with full force of the law, valid across all EU countries. And despite BREXIT, the UK government has confirmed that UK will implement GDPR (read the UK Information Commissioner’s blog on this topic). The other important aspect is that GDPR now imposes substantial fines upon individuals and enterprises that do not adhere to the law. Minor breaches will be fined up to 10 Million EURO, or up to 2% of the total worldwide annual turnover of the preceding financial year for a business, whichever is higher. Major breaches will be fined up to 20 Million EURO, or up to 4% of the total worldwide annual turnover of the preceding financial year for a business, whichever is higher. And it should be re-emphasized that the turnover is not just the turnover of the EU located part of the enterprise, but the worldwide turnover of the enterprise. Protecting Personal Data of EU Citizens – What does that mean? As GDPR protects the personal data of the citizens of the European Union, it imposes duties upon enterprises, that collect and manage personal data. These entities are called “Data Processors”. Data processing entities located in the EU are subject to GDPR, but also companies outside the EU that process personal data of EU citizens. So the regulation also applies to non-EU enterprises: EU GDPR requires compliance outside of the EU as well (EU GDPR applies for non-EU companies with contact points to the EU). Collecting and processing data is legitimate as long as it serves a justified purpose, as defined by GDPR, for example “if data processing is needed for a contract, for example, for billing, a job application or a loan request; or if processing is required by a legal obligation …” Such justified purposes for storing and retaining personal data are, for example, laws that govern retention of content, such as tax relevant data and documents, where retaining the scanned vendor invoice or a customer bill is not only justified but an obligation. What is the relevance of GDPR for Day-to-Day Business Processes? There is personal data processed and stored during the course of day-to-day business processes that relates to business partners, such as customers and suppliers, in the procure-to-pay processes as well as order-to-cash process. To give some concrete examples, let’s now take a look at an enterprise that uses SAP ERP to manage their processes and OpenText to attach business documents to these processes. It is of course not just about the data created and stored in the SAP database of the leading enterprise application (ERP, CRM, …), it is also about the business documents that are captured during this process. Take for example, an incoming vendor invoice on paper, which is scanned, attached to the transaction via ArchiveLink and then securely stored on the OpenText™ Archive Center. Or in the example of an order-to-cash process it an incoming sales order and delivery note to a client, which are linked to the SAP order and stored in OpenText. May 2018, GDPR will start to apply following a two-year transition period to allow the public and private sector get ready for the new rules. So how should enterprise prepare and get ready for GDPR? With regards to aspects of storing personal data for a justified purpose, enterprises need to set up policies and procedures – not only to retain content as long as they are obliged to do by law such as taxation or product liability laws, but also to delete content in a timely fashion when it is no longer needed respectively the justified purpose for retention has expired. Learn more about OpenText’s capabilities to support GDPR requirement in the SAP environment in a forthcoming blog post, and also by reading our other blog entries here  and here. You can also visit our web site and learn how OpenText EIM offers capabilities that can support customers to prepare for GDPR or listen to our webinar.

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